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Ex 99 Question

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Ex 99 Question

Postby Bretonus » Wed Mar 05, 2008 5:21 am

Salvete!

I was reviewing older material and I came across a problem for part II of exercise 99, question 2.

"My son Sextus is carrying his booty to the Roman camp." It says not to use dative.

I came up with "Filius meus Sextus praedam suam ad castram Romanam portat." I felt weird using the accusative for Roman camp but I know I've seen that use somewhere in D'Ooge already.

The key gave me the following answer when I checked it.

Filius meus Sextus praedam suam in castra Romana portat.

I know this use of the ablative is wrong, because in means in/on.

Are either of these answers right?
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Postby timeodanaos » Wed Mar 05, 2008 10:01 am

Castra is always neuter plural, which is why the accusative after in is castra.

nom castra
acc castra
gen castrorum
dat castris
abl castris
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Postby MiguelM » Wed Mar 05, 2008 8:32 pm

"In", as well as a few other prepositions, can be used both with accusative and ablative. With ablative, it means "inside, in" something. With accusative, it means roughly "to the inside, to inside".

In castra means "into the camp"
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Postby Bretonus » Thu Mar 06, 2008 3:07 am

Thanks for correcting my clumsy mistake. Would ad fit in this in the place of in?
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Postby MiguelM » Thu Mar 06, 2008 12:16 pm

I suppose it would. However, "ad" usually carries the conotation of "to the limits of" or "to the outside of". A typical explanation is that "Ad Romam" means "to the walls/gates [limits] of Rome" whereas "In Romam" means "into the city". Also to note that in+acc can also mean "against" with a strong opposition or an attack, eg "in Catilinam", "in hostes".

"ad castra" would thus have that conotation, not that bringing the booty inside, but rather carrying carrying it to the limits. So you could, but the solution given seems to me more appropriate.

In any case, if someone more knowledgeable would shed more light on the subject, I think it would be helpful.
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Postby lgsoltek » Sun Apr 27, 2008 1:15 pm

Well, I had just now the same question, but now I found this post and it's clear now. Thank you all for answering this question, and also Bretonus for asking this question~ ;-)
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