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Adjective endings

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Re:Adjective endings

Postby Milito » Mon Jul 21, 2003 3:10 pm

[quote author=mariek link=board=3;threadid=267;start=30#1677 date=1058736492]<br /><br />I haven't learned "eörum" yet. And I haven't really learned verbs yet.<br /><br />[/quote]<br />You'll get there with the verbs, and you're doing fine!<br /><br />eorum - means "of them" = theirs.<br /><br />It's part of the is/ea/id pronoun that got growled about a while back.<br /><br />If you've got to the 2nd declension nouns yet, you'll see that the feminine endings (for 1st declension) for plural genitive are "arum", while masculine/neuter (2nd declension) plural genitive endings are "orum". The arum/orum thing is a bit of a dead give-away that you're looking at some sort of plural genitive.<br /><br />Does this help?<br /><br />Kilmeny
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby Milito » Mon Jul 21, 2003 3:17 pm

[quote author=mariek link=board=3;threadid=267;start=30#1677 date=1058736492]<br /><br />I haven't learned "eörum" yet. And I haven't really learned verbs yet.<br /><br />[/quote]<br />You'll get there with the verbs, and you're doing fine!<br /><br />eorum - means "of them" = theirs.<br /><br />It's part of the is/ea/id pronoun that got growled about a while back.<br /><br />If you've got to the 2nd declension nouns yet, you'll see that the feminine endings (for 1st declension) for plural genitive are "arum", while masculine/neuter (2nd declension) plural genitive endings are "orum". The arum/orum thing is a bit of a dead give-away that you're looking at some sort of plural genitive.<br /><br />Does this help?<br /><br />Kilmeny
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby Episcopus » Mon Jul 21, 2003 3:35 pm

I knew the accent grave, just this ã ??? qui est ça?!
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby mariek » Mon Jul 21, 2003 4:02 pm

[quote author=Episcopus link=board=3;threadid=267;start=30#1717 date=1058801756]<br />I knew the accent grave, just this ã ??? qui est ça?!<br />[/quote]<br />I think it's just called a "tilde". I could only get it on the letters a and o. Do you know how to get the tilde on e, i, and u?
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby Episcopus » Mon Jul 21, 2003 6:09 pm

putõ nõn esse
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby mariek » Mon Jul 21, 2003 9:53 pm

[quote author=Milito link=board=3;threadid=267;start=30#1708 date=1058800216]<br />eorum - means "of them" = theirs.[/quote]<br /><br />Then "liberös eörum necäbam" = I killed their children.<br /><br />Oh boy, is, ea, and id ... more stuff to look forward to.<br />
<br />The arum/orum thing is a bit of a dead give-away that you're looking at some sort of plural genitive.
<br /><br />Ooooooh.... I like that! :) I hadn't caught on to that little detail yet.<br /><br />
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby mariek » Mon Jul 21, 2003 9:55 pm

[quote author=Episcopus link=board=3;threadid=267;start=30#1735 date=1058810998]<br />putõ nõn esse [/quote]<br /><br />I'm gussing that means : I don't exist to think.<br /><br />Am I correct?<br />
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby benissimus » Tue Jul 22, 2003 12:14 am

I don't think to be... I assume he implies "I don't think (it) to be/exist". Good try, it takes a lot of imagination to figure out what Episcopus is saying sometimes ;D
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby mariek » Tue Jul 22, 2003 4:22 am

Phrase in question : putõ nõn esse <br /><br />I guessed : I don't exist to think<br /><br />[quote author=benissimus link=board=3;threadid=267;start=45#1748 date=1058832847]<br />I don't think to be... I assume he implies "I don't think (it) to be/exist". Good try, it takes a lot of imagination to figure out what Episcopus is saying sometimes ;D<br />[/quote]<br />I'm trying to understand the sentence. I thought that nön negates the verb that immediates follows it. Thus, nön esse would mean "not to be" or "not to exist". How do you apply nön to the verb püto? This is definitely adding a challenge in knowing what nön is supposed to apply to.<br /><br />Confused as usual...
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby bingley » Tue Jul 22, 2003 4:45 am

This is because of a quirk of English. Think about it, if you say "I don't think it exists" what is actually being negated, the thought or the existence?<br /><br />Latin, being nice and logical, puts the negation where it really belongs -- with the existence. If I remember rightly, Greek is similar to English and puts the negation with the thinking (though I'm open to correction on this).
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby mariek » Tue Jul 22, 2003 6:36 pm

