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Paragraph 21 #7

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Paragraph 21 #7

Postby Timotheus » Wed Apr 06, 2005 1:13 am

the 'kai' does not translate well.

it is better "we have many 'good, noble, beautiful...' plans."

should this concern me?
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Postby Kasper » Wed Apr 06, 2005 1:20 am

The thing about foreign languages is that they don't usually translate word for word into another language. Be flexible mate!

"We have many and good plans."

That works doesn't it? They are both many and good.

"kai" means a range of words: and, both, too, also, even, etc.
“Cum ego verbo utar,” Humpty Dumpty dixit voce contempta, “indicat illud quod optem – nec plus nec minus.”
“Est tamen rogatio” dixit Alice, “an efficere verba tot res indicare possis.”
“Rogatio est, “Humpty Dumpty responsit, “quae fiat magister – id cunctum est.”
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Postby Timotheus » Wed Apr 06, 2005 2:05 am

thanks :D
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Re: Paragraph 21 #7

Postby annis » Wed Apr 06, 2005 12:36 pm

Timotheus wrote:the 'kai' does not translate well.


When you use two adjectives to modify a single noun, Greek uses [face=spionic]kai/[/face], but English, and plenty of other languages, are happy just to string the adjectives along.

Homer, of course, gets special license, so sometimes has two adjectives without [face=spionic]kai/[/face].
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Re: Paragraph 21 #7

Postby Kasper » Wed Apr 06, 2005 10:44 pm

annis wrote:
Timotheus wrote:the 'kai' does not translate well.


When you use two adjectives to modify a single noun, Greek uses [face=spionic]kai/[/face], but English, and plenty of other languages, are happy just to string the adjectives along.

Homer, of course, gets special license, so sometimes has two adjectives without [face=spionic]kai/[/face].


If you'd write ancient greek like Homer (ie. no augment, adjectives, etc.) you'd fail your exam. :?
“Cum ego verbo utar,” Humpty Dumpty dixit voce contempta, “indicat illud quod optem – nec plus nec minus.”
“Est tamen rogatio” dixit Alice, “an efficere verba tot res indicare possis.”
“Rogatio est, “Humpty Dumpty responsit, “quae fiat magister – id cunctum est.”
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Re: Paragraph 21 #7

Postby Bombichka » Sat Apr 09, 2005 9:45 pm

Kasper wrote:If you'd write ancient greek like Homer (ie. no augment, adjectives, etc.) you'd fail your exam. :?


It depends on what kind of Greek is your exam based upon :wink:
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