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English to Latin Chapter 3

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English to Latin Chapter 3

Postby manderson » Wed Sep 20, 2006 2:04 am

I am studying for a test tomorrow and would like to know how I am doing. Right now I am going through Chapter 3 in the workbook. (I will be doing 4 and 5 later tonight.) Can someone check to see if I am right nor not?

The reputation of men and women is great my friend.
-Fama virorum et feminarum est magnorum amicus meus.

The people give much money to the sons of Romans.
-Populi multa pecunia filiis Romanorum dant.

My friend's son sees the girl.
-Mei amici filium puellam videt.

We often praise the boy's friends.
-Pueri amici saipe laundant.

Many men today do not love the wisdom of ancient philosophy.
-Multi viri hodie sapientiam antiquae philosophiae non amant.

I know I am messing something up with the underlined words (but this doesn't mean that these are the only ones!), but I need someone to break it down for me. My mind has dumped.
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Postby manderson » Wed Sep 20, 2006 2:14 am

I think I fixed some of them. What do you think?

Pueri amici saepe laundant- WRONG
Amicus pueri saepe laundant

Mei amici filium peuellam videt-WRONG
Filium mei amici puellam videt.

Also, is this correct?

Pueri rosas vident
-The boys see roses.
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Postby bellum paxque » Wed Sep 20, 2006 3:11 am

Hi there!

I am studying for a test tomorrow and would like to know how I am doing.


Good luck on your test! Maybe my comments will help you a little.

The reputation of men and women is great my friend.
-Fama virorum et feminarum est magnorum amicus meus.


-magna, not magnorum: fama...est magna. magna is an adjective agreeing with fama, which is feminine singular nominative

The people give much money to the sons of Romans.
-Populi multa pecunia filiis Romanorum dant.


-Populus, not populi: for the idea "the people" (of a country), just use the singular populus.
-also, multam pecuniam - use accusative case since it is the object of dant (what do they give? they give a lot of money)

My friend's son sees the girl.
-Mei amici filium puellam videt.
...
Mei amici filium peuellam videt-WRONG
Filium mei amici puellam videt.


-Actually, the position of mei amici doesn't matter - both are fine. But "son" should be nominative (filius) since it's the subject of the sentence (who sees the girl? the son sees)

We often praise the boy's friends.
-Pueri amici saipe laundant.

Pueri amici saepe laundant- WRONG
Amicus pueri saepe laundant


-first of all, the verb needs to agree with we, that is, 1st person plural. change laudant to lauda--- (what is the 1st person plural ending?)
-second, amicus is nominative singular, but you need accusative plural (amicos) since it's the object of the sentence (who do we praise? we praise the friends...)

Many men today do not love the wisdom of ancient philosophy.
-Multi viri hodie sapientiam antiquae philosophiae non amant.


optime factum! great job!

Pueri rosas vident
-The boys see roses.


id quoque optime factum! great job on this as well!

---

vale,

David
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Postby manderson » Wed Sep 20, 2006 3:54 am

Thanks so much! I see exactly what you are talking about. I never learned the symantics of English grammar so this is kicking me in the hind end. I hate translating from English to Latin! I know that the subject comes first and the verb last, but the middle part always gets me.

Now to study Chapters 4 & 5...
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Re: English to Latin Chapter 3

Postby Silenus » Wed Sep 20, 2006 11:52 pm

manderson wrote:The reputation of men and women is great my friend.
-Fama virorum et feminarum est magnorum amicus meus.


One more thing here, "my friend" is a direct address in this sentence, and so amicus and meus should be in the vocative. I'm not sure whether or not Wheelock's mentions this early that the vocative of meus is mi.
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Postby bellum paxque » Thu Sep 21, 2006 12:33 am

One more thing here, "my friend" is a direct address in this sentence, and so amicus and meus should be in the vocative. I'm not sure whether or not Wheelock's mentions this early that the vocative of meus is mi.


Oh yes! I knew there'd be something I'd forget.

Do you know the vocative of amicus, manderson? It's amice. So, "..., my friend" is mi amice. (But meus amicus puellam uidet, becuase here it's the subject, so nominative case)

-David
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Postby manderson » Thu Sep 21, 2006 2:33 am

I have noticed that this board says that you put things like that in the vocative, but my professor doesn't do it that way. At least I don't think so... I think I'll email him and ask. Thanks again for all your help! I know I passed the test, I am hoping that I got a B.
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