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Types of Speech

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Types of Speech

Postby Paul » Fri Jul 28, 2006 2:27 am

How sensitive were the NT authors, especially Paul, to the semantic differences between λαλέω and λέγω ?

Cordially,

Paul
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Postby Bert » Fri Jul 28, 2006 12:03 pm

R.C Trench says that in the New Testament these two words follow the distinction wich he described. (Emphasis on uttering sound versus emphasis on what was uttered.)
He does not say anything about specific authors.
He does say that lale/w had not retained its contemptuous meaning. (chatter, illogical mixture of words.)

This does not really answer your question but maybe someone can build on it.
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Postby Paul » Fri Jul 28, 2006 1:57 pm

Thanks Bert. That helps some.

I raise this question in the context of certain of Paul's remarks about how women are supposed to behave, e.g., 1 Cor 14:34. This is an interesting passage because it uses both verbs. Women may not λαλεῖν; The Law speaks in the manner of λέγειν.

It's a weak induction, but it does suggest that Paul is sensitive to the historical difference between these words.

Elsewhere, e.g., 1 Cor 11:5, Paul uses two strong participles to describe women praying aloud.

I think it's clear that Paul does not deny women all types of speech. Rather, when in church, they are to avoid λαλεῖν, which stricture doubtless applies also to men.

Cordially,

Paul
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Postby IreneY » Fri Jul 28, 2006 6:39 pm

I am very far from being an expert on NT but it seems to me that, although at times most authors are not overtly careful about the nuances when it comes to word with similar meaning, they do use the right one when they wish to make a point.

While Paul strikes me as hmmm a bit ocnservative when it comes to the role of women, I too do not think he wanted us to just shut up.
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Postby Bert » Sat Jul 29, 2006 4:28 pm

Comparing verse 34 with 35 sheds some light on this.
In 35 it says what women are to do instead of asking something in the assembly. Ask at home.
In my estimation the restriction of verse 34 cannot apply to men as well as women.
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Re: Types of Speech

Postby joja » Tue Mar 30, 2010 6:15 pm

Re; Woman preachers

"One wanted to know if it was wrong for women to testify, or to sing, or give messages in tongue, interpretate the messages, or prophecy in the church.
No, it isn't wrong; it's a--as long as it comes in the place in order. See?
...But women are gifted with prophecy, and gifted with tongues and interpretations, and everything but being preachers. They're not to be preachers. They're forbidden to preach in the churches (That's right.), take the place, or be a teacher, or anything in the church. But as far as gifts, the woman has all those, can occupy one or any of those nine spiritual gifts according to I Corinthians 12, and is under no bondage that her message should not come forth in its place.
... But a woman does have the right." - William M. Branham
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