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Ex 111 Q 5

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Ex 111 Q 5

Postby Thomas3333333 » Sat Sep 01, 2007 7:40 am

Hi all,

A query concerning a possible predicate adjective.

The Q is: Galba unus cum studio laborat

The answer given in the key is :

Galba works alone with zeal.

Is unus a predicate adjective in this instance and thus remains nominative in agreement with Galba even though it comes after the verb?


Also,

If a Q states: One is a dog, the OTHER is a cat

and another Q states One is a dog, ANOTHER is a cat

Is the first Question an instance of ALTER and the second an instance where one would use ALIUS

Thankyou
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Re: Ex 111 Q 5

Postby modus.irrealis » Sat Sep 08, 2007 12:48 am

Hi,

Thomas3333333 wrote:Is unus a predicate adjective in this instance and thus remains nominative in agreement with Galba even though it comes after the verb?

Yes, exactly.

Is the first Question an instance of ALTER and the second an instance where one would use ALIUS

Yes again. alter is used when there are two things involved.
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Re: Ex 111 Q 5

Postby vastor » Thu Jan 31, 2008 3:49 pm

Thomas3333333 wrote:Hi all,

A query concerning a possible predicate adjective.

The Q is: Galba unus cum studio laborat

The answer given in the key is :

Galba works alone with zeal.

Is unus a predicate adjective in this instance and thus remains nominative in agreement with Galba even though it comes after the verb?


Personally I would translate that as:
Galba alone labours with enthusiasm

From my understanding, the adjective unus in that latin extract is not a predicate adjective as it stands next to the subject and before the predicate. Instead, it is called an attribute adjective.

As far as the case and gender is concerned, adjectives of a noun should always agree with them. In this case, Galba is in the first declension, but he is male, therefore un- is declined in the matching nominative case in the masculine second declension. The position of the adjective is irrelevant; It should always agree in gender and case with the noun it is modifying, regardless of order.

This is my understanding. I could be wrong though as I'm still a newbie.
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