[quote author=bingley link=board=3;threadid=267;start=45#1762 date=1058849158]<br />This is because of a quirk of English. Think about it, if you say "I don't think it exists" what is actually being negated, the thought or the existence?<br /><br />Latin, being nice and logical, puts the negation where it really belongs -- with the existence.<br />[/quote]<br /><br />I guess it's the existence that is being negated. It's becoming less fuzzy now.<br /><br />I just realized I misread putö. I should have translated that word to "I think". So literally the phrase reads, "I think not exist." And now I understand how the phrase means "I don't think it exists".<br />
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby Episcopus » Tue Jul 22, 2003 7:33 pm

Sorry!<br /><br />I think "puto id non esse" is clearer!<br /><br />That's what I implied Cogitem! labõrãs cum magnã dilgentiã!
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby mariek » Tue Jul 22, 2003 8:15 pm

[quote author=Episcopus link=board=3;threadid=267;start=45#1813 date=1058902405]<br />I think "puto id non esse" is clearer![/quote]<br /><br />So this is litterally : I think it doesn't exist. ?<br />
That's what I implied Cogitem! labõrãs cum magnã dilgentiã!
<br /><br />I'm guessing : I would think. You work with a lot of diligence.<br /><br /> Cogitem! = I would think<br /> laböräs = you work (labäre)<br /> cum = with<br /> magnä = big (ABL)<br /> dïligentiä = diligence (ABL)<br /><br />Temptö! Latinus dificilis est! Discö tardë. Sorry, I have to work through all the parts when I'm trying to translate Latin.<br /><br />Is the word for Latin language "latinus" or "latina"? It shows up as both masc & fem in my dictionary. Or maybe I'm reading it all wrong.<br /><br />
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby benissimus » Tue Jul 22, 2003 10:40 pm

Latinus is properly an adjective. I think the preferred way of saying it would be lingua Latina, but if you mean "in Latin," as in "We speak in Latin," then you would use Latine(Latinly).
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby mariek » Wed Jul 23, 2003 12:52 am

<br />In that case, what I should have written was this : Lingua Latina difficillis est. So does this mean there doesn't exist a noun form for Latin? How strange...<br /><br />Latine loquï = to speak Latin.<br /><br />I couldn't figure out how to conjugate loquï, to say "we speak". It doesn't fall under any of Milito's 5 tests. Loquï must be one of those oddball exceptions to the rule?<br />
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby bingley » Wed Jul 23, 2003 1:48 am

loquor loqui locutus is what is called a deponent verb. This means that its form is always passive, but its (English) meaning is always active.
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby mariek » Wed Jul 23, 2003 2:16 am

[quote author=bingley link=board=3;threadid=267;start=45#1845 date=1058924901]<br />loquor loqui locutus is what is called a deponent verb. This means that its form is always passive, but its (English) meaning is always active. <br />[/quote]<br />OK, I've got a long ways to go until I learn about Deponent Verbs. I found it on Pg146 in BLD. So as I understand it, it is conjugated only in the Passive. So would loqui be conjugated like the passive form of 3rd Conj Verbs?<br /><br />loquor, loqueris, loquitur, loquimur, loquiminï, loquuntur ???<br /><br />
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby benissimus » Wed Jul 23, 2003 2:55 am

Yup! loqui is indeed a third conjugation verb. You conjugate it the same as a passive form of a typical verb.<br /><br />Also, I have seen the word Latina used to name the Latin language (lingua Latina), but never by a reputable source. This form implies the word lingua because of the feminine ending, but I think most people would know what you meant.
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby mariek » Wed Jul 23, 2003 4:57 am

[quote author=benissimus link=board=3;threadid=267;start=45#1850 date=1058928905]<br />Also, I have seen the word Latina used to name the Latin language (lingua Latina), but never by a reputable source. This form implies the word lingua because of the feminine ending, but I think most people would know what you meant.[/quote]<br /><br /><br />I will try to remember it as "lingua latina" as praeponiö discere linguam latinam idöneam.<br /><br />
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby Milito » Thu Jul 24, 2003 3:06 pm

[quote author=mariek link=board=3;threadid=267;start=45#1843 date=1058921533]<br /><br /><br />I couldn't figure out how to conjugate loquï, to say "we speak". It doesn't fall under any of Milito's 5 tests. Loquï must be one of those oddball exceptions to the rule?<br /><br />[/quote]<br /><br />.... sorry.... I thought about mentioning deponents, but figured it would be needlessly complicating matters.... Ah well..... But Benissimus explained it very well, thus bailing me out.....<br /><br />On the lack of noun for "Latin".... If you think about it, we (in English) are very sloppy with our use of the linguistic names. When we say "I speak English", we MEAN "I speak the English language", and if I were to say "I am English", I would a) be lying, since I'm Canadian, and b) really MEAN "I am a person who speaks the English language." English is by nature a very sloppy language, which is why it has such a lot of exceptions and miserable grammar rules. We who speak it do try to take the shortest route to comprehension, which is why we tend to put bits and pieces together to "create" new words now and again to get a point across. On the other hand, Latin is much more precise, so things are much more clearly delineated.......<br /><br />Okay, I'll get off the soapbox now..... It's a subject that happens to interest me.................<br /><br />Kilmeny
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby Episcopus » Thu Jul 24, 2003 4:26 pm

