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Lesson 9

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Lesson 9

Postby Hammurabi » Mon May 01, 2006 4:11 am

Hi guys.. today I worked on lesson 9.... I'm starting to love more this
:D :D

This (man) is criting about the glory of the other man.
11. Hic de gloria alterius viri scribit.
The whole state will thank this man alone.
12. Tota civitas huic viro soli gratias aget.
On account of that courage of yours those (men) will lead no troops into these places.
13. Sub istam vitutem hi viri in has locas nullas copias agent.
Will one good book overcome the faults of our times?
14. Superabitne unus liber bonus culpas temporum nostrorum?

and a little something from mine.. :oops: :oops:

In hac terra solus sum. Non est locus mihi in nulla civitate. O magister mee! Poterisne me conservare? Me nullus liber servare nunc potest, nulla sapientia. Fortunane gloriaque in vita mea erunt? Quomodo mihi superare potero? Unus igitur solus non sum sed enim toti, et totos conservare non potes.

Thanx very much for your help guys!! :D :shock: 8) :oops:
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Postby Deudeditus » Mon May 01, 2006 2:57 pm

This (man) is criting about the glory of the other man.
11. Hic de gloria alterius viri scribit.

aye.
The whole state will thank this man alone.
12. Tota civitas huic viro soli gratias aget.

aye, again
On account of that courage of yours those (men) will lead no troops into these places.
13. Sub istam vitutem hi viri in has locas nullas copias agent.

propter istam uirtutem would be right. other than that, thrice aye.
Will one good book overcome the faults of our times?
14. Superabitne unus liber bonus culpas temporum nostrorum?

hmmm... aye.

I didn't read your composition yet again, but I noticed 'O magister mee' out of the corner of my eye. I'm sure you meant mee in the vocative case, which is mi : O mi fili! 'O my son!'

but good job! *disclaimer* if any of my 'corrections' are wrong, I got 2 hours of sleep last night. :cry:
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Postby Hammurabi » Mon May 01, 2006 5:01 pm

thanx Jon!

I didn't know the vocative for "meus" was "mi" :)

thanx:)

:D :D
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Postby Deudeditus » Mon May 01, 2006 6:11 pm

yes. the vocative of 2nd declension nouns/adj. in -ius is -i long. as in o mi fili, which exhibits the vocative of meus as well. note that sometimes the voc./nom. plural of -ius n/adj. in -i, as well, but that the same case of meus follows the declensional patterns regularly, that is, the vocative plural of meus is mei. o mei fili and o mei filii.

I hope that helped a little, and I hope even more that it was right! :D

-Jon

PS - I'm not quite sure what the vocative of -eus nouns is (wether or not it forms the vocative as does meus, or is -ee, or something else...). I seem to remember some debate over the vocative of Amadeus' name, but I don't remember the conclusion.[/b]
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Postby bellum paxque » Tue May 02, 2006 5:43 am

Sorry: I don't remember what the vocative of nouns in -eus is. But I did find this weird little bit of trivia online:

NOTE.--The vocative singular of deus does not occur in classic Latin, but is said to have been dee; deus (like the nominative) occurs in the Vulgate. For the genitive plural, divum or divom (from divus, divine) is often used.

from http://community.middlebury.edu/~harris/AG_1.html

In hac terra solus sum. Non est locus mihi in nulla civitate. O magister mee! Poterisne me conservare? Me nullus liber servare nunc potest, nulla sapientia. Fortunane gloriaque in vita mea erunt? Quomodo mihi superare potero? Unus igitur solus non sum sed enim toti, et totos conservare non potes.


-non est locus mihi in ulla civitate - beware the double negative, fine in French but a leper in Latin.
-magister mi, as Deudeditus observed
-I might say nihil librorum...nihil sapientiae to express this (literally, "nothing of books...nothing of wisdom"). But the gramar is fine.
-superare usually takes an object - if you want an intransitive verb (one without an object), try valere or superesse (super + esse, means "to be left over") or maybe permanere
-enim is a conjunction meaning for, indicating reason or cause - I think you need the preposition pro (takes the ablative), which can mean "on behalf of"; thus unus igitur solus non sum sed pro totis - also, you may not have learned omnis,-e yet, but it's more common for this type of "all"; thus pro omnibus or maybe even omnium causa (causa here is in the genitive, literally "by cause of all" or better "for the sake of all" - or even cuiusque causa "for the sake of each one" (Whew!)
-again... omnes conservare non potes

Best wishes!

David
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Postby Hammurabi » Thu May 04, 2006 4:29 am

bellum paxque wrote:-non est locus mihi in ulla civitate - beware the double negative, fine in French but a leper in Latin.
-magister mi, as Deudeditus observed
-I might say nihil librorum...nihil sapientiae to express this (literally, "nothing of books...nothing of wisdom"). But the gramar is fine.
-superare usually takes an object - if you want an intransitive verb (one without an object), try valere or superesse (super + esse, means "to be left over") or maybe permanere
-enim is a conjunction meaning for, indicating reason or cause - I think you need the preposition pro (takes the ablative), which can mean "on behalf of"; thus unus igitur solus non sum sed pro totis - also, you may not have learned omnis,-e yet, but it's more common for this type of "all"; thus pro omnibus or maybe even omnium causa (causa here is in the genitive, literally "by cause of all" or better "for the sake of all" - or even cuiusque causa "for the sake of each one" (Whew!)
-again... omnes conservare non potes
Best wishes!
David


Thank you bellum paxque!
About the double negative :oops: :oops: It must be the habitude.

well. and about the preposition "pro" ..I still didn't know it and either omnis nor causa, ae..... :oops: :oops: :oops:

Thank for the corrections! :oops: :oops: I'll work on fix those grammar and vocabulary errors :?
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Postby bellum paxque » Thu May 04, 2006 11:51 pm

Whoops! I meant with causa in the ablative not the genitive.

Don't worry - you're doing fine! You can't really be expected to know vocabulary you haven't met yet, can you? I'm really impressed at your progress and enthusiasm. Keep it up!

Regards,

David
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