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M&F 10

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M&F 10

Postby bingley » Sat Aug 23, 2003 6:32 am

Could someone check my English to Latin translations, please:<br /><br />1. Because the people of this city have been conquered by the Roman soldiers, the woman's husband, bold in character, is going to try to flee in order that he may seek (ask for) aid from the guardians of the other towns.<br /><br /> Populo huius urbis a militibus Romanis superatis, coniunx feminae audax moribus fugere temptaturus est ut auxilium a custodibus oppidorum aliorum petat.<br /><br />2. On account of the treaty by which they were joined to the Romans, the husband learned that the guardians did not desire to give aid to any people.<br /><br />Coniunx didicit custodes foederis causa eos Romanis iungentis auxilium populo ulli dare non potare.<br /><br />3. He alone will not be able to flee to the shore because of fear; the others have already boldly set sail.<br /><br /> Solus ad litorem fugere metu non poterit; alii iam vela audace dederunt.<br /><br />4. In the whole world I have never seen with my eyes a man of such great skill.<br /><br />In toto orbe terrarum numquam oculis meis virum tantae artis vidi.<br /><br />5. Since he has done these things, his name will be borne by the winds to all lands in order that people may praise him.<br /><br /> Propter res quas egit nomen eius ad omnes terras ventis afferetur ut populus eum laudet.<br /><br />
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Re:M&F 10

Postby Skylax » Sat Aug 23, 2003 1:08 pm

Note : as usual, I don't know what M&F want you to do. ??? So I send you "blind" corrections...<br /><br /> Populo huius urbis a militibus Romanis superato, coniunx (vir) feminae (mulieris) audax [moribus] (animo - ingenio) (audaci ingenio praeditus) fugere temptaturus est (temptat - temptabit) ut auxilium a custodibus oppidorum aliorum petat.<br /><br />Coniunx didicit (cognovit) custodes propter foedus (ex foedere) quo Romanis iuncti erant (quod cum Romanis icerant), foederis causa eos Romanis iungentis* auxilium populo ulli dare (ferre) nolle.<br /><br />*(causa don't fit in here, for it refers to the future and implies a purpose : foederis causa would refer to a treaty that doesn't yet exist. However, the scored out phrase is grammatically perfect !)<br /><br /> Solus ad litus fugere [metu] propter (ob) metum non poterit; alii iam vela audacter dederunt.<br /><br />In toto orbe terrarum numquam oculis meis virum tantae artis vidi.<br />Fine!<br /><br /> Propter res quas egit* (Quoniam eas res gessit - Quoniam ea fecit) nomen eius ad omnes terras ventis afferetur ut populus eum laudet.<br />*(rem agere means rather "to mind one's business, attend to one's own affairs")<br /><br />Quis custodiet custodes ?
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Re:M&F 10

Postby bingley » Tue Aug 26, 2003 4:55 am

Thanks scylax. <br /><br />What is the difference between didicit and cognovit?<br /><br />(The theme of the unit, by the way, was ablative absolutes, ablatives of cause and description, and quantative adjs and pronouns)
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Re:M&F 10

Postby Skylax » Tue Aug 26, 2003 1:24 pm

[quote author=bingley link=board=3;threadid=538;start=0#4913 date=1061873750]<br />What is the difference between didicit and cognovit?<br />[/quote]<br /><br />disco implies a more or less sustained effort to learn a certain body of knowledge (an art, civil right, even virtue...), it is "learn by study".<br /><br />cognosco is more direct, it means to "find out" (learn a calamity), although it can imply some effort of investigation.<br /><br />Sometimes, disco means "find out news by means of a message" : Ibi a Viridomaro atque Eporedorige Aeduis appellatus discit cum omni equitatu Litaviccum ad sollicitandos Aeduos profectum "Having then held an interview with Viridomarus and Eporedirix the Aeduans, he learns that Litavicus had set out with all the cavalry to raise the Aedui" (from Perseus)<br /><br />
<br />(The theme of the unit, by the way, was ablative absolutes, ablatives of cause and description, and quantative adjs and pronouns)<br />
<br /><br />Then, you can write in the firt sentence :<br />mulieris coniunx, vir audaci ingenio,..., but audacis ingenii is also possible.<br /><br />and in the last one :<br /><br />His rebus ab eo gestis... - Quibus ab eo factis...<br /><br />By the way, ablative of cause is not so common in Latin : it denotes an "internal, driving cause" (gelu torpere "to be numb with cold")
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Re:M&F 10

Postby bingley » Wed Aug 27, 2003 6:01 am

OK. Thanks again.
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Postby GVR2 » Mon Aug 11, 2008 6:22 pm

Skylax: I was wondering what the positive adverb from audax is and whether it is better to use audacter in #3 above. Thank you.
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