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Unit 3 Reading

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Unit 3 Reading

Postby Mofmog » Mon Jul 11, 2005 7:18 pm

I'm not sure if I translated this sentence correctly:

Ibi re'g'inam mortuam vi'dit et o'ra'vit ne' se' i'nsidia'rum da'mna'ret, sed re'gi'na neque specta'vit neque Aene'a'n audi'vit.

There he saw and spoke to the dead queen in order that she not accuse him of treachery, but the queen neither saw nor heard Aeneas.

I'm unsure if neque means neither... nor since I can't find it in the book. I even thought it meant ne' + que but that didn't make sense ??
Last edited by Mofmog on Mon Jul 11, 2005 8:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Cyborg » Mon Jul 11, 2005 8:25 pm

I think you've got the first part of the sentence wrong.
"neque" was tought in p.40 and is synonym to "nec".
for "et o'ra'vit ne' se' i'nsidia'rum da'mna'ret", check the last example on p.52 and the third on p.53.
Give it another try after that and I'm sure you'll get it right. :)
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Postby Mofmog » Mon Jul 11, 2005 8:40 pm

Cyborg wrote:I think you've got the first part of the sentence wrong.
"neque" was tought in p.40 and is synonym to "nec".
for "et o'ra'vit ne' se' i'nsidia'rum da'mna'ret", check the last example on p.52 and the third on p.53.
Give it another try after that and I'm sure you'll get it right. :)


Ibi re'g'inam mortuam vi'dit et o'ra'vit ne' se' i'nsidia'rum da'mna'ret, sed re'gi'na neque specta'vit neque Aene'a'n audi'vit.

There he saw the dead queen and begged so that she may not accuse him of treachery, but the queen neither saw nor heard Aeneas.

Oh I see where I went wrong. I mistook "to beg" for "to speak".

Edit: This book is so Iupiter lightning bolt it dense that it's hard to find alot of things :(
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Re: Unit 3 Reading

Postby benissimus » Mon Jul 11, 2005 8:51 pm

Mofmog wrote:I'm unsure if neque means neither... nor since I can't find it in the book. I even thought it meant ne' + que but that didn't make sense ??

That is the right meaning for neque (when there are two). neque is actually ne + -que, but this ne has kept it original meaning as a general "not", like non (non = ne unum "not one, not a bit"). In most other places, ne has been replaced by non.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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Postby Cyborg » Mon Jul 11, 2005 9:01 pm

Mofmog wrote:Edit: This book is so Iupiter lightning bolt it dense that it's hard to find alot of things :(

But it's a great book, isn't it? :)
I'm loving it, I'm to finish Unit 3 today, I've been on a 1-unit-a-day pace since I got it and plan to keep that way, if it should not get too hard.
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Re: Unit 3 Reading

Postby Mofmog » Mon Jul 11, 2005 9:43 pm

benissimus wrote:
Mofmog wrote:I'm unsure if neque means neither... nor since I can't find it in the book. I even thought it meant ne' + que but that didn't make sense ??

That is the right meaning for neque (when there are two). neque is actually ne + -que, but this ne has kept it original meaning as a general "not", like non (non = ne unum "not one, not a bit"). In most other places, ne has been replaced by non.


So pre classical latin uses ne? I'll remeber that one. Also, how do I pronounce "mortuus" with the double u's?
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Re: Unit 3 Reading

Postby benissimus » Mon Jul 11, 2005 11:33 pm

Mofmog wrote:
benissimus wrote:
Mofmog wrote:I'm unsure if neque means neither... nor since I can't find it in the book. I even thought it meant ne' + que but that didn't make sense ??

That is the right meaning for neque (when there are two). neque is actually ne + -que, but this ne has kept it original meaning as a general "not", like non (non = ne unum "not one, not a bit"). In most other places, ne has been replaced by non.


So pre classical latin uses ne? I'll remeber that one. Also, how do I pronounce "mortuus" with the double u's?

yes, ne is the original word meaning "not", and is the original negative in all Indo-European languages. mortuus should be pronounced like mor-tu-us. In modern textbooks that distinguish between v and u, always pronounce u as a vowel and v as a consonant (not mor-twus). There are some times when a u is pronounced v or vice versa, but those will not appear in your textbook.
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Postby Mofmog » Tue Jul 12, 2005 5:31 pm

I'm having trouble remembering all this vocabulary. Is it important?
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Postby benissimus » Tue Jul 12, 2005 5:34 pm

Mofmog wrote:I'm having trouble remembering all this vocabulary. Is it important?

What vocabulary are you referring to? You should try to memorize it all, but you don't have to do it all at once. You can't read much if you don't know the words, grammar is only one part of the language.
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Postby bellum paxque » Wed Jul 13, 2005 4:14 am

Benissimus said:
In modern textbooks that distinguish between v and u, always pronounce u as a vowel and v as a consonant


Except, of course, after q. I suppose it is because of English usage that modern textbooks, though subsituting v for nearly all instances of consonantal u, still keep the u when following q? The combination, of course, yields phoetic "kw." Maybe there's some better explanation for this inconsistency that I haven't considered?

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