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Honey, you are in my liver ?!!

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Honey, you are in my liver ?!!

Postby givarya » Thu Nov 18, 2004 3:40 am

The ancients considered liver (IECUR, IECINORIS) the seat of all feelings. Here is something to look into; Are there any references to liver in slang, proverbs, and such that involves love, lover, beauty, or emotions? My guess is there are some at least in Latin. what about other languages?
:roll:
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Postby MyIlium » Thu Nov 18, 2004 5:29 am

My vocab isn't especially strong, but...no, I can't think of any, even in Latin. I know that the ancient Chinese and Egyptians were believers in the heart as the core of your being, and therefore feelings, I guess.
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Postby Kasper » Thu Nov 18, 2004 5:30 am

MyIlium wrote:My vocab isn't especially strong, but...no, I can't think of any, even in Latin. I know that the ancient Chinese and Egyptians were believers in the heart as the core of your being, and therefore feelings, I guess.


Same thing in england - learning things by heart.
“Cum ego verbo utar,” Humpty Dumpty dixit voce contempta, “indicat illud quod optem – nec plus nec minus.”
“Est tamen rogatio” dixit Alice, “an efficere verba tot res indicare possis.”
“Rogatio est, “Humpty Dumpty responsit, “quae fiat magister – id cunctum est.”
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Postby Bert » Thu Nov 18, 2004 1:31 pm

[face=SPIonic]spla/gxna [/face] is used in the NT the way we would use heart.
It might not be specifically liver but the inward parts, guts maybe, sure includes the liver.
In English we do have 'gut feelings'.
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Postby masuro » Thu Nov 18, 2004 2:24 pm

In Korean, a person with a 'big liver' is brave. Does that count? And English speakers say, 'lily-livered' for someone who is cowardly, no? There must a common root for those expressions somewhere . . . . .
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Postby annis » Thu Nov 18, 2004 2:52 pm

In English, angry people can vent their spleen.
William S. Annis — http://www.aoidoi.org/http://www.scholiastae.org/
τίς πατέρ' αἰνήσει εἰ μὴ κακοδαίμονες υἱοί;
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Postby ThomasGR » Thu Nov 18, 2004 3:00 pm

The anscient Greeks thought much of the gall (bile, choler); χολη in Greek. From Greek we have inherited "melancholy" in English and other European languages, which means black gall.
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Postby Democritus » Thu Nov 18, 2004 7:07 pm

I can't stomach this conversation. It gives me cold feet. :D
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Postby Turpissimus » Thu Nov 18, 2004 10:04 pm

The anscient Greeks thought much of the gall (bile, choler); χολη in Greek. From Greek we have inherited "melancholy" in English and other European languages, which means black gall.


Then there's sanguine (cheerfully confident and optimistic) and phlegmatic (calm, unemotional).

I'm afraid I don't know of any Latin idioms involving body parts.
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Postby classicalclarinet » Fri Nov 19, 2004 7:40 am

sanguine (cheerfully confident and optimistic)


That's very confusing for me.. I always think of 'bloody' which is wholly different.
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Postby Aurelia » Sat Nov 20, 2004 6:47 pm

Then there's sanguine (cheerfully confident and optimistic) and phlegmatic (calm, unemotional).

I'm afraid I don't know of any Latin idioms involving body parts


don't forget Choleric!
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Postby givarya » Sun Nov 21, 2004 4:57 am

in Chinese there is Îҵĸγ¦´ç¶Ï (wo de gan chang cun duan) which is "my liver and intestines are broken into pieces" meaning I am extremly sad.
:roll:
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Postby klewlis » Sun Nov 21, 2004 5:15 am

i believe there are some in hebrew, which english bibles tend to translate as "heart" anyway. but someone who knows more hebrew than i do can speak to that. :)
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Postby Koala » Sun Nov 21, 2004 7:18 am

the Hebrew scriptures have. . .

“My eyes do fail with tears,
my bowels are troubled,
my liver is poured upon the earth,
for the destruction of the daughter of my people” Lam 2:11

where ‘bowels’ and ‘liver’ are ‘mē’âh’ and ‘kâbêd’ respectively

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Postby primitive » Sun Nov 21, 2004 6:20 pm

givarya wrote:in Chinese there is Îҵĸγ¦´ç¶Ï (wo de gan chang cun duan) which is "my liver and intestines are broken into pieces" meaning I am extremly sad.
:roll:


im trying to learn cantonese. i do know some things. here is what i learned how to say.

Ngoh mh haih yahn.
I am not a person.

???? haha
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Postby MyIlium » Tue Jan 18, 2005 4:04 am

I must retract my earlier statement. In Chinese if a person has a bad attitude or something, he is said to have a bad liver. Hmm.
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Postby Kladaradatsj » Tue Jan 18, 2005 8:30 pm

Dutch uses 'uit het hoofd leren': to learn out of one's head = by heart. It holds the heart to be the seat of emotions. You also can 'have something on your liver', which means something's bothering you. And as in English it has 'treading some one's toes', which has in turn led to the marvelous 'having long toes' for getting upset easily.

I vagely recall my Professor of Greek saying that some Russian writers (Platonov c.s. ?) held the bowels as the seat of emotions. Or was it the liver? I'll try and ask him some day after the exams.
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Egyptian Kidneys

Postby Jefferson Cicero » Fri Jan 21, 2005 6:02 pm

Didn't the ancient Egyptians think the kidneys were the seat of emotion?
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Postby Olga R. » Wed Apr 13, 2005 10:17 pm

Bert wrote:[face=SPIonic]spla/gxna [/face] is used in the NT the way we would use heart.
It might not be specifically liver but the inward parts, guts maybe, sure includes the liver.
.


The same in Modern Greek.
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Postby yadfothgildloc » Thu Apr 14, 2005 4:47 am

klewlis wrote:i believe there are some in hebrew, which english bibles tend to translate as "heart" anyway. but someone who knows more hebrew than i do can speak to that. :)


Kidneys are the seat of courage for the ancient Israelites.
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