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Erasmus Roterodamus: Colloquia

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Erasmus Roterodamus: Colloquia

Postby Gonzalo » Mon Jun 25, 2007 6:57 am

I am beginning seriously the study of Latin and in order to do that I am using the texts of the European Renacentist Grammarians (and other resources but of the XIXth century) and I found the great Colloquia Familiaria on the web. Probably, you already know they by means of Stoa.com (http://www.stoa.org/colloquia/) but I found another link to the Erasmus´ didactic dialogues.
http://www.grexlat.com/biblio/colloquia/index.html
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Verus enim amor semper tempore tristi elucescit magis. (Philipp Melanchthon: Decl. de studiis Linguæ Græcæ)
Quin age, si quid habes (P. Vergilii Maronis Ecloga III:52)
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Postby Gonzalo » Fri Jun 29, 2007 12:25 pm

There is available a XIX century copy at Google Books.
http://www.google.co.uk/books?id=hZIrAA ... s&as_brr=1
Verus enim amor semper tempore tristi elucescit magis. (Philipp Melanchthon: Decl. de studiis Linguæ Græcæ)
Quin age, si quid habes (P. Vergilii Maronis Ecloga III:52)
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Postby Gonzalo » Mon Jan 21, 2008 3:10 pm

Verus enim amor semper tempore tristi elucescit magis. (Philipp Melanchthon: Decl. de studiis Linguæ Græcæ)
Quin age, si quid habes (P. Vergilii Maronis Ecloga III:52)
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Postby thesaurus » Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:01 pm

I've also taken an interest in the Colloquia, and I've copied and pasted all of the Stoa's text into one document file. If anyone wanted a copy of it to use offline or something let me know.

Gonzalo, what other renaissance texts have you found useful? I like the natural approach to Latin that Erasmus takes.
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Postby Gonzalo » Thu Jan 24, 2008 6:42 pm

Hi, Thesaure,

I myself enjoy reading -besides Classical (specially, I love Epic, Bucolic, &c.), and some Medieval stuff- those works produced by European humanists of the XVI-XVII centuries, concretely those works related to Neostoicism. I don't like sometimes the bad use of Latin made onwards from these centuries. Well, I'll give you some names, links, &c., and let me know your objections, or other things which you´d wish to deal about.
(And, well, if you say "renaissance texts" I can also answer you by means of Iohannes Boccaccio, Petrarca and Dante. I must confess that I feel, specially Francesco Petrarca, more in favor to the Italian language (fiorentino) in his Latin writings than in favor of a mere and pure Latin.)

-Boccaccio: http://www.grexlat.com/biblio/boccaccio/index.html (Bucolicum, I´d recommend)

- Petrarch:
http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k725248
http://diglib.hab.de/wdb.php?dir=inkunabeln/160-quod-2f
http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k58300r
http://www.bibliotecaitaliana.it/xtf/vi ... 000299.xml
(Please, read De Remediis utriusque fortunae, it´s very good but I haven´t finished it yet)

- Iustus Lipsius:
http://fondosdigitales.us.es/books/sear ... age=435370
http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k1101361
http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/pdf/cok229w.pdf (De cruce libri tres)
Specially, try to find in Latin an able-to-download version his work on Constancy.
http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k107856k
http://www.juntadeandalucia.es/cultura/ ... ion=pagina


- I. C. Scaliger:
http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k52521t
and take a look at his editions of Classics in http://gallica.bnf.fr/ by writing his name.

- Valla: http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k52130p (Laurentii Vallae Elegantiarum latinae lingua)
http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k71758w

- Melanchthon: http://books.google.com/books?id=tyoMAA ... =&as_brr=1 (Take a look at the index of his Works and you´ll find a lot of interesting things to you.)

- Erasmus: http://www2.fh-augsburg.de/~harsch/Chro ... _enco.html
(Brilliant and amusing.)

Besides, you can read some compositions by Giacomo Leopardi, which are always entertaining: http://www.bibliotecaitaliana.it/xtf/vi ... nd=default

(*) These are only some reading suggestions.

As for Colloquia, I like them as a pædagogical tool. I'm not very old (I'm seventeen years old) but if I had children, I would use these Colloquia (and other ones, and Orberg's Lingua Latina, of course) in order to make them fluent in Latin, &c.

(We had sometime ago a discussion related to spoken Latin, its pros and cons (as I think), and other questions. http://www.textkit.com/greek-latin-foru ... 7&start=20 )

Regards,
Gonzalo
Last edited by Gonzalo on Wed Jan 30, 2008 7:05 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Verus enim amor semper tempore tristi elucescit magis. (Philipp Melanchthon: Decl. de studiis Linguæ Græcæ)
Quin age, si quid habes (P. Vergilii Maronis Ecloga III:52)
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Postby Gonzalo » Sat Jan 26, 2008 10:01 am

I´ve found selections from Erasmus at http://www.ipa.net/~magreyn2/erasmus.pdf and there are more texts:
http://www.ipa.net/~magreyn2/ ( http://www.ipa.net/~magreyn/ )
Verus enim amor semper tempore tristi elucescit magis. (Philipp Melanchthon: Decl. de studiis Linguæ Græcæ)
Quin age, si quid habes (P. Vergilii Maronis Ecloga III:52)
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Postby Arvid » Sat Jan 26, 2008 11:24 pm

Transcribing books is of course much more time-consuming than scanning them, so Project Gutenberg will always be behind Google Books, but the good news is, they have to pay some attention to what they're doing! They have a few works by Erasmus here. Of course, their selection of Latin works is small, but the file sizes are much smaller than scanned PDFs, too. Unfortunately, most of them are in plain .txt format. (Their theory is that proprietary formats like PDF come and go, but that people will still be able to read plain ASCII centuries from now.) You can always convert them, or download them from manybooks.net instead. They have almost all of PG's catalog, and you can download them in a variety of formats.
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Postby Gonzalo » Wed Mar 19, 2008 9:09 pm

thesaurus wrote:I've also taken an interest in the Colloquia, and I've copied and pasted all of the Stoa's text into one document file. If anyone wanted a copy of it to use offline or something let me know.

Gonzalo, what other renaissance texts have you found useful? I like the natural approach to Latin that Erasmus takes.


Take a look: http://pot-pourri.fltr.ucl.ac.be/files/ ... TP/Textes/
Verus enim amor semper tempore tristi elucescit magis. (Philipp Melanchthon: Decl. de studiis Linguæ Græcæ)
Quin age, si quid habes (P. Vergilii Maronis Ecloga III:52)
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Gonzalo
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