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Dictionary Entries

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Dictionary Entries

Postby manderson » Wed Feb 14, 2007 5:26 am

Can someone tell me what the dictionary entries are? I think I know, but I want to make sure.

amo-I love
amare-to love
amavi-I have loved
amatum-have been loved

Why does the fourt part end in tum but it is conjugated with tus, a, um. Why wouldn't is just be amatus??

Please forgive me if this is a basic question. English grammar is hard! But if I can just get this down, then any other romance language should be easy, right?? :D :oops:
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Postby Goals » Wed Feb 14, 2007 6:24 am

Your translations are correct. The 4th principal part (perfect passive participle) can also just be translated as more simply as the adjective "loved". Wheelock talks about this in Chapter 12 but it looks like you understand this quite well.

A lot of texts other than Wheelock's use "amatus" instead of "amatum". A lot of dictionaries also, I believe.

I think Wheelock's does it to distinguish regular verbs (amo, amare, amavi, amatum) from semi-deponents (audeo, audere, ausus sum, to dare) and deponents (sequor, sequi, secutus sum, to follow). However it seems incredibly unnecessary
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Postby Chris Weimer » Wed Feb 14, 2007 7:01 am

Actually, when they use "amatum", they're signifying the supine, not the perfect passive participle.
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Postby Goals » Wed Feb 14, 2007 4:45 pm

"The fourth principal part, while given in its neuter form in this book, is for regular transitive verbs the perfect passive participle, a fully declinable verbal adjective of the -us,-a-,-um variety (laudatus, -a, -um, ect - some uses of the participles will be explained in Chs. 19 and 23-24). Verbs lacking a perfect passive particiiple substitute the accusative supine (see Ch. 38 ), and some verbs like sum and other ntransitives substitute a future active participle (e.g. futurum = fututurus, -a, -um), while others like possum have no fourth principle part at all." p. 76

Why he gives the neuter form I am not sure, but my guess is in my earlier post.
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Postby Chris Weimer » Wed Feb 14, 2007 10:10 pm

Goals wrote:"The fourth principal part, while given in its neuter form in this book, is for regular transitive verbs the perfect passive participle, a fully declinable verbal adjective of the -us,-a-,-um variety (laudatus, -a, -um, ect - some uses of the participles will be explained in Chs. 19 and 23-24). Verbs lacking a perfect passive participle substitute the accusative supine (see Ch. 38 ), and some verbs like sum and other ntransitives substitute a future active participle (e.g. futurum = fututurus, -a, -um), while others like possum have no fourth principle part at all." p. 76

Why he gives the neuter form I am not sure, but my guess is in my earlier post.


Italic emphasis mine

Weird, how inconsistent. Why he doesn't just use the supine for all that have a perfect passive participle is beyond me. It's the same thing, without unnecessary complication. Most standard dictionaries use just the accusative supine, or if they're brave enough, the masculine perfect passive participle. I've never seen anyone make such a distinction to differentiate between the two in listings before.~
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