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Unt 1 Question Confusion

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Unt 1 Question Confusion

Postby classicalclarinet » Sun Aug 22, 2004 11:37 pm

some of the excercises I'm confused about-

Turbamne terrebas? Non terrebam.
-"Did you terrufy the crowd? I did not" is what I came up with..

Aquam nautis dabitis?
-"You gave water to the sailors" I don't know why there is a question mark..

Feminas in viis videbatis, sed de forma non clamabatis. Poenas dabitis
-"You saw the women in the roads, but you didn't shout about (their) beauty. You will pay a penalty"

Nautae feminas taedis terrebant.
-????

Insulam esse patriam hebebat.
-"He has the island being his country" Sounds wrong...

Videre taedas patrae est nautis cura
-"To see the torches of the country is the poets' care"?? Nautis isn't genitive so I have no idea.

From the reading- "Subito nauta cum turba et incolarum et feminarum e patria troiaa ad reginae patriam appropinquat."
-"Suddenly the sailor with the crowd both of inhabitants and women of the Trojan country approach the country's Queen"
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Re: Unt 1 Question Confusion

Postby benissimus » Mon Aug 23, 2004 1:49 am

classicalclarinet wrote:some of the excercises I'm confused about-

Turbamne terrebas? Non terrebam.
-"Did you terrufy the crowd? I did not" is what I came up with..

This is correct. Latin has no exact way to say "no", so you either have to reaffirm what the other person said (terrebam) or deny it (non terrebam).

Aquam nautis dabitis?
-"You gave water to the sailors" I don't know why there is a question mark..

There is a question mark because it is a question! :D Questions are not always introduced by the enclitic -ne. Translate it as "You will (will you) give water to the sailors?".

Feminas in viis videbatis, sed de forma non clamabatis. Poenas dabitis
-"You saw the women in the roads, but you didn't shout about (their) beauty. You will pay a penalty"

This is correct.

Nautae feminas taedis terrebant.
-????

I assume you are confused about taedis. It is an ablative of means and should be translated as "by means of torches" or simply "with torches".

Insulam esse patriam hebebat.
-"He has the island being his country" Sounds wrong...

habeo, -ere can also mean to consider or regard. "He considered the island to be his homeland" or "He regarded the island as his fatherland".

Videre taedas patrae est nautis cura
-"To see the torches of the country is the poets' care"?? Nautis isn't genitive so I have no idea.

nauta means "sailor", not "poet". The dative case is sometimes used to show possession, just like in English. You could translate this as "To see the torches of the country is a concern to the sailors" or more loosely "... is the poets' concern".

From the reading- "Subito nauta cum turba et incolarum et feminarum e patria troiaa ad reginae patriam appropinquat."
-"Suddenly the sailor with the crowd both of inhabitants and women of the Trojan country approach the country's Queen"

e patria Troia means "from/of the country, Troy". patria Troiana would be "the Trojan country".
ad reginae patriam means "to the queen's country", not "to the country's queen".
Last edited by benissimus on Mon Aug 23, 2004 3:52 am, edited 1 time in total.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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Re: Unt 1 Question Confusion

Postby Titus Marius Crispus » Mon Aug 23, 2004 3:20 am

benissimus wrote:
Aquam nautis dabitis?
-"You gave water to the sailors" I don't know why there is a question mark..

There is a question mark because it is a question! :D Questions are not always introduced by the enclitic -ne. Translate it as "You gave water to the sailors?" or "Did you give water to the sailors?".


Would this not be "Will you give water to the sailors?"
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Postby benissimus » Mon Aug 23, 2004 3:53 am

You are right, I think I was too focused on his question and didn't give the sentence a very good review. :oops:
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Postby classicalclarinet » Mon Aug 23, 2004 3:59 am

nauta means "sailor", not "poet".


Do'h!! Those 2 sound so alike when doing those excersises in the middle of the night! :)
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