right on you silly american trucker! english is a pile of **** deteriorating schnitt; being eaten by the flies that are retards and mobile phone messages. i lik ltn alt cz itz kl cmn 2 da clb 2nite slee trka
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby Milito » Thu Jul 24, 2003 8:44 pm

[quote author=Episcopus link=board=3;threadid=267;start=60#1915 date=1059064002]i lik ltn alt cz itz kl cmn 2 da clb 2nite slee trka<br />[/quote]<br /><br />The frightening thing is that I think I understood that.............<br /><br />Kilmeny
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby Episcopus » Thu Jul 24, 2003 9:09 pm

however I have come to accept it...and although I abstain from writing text messages - I detest them - I like to "mock", or rather have my own fun with weaknesses of english. <br /><br />The best 'dialect' has to be that of rappers - and snoop d-o-double-gizzle has even made his own noun and adj endings :o 'izzle' when it feels o-kizzle...<br /><br />i'm sure you to have heard of 'for shizzle my nizzle...' :-\<br /><br />
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby benissimus » Thu Jul 24, 2003 10:46 pm

O Episcope, you are bizarre 8)
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby mariek » Fri Jul 25, 2003 1:48 am

[quote author=Milito link=board=3;threadid=267;start=45#1910 date=1059059191]<br />On the lack of noun for "Latin".... If you think about it, we (in English) are very sloppy with our use of the linguistic names.[/quote]<br /><br />I never thought of it that way. So we really should be saying "I speak the English language" but we're just too lazy to do that.<br /><br />I can't imagine saying "I'm English" to mean I'm someone who speaks English. I would say "I'm American", and I would think you would be able to say "I'm Canadian" and people should be able to figure out that you speak English or French. :) <br />
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby mariek » Fri Jul 25, 2003 1:53 am

[quote author=Milito link=board=3;threadid=267;start=60#1922 date=1059079464]<br />[quote author=Episcopus link=board=3;threadid=267;start=60#1915 date=1059064002]i lik ltn alt cz itz kl cmn 2 da clb 2nite slee trka<br />[/quote]<br /><br />The frightening thing is that I think I understood that.............<br />[/quote]<br /><br />Me too! Now what does that say about us? Hmmm.... !!!! <br /><br />Epis: You should send such mesgs to your buddies over the phone/pager in Latin. ;D <br />
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby benissimus » Fri Jul 25, 2003 1:55 am

Hehe, Latin would make messages shorter without making you look like an illiterate :D
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby bingley » Fri Jul 25, 2003 4:10 am

[quote author=Milito link=board=3;threadid=267;start=45#1910 date=1059059191]<br /><br />On the lack of noun for "Latin".... If you think about it, we (in English) are very sloppy with our use of the linguistic names. When we say "I speak English", we MEAN "I speak the English language", and if I were to say "I am English", I would a) be lying, since I'm Canadian, and b) really MEAN "I am a person who speaks the English language." English is by nature a very sloppy language, which is why it has such a lot of exceptions and miserable grammar rules. We who speak it do try to take the shortest route to comprehension, which is why we tend to put bits and pieces together to "create" new words now and again to get a point across. On the other hand, Latin is much more precise, so things are much more clearly delineated.......<br /><br />Okay, I'll get off the soapbox now..... It's a subject that happens to interest me.................<br /><br />Kilmeny<br />[/quote]<br /><br />We're not sloppy at all (well all right some people are, but no doubt the average Tomus, Ricardus, et Haroldus used language that made Cicero cringe). Just because Latin needs to say lingua latina loquor, doesn't mean English has to say I speak the English language. Unfortunately, the grammar we use to talk about English was originally used for Latin -- a completely different language. Just as our spelling is a terrible mess partly because we use an alphabet designed for Latin rather than one designed for English, which has a lot more sounds (about 40 I think), so grammar lessons are difficult because we're using a tool designed to do something else. [/rant]
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby Episcopus » Fri Jul 25, 2003 2:23 pm

