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Literal Translation: Qui tacet consentire videtur?

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Literal Translation: Qui tacet consentire videtur?

Postby Kimble » Mon May 19, 2008 3:47 pm

Just trying to confirm my reading of a latin phrase:

Qui tacet consentire videtur

What he is silent to agree he is seen.

What his is silent (about) he is seen to agree (with).

Thanks in advance!
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Postby Amadeus » Mon May 19, 2008 4:05 pm

Who is silent to agree is seen.

Or

He who is silent is seen to agree.
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Postby thesaurus » Mon May 19, 2008 5:23 pm

A good translation of "videtur" or other passive forms of "videre" is "seems."

Thus, "One who is silent seems to agree." In other words, silence betokens consent.
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Postby bedwere » Mon May 19, 2008 6:38 pm

Do you know the origin of this? I heard somewhere it's a juridical phrase, probably related to Canon Law. In Italian we say "Chi tace acconsente".
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Postby Gonzalo » Mon May 19, 2008 6:52 pm

bedwere wrote:Do you know the origin of this? I heard somewhere it's a juridical phrase, probably related to Canon Law. In Italian we say "Chi tace acconsente".


I didn´t know that Italian phrase. In Spanish, at least Peninsular Spanish, it´s used with approximate or even the same sense in "Quien calla, otorga".
Verus enim amor semper tempore tristi elucescit magis. (Philipp Melanchthon: Decl. de studiis Linguæ Græcæ)
Quin age, si quid habes (P. Vergilii Maronis Ecloga III:52)
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Postby Lucus Eques » Mon May 19, 2008 11:41 pm

Ah, sei italiano? Benvenuto! Sempre un piacere.
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Postby bedwere » Mon May 19, 2008 11:52 pm

Lucus Eques wrote:Ah, sei italiano? Benvenuto! Sempre un piacere.

Grazie! :D
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Postby Misopogon » Tue May 20, 2008 1:29 pm

bedwere wrote:Do you know the origin of this? I heard somewhere it's a juridical phrase, probably related to Canon Law. In Italian we say "Chi tace acconsente".


You're right, it's related to Canon Law (Decretales, liber VI, titulus "de regulis", regula 43,). On the other hand the Roman Law developed the opposite rule (later accepted by the Jus Commune ): qui tacet neque negat, neque utique fatetur (D. 50.17.142,). Ironically, the Decretales contains also this contradictory rule, just slighty modified (regula 44): is, qui tacet, non fatetur, sed nec utique negare videtur.

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