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M&F Unit 18 English to Latin

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M&F Unit 18 English to Latin

Postby bingley » Thu May 27, 2004 1:12 pm

The last unit. :shock:

A real ragbag of topics:

Subjunctive by Attraction
futurum esse/fore ut
syncopated forms
Accusative of Respect (Greek accusative)
Adverbial accusative
Genitive of Remembering and Forgetting
Genitive of Indefinite Value
Ablative of Price
quod = the fact that


English to Latin sentences:
1. Although the man was wounded in the foot, he forgot his pain and, for the most part, fought courageously

Pedem vulneratus, tamen homo doloris oblitus est et maximam partem fortiter pugnavit.

2. He said that he would not be able to sell his sword for much money; in times of peace,others don't value such weapons highly.

Dixit fore ut gladium magno pretio vendere non posseret; temporibus pacis alii arma talia non magni habeant.

3. The fact that he bought his own safety at the price of the freedom of his people disgusts me.

Me piget quod salutem libertate populi eius emit.

I must confess I was not sure whether to use eius or sui here. His refers to the subject of emit, but the main verb is piget, which is impersonal.

4. I wanted to gird myself with a sword in order that I might drive back the soldiers who were rushing into the city.

Ut milites in urbem ruentes repellerem ferrum cingi volui.


All suggestions, comments gratefully received.
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Postby Skylax » Sun Jun 06, 2004 8:38 am

the last remarks :wink:

2. posset (imperfect subjunctive always built from the infinitive) ; "in times of peace" etc. : the indirect speech is going on, so we must build an infinitive clause (acc. cum inf.) with DIXIT : nam pace alios arma talia non magni habere

3. it is SUI (referring to the subject of EMIT, the verb of the clause in which the possessive is used)

4. ferrum : rather ferro (gladio, ense) in the ablative, meaning "being girded by means of a sword".

Sine nunc me tibi gratulari quod tam magum opus tam bene confecisti :D
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Postby bingley » Mon Jun 07, 2004 3:15 pm

Once again I tender my grateful thanks, Skylax.
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Postby Cyborg » Sun Jul 10, 2005 10:27 pm

Wow, you already made that far!
So tell me, how does it feel like?
Do you still fear seeing torches on the road, or did the inhabitants make you change your opinion about their reputation? :D
But seriously, how do you feel of your Latin skills now?
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Postby bingley » Fri Aug 12, 2005 9:37 am

I must admit I'm finding the transition to REAL Latin difficult. I've joined the latinstudy group reading Augustine's Confessions and I'm struggling, despite the inestimable advantage of actually having a context for the sentences. Real life demands aren't helping, I don't have the time to make full use of the latinstudy system.
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Postby bellum paxque » Fri Aug 12, 2005 11:41 am

A few points of uncertainty here. . .

the indirect speech is going on, so we must build an infinitive clause (acc. cum inf.) with DIXIT : nam pace alios arma talia non magni habere


This assumes that the second half of the sentence (for in times of peace, etc) is in fact also something that the man said. It could quite possibly be authorial commentary. But, as Skylax notes, your translation assumes the latter.

4. ferrum : rather ferro (gladio, ense) in the ablative, meaning "being girded by means of a sword".


I'm pretty sure that, according to the points M&F make in this last chapter, ferrum would also be acceptable. Maybe I should read the section about the greek accusative/accusative of respect again, but I'm pretty sure that cingitur is functioning in (as close as Latin comes to) the middle voice, and ferrum could potentially be a virtual object. In this case, we would understand the meaning to be "he girds on a sword." Cf. deponent verbs.

I'm not arguing that ferro is incorrect, but rather that, again according to M&F, ferrum is an equally possible option.

Sincerely, and all respect to those, like Skylax, who far exceed me in knowledge and experience with Latin

David
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