[quote author=benissimus link=board=3;threadid=267;start=60#1941 date=1059098158]<br />Hehe, Latin would make messages shorter without making you look like an illiterate :D<br />[/quote]<br /><br />I agrizzle!! so much shorter...eg copiis rõmãnis nocebantur<br />=the roman abundances were being harmed ;D<br />some one make a latin sentence out of an english one, try to quarter it ::) <br /><br />anyhizzle, multi equizzles ad magna opidizzle copiizzle frumentizzle portant. <br />multãs feminizzles mulcebizzle quia pulchrizzle erizzle.<br /><br />=neo latin<br /><br />
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby Milito » Mon Jul 28, 2003 1:32 pm

[quote author=bingley link=board=3;threadid=267;start=60#1949 date=1059106232]<br /><br />We're not sloppy at all (well all right some people are, but no doubt the average Tomus, Ricardus, et Haroldus used language that made Cicero cringe). Just because Latin needs to say lingua latina loquor, doesn't mean English has to say I speak the English language. Unfortunately, the grammar we use to talk about English was originally used for Latin -- a completely different language. Just as our spelling is a terrible mess partly because we use an alphabet designed for Latin rather than one designed for English, which has a lot more sounds (about 40 I think), so grammar lessons are difficult because we're using a tool designed to do something else. [/rant]<br />[/quote]<br /><br />You're correct - we don't **have** to say "I speak the English language" to be correct these days. But nevertheless, it's what we mean when we say "I speak English"! :)<br /><br />A large part of the difficulty with the Spelling of English also stems from the Invention of the Dictionary, which standardized spelling, at a time when a lot of those extraneous sounds in so many words were still being pronounced - eg: "Daughter" didn't then sound like "dotter", but more like the result of a collision between "docter" and "dogger"..........<br /><br />I suppose I should de-generalize the comment on "sloppy" - though I did get a kick out of "Tomus, Richardus et Haroldus", and you're probably right about Cicero cringing - by saying that what we're speaking now would have been considered incredibly sloppy, so far as grammar goes, 200 years ago, and our pronounciation completely alien. That's what makes English a living language - not only does it keep swallowing up other languages' words whole, like some linguistic black whole, but it keeps changing its own grammar and accepted rules of word usage and pronounciation even over ten-year spans. It also has developed its own little occupational sub-dialogs.... (which I would have had to spell "dialogues" not long ago....) It's truly amazing to watch it (so to speak...) morph before your eyes (ears?) even while you watch it change in ways you may wish it had avoided. Or, anyway, I find it so................ But as observed before, I'm a little weird myself.......<br /><br />Kilmeny
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby Episcopus » Mon Jul 28, 2003 2:28 pm

Well I said truck english after having heard that the conditional perfect could be used in the first part of 'if' clauses and stuff...and it's now standard...some authors use it...<br /><br />id est 'if i would have left my mother alone, i would have stayed home' <br />
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby Magistra » Mon Jul 28, 2003 10:58 pm

Episcopus:<br />Well I said truck english after having heard that the conditional perfect could be used in the first part of 'if' clauses and stuff...and it's now standard...some authors use it...<br /><br />id est 'if i would have left my mother alone, i would have stayed home' <br /><br /><br />Hmmm.... And I thought I came up with some strange examples.<br /><br />"Interesting" comment with your picture. Maybe the Greek is a disclaimer? I haven't studied Greek -- ancient or modern.<br /><br />Cool sequencing of pictures with text! I'd like to learn how to do that.<br /><br />Magistra<br /><br /><br />
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby Episcopus » Tue Jul 29, 2003 11:56 am

In paint shop pro make 10 images of the same size, then mess about in animation shop...I had no idea but I finally did it - glad you appreciate it ;D<br /><br />Is the grammar in the comment alright? <br /><br />I know no greek but the alphabet basically so I just wrote Episkopos est malus
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby Magistra » Wed Jul 30, 2003 1:16 am

Oh well... I don't have paint shop pro (or anything close). Thanks anyway.<br /><br />"Is the grammar content all right?"<br /><br /> I believe so. The content, well ......? What is it you're really trying to say?<br /><br />Magistra<br /><br />
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby mariek » Wed Jul 30, 2003 6:38 am

[quote author=Episcopus link=board=3;threadid=267;start=60#2164 date=1059479779]<br />In paint shop pro make 10 images of the same size, then mess about in animation shop... [/quote]<br /><br />That's really neat. I don't have Paint Shop Pro but I do have Photoshop 7 I think, I should go look, I haven't actually installed it yet. I wonder if I can do something similar with Photoshop. Would you happen to know?<br />
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Re:Adjective endings

Postby Episcopus » Wed Jul 30, 2003 10:09 am

Well, just ... acquire Paintshop Pro 7 and Animation Shop from the ... Computer Store...<br /><br />Ah...in house on own...Episcopus malus praedam vocat
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