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NEED URGENT TRANSLATION

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NEED URGENT TRANSLATION

Postby SHAZ2005 » Sun Apr 20, 2003 6:27 pm

:oNEED THIS TRANSLATED TO LATIN PLEASE:<br />'UNITY IS STRENGTH'<br />WOULD BE VERY GRATEFUL<br />THANKU :)
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Re:NEED URGENT TRANSLATION

Postby Elucubrator » Sun Apr 20, 2003 7:05 pm

Hi Shaz, that sounds like a motto. What are you working on? <br />I can off ther following suggestions, either the prosaic:<br /><br />vires in societate<br /><br />or, more poetically:<br /><br />societate robur<br /><br />In exchange for the favour could you go to the polls I set up on the site and cast your votes for your favourite Greek and Latin authors? Not many people have participated yet. Thanks, and let me know if you need any more help with the translations above.<br /><br />yours,<br /><br />Seba
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Re:NEED URGENT TRANSLATION

Postby SHAZ2005 » Sun Apr 20, 2003 7:41 pm

i am a soccer player and at present our motto is carpe diem which u know means seize the day<br />we are changing this to 'unity is strength' so far i have came up with virtus unita, valet but as u know dont have a clue but am told by a friend that this is wrong can u help<br />
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Re:NEED URGENT TRANSLATION

Postby Elucubrator » Sun Apr 20, 2003 9:01 pm

Soccer, eh? Ok.<br /><br />the Latin word "vis" means "force, or might". In the plural "vires" it signifies "strength" and is the most common word used. <br /><br />The word "robur" or "robor" if you want a more archaic flavour, literally means "oak" (as in the tree), by metonymy this word is used poetically to mean "strength", the oak tree being a symbol of something which with age grows gnarled and strong.<br /><br />"Societas" means "alliance", "cooperation", "union". If you write: "In Societate Vires" or "Vires in Societate" you get something which means "strength in alliance". Or, "strength in Union". I am not sure however if this is what you have in mind when you say "unity".<br /><br />Similarly, "Societate Robur" would mean "Strength by means of alliance". I like this one better because it's more poetic, and gives the sense that your strength comes about through cooperation, rather than existing merely because you are part of the same group, which is the feeling I get from the first options above with "vires".<br /><br />Perhaps, however, you may prefer, the word "concordia" which means "union, harmony, concord". The sentence:<br /><br />"Concordia vincit" would mean "Harmony prevails." The word strength is not explicitly there, but if it prevails you may understand it. "Vincit" is also the latin verb which means "to conquer", as in Julius Caesars famous dictum: "Veni, Vidi, Vici" (I came, I saw, I conquered). So that "Concordia vincit" = "Harmony/ agreement/ union conquers." Maybe this is what you had in mind: a team that will be victorious when all the elements of the team are working together harmoniously.<br /><br />This last suggestion also has the advantage of being the most elegant, as rhythmycally it is in its cadence = to the final measures of a dactylic hexametre. The rythym is --- --'- ^ ^ --'- ---. where the dashes represent the long or heavier syllables, and the carots are the short and quick ones in pronunciation: BUM BUM ta ta BUM BUM. In addition the ictus of the verse and the accent harmonize in the last measures of the line. (this may be technical talk to you) but anyone who is good at Latin will notice this. And for those who don't, it will be there waiting to be discovered. By the way, the little ' marks in the dashes above are where the stress falls when you pronounce the words in Latin.<br /><br />Anyway, for all these reasons, I would consider "Concordia Vincit" as perhaps the most elegant and best motto. "Concordia Victrix" would have the same effects, and means "Harmony is Conqueror" or "Harmony is the victorious one". It doesn't sound cheesy in Latin as it does in English. And a good translator would probably render it "Harmony conquers/prevails" just as in the case of "Concordia Vincit".<br /><br />Sorry that this mail is getting so long. I am thinking through the options as I write. in comparing these last two:<br /><br />(a) Concordia Vincit<br />(b) Concordia Victrix<br /><br />the combination of sounds at the end of (b) "-ctrix" is rougher and more difficult to pronounce. This suggests that Concord/Harmony/Working in Unison prevails, but that it is still tough, and in the end you may still be a little beat up. On the other hand option (a) ends smoothly and suggests the peace attendant upon victory. Because it is more mellifluous, and more pregnant in meaning this is the better choice.<br /><br />Ok, I'm done with my reasonings. You should use:<br /><br />Concordia Vincit.<br /><br />but let me know if you want me to try to work something out with "Vires or Robur". I still think the sample with Concordia will actually prevail over all other suggestions. ;-)<br /><br />let me know what the rest of the team thinks<br />yours,<br /><br />Sebastian<br /><br /><br />Concordia vincit.....<br /><br /><br /><br />(damn, it's beautiful) ::)
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Re:NEED URGENT TRANSLATION

Postby benissimus » Mon May 12, 2003 6:22 am

Simply "Unitas vires" or "Unitas est vires". There is such a wealth of options though. This has a sense of <br />"Oneness is strength"
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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Re:NEED URGENT TRANSLATION

Postby Elucubrator » Tue May 13, 2003 5:04 pm

[quote author=benissimus link=board=3;threadid=60;start=0#465 date=1052720522]<br />Simply "Unitas vires" or "Unitas est vires". There is such a wealth of options though. This has a sense of <br />"Oneness is strength"<br />[/quote]<br /><br />I don't think this works in Latin. Can you find vires, a plural noun, anywhere in Latin literature with a singular predicate?<br /><br />I realise that in English the words "strength" and "unity" are both singular, but not so in Latin, and you know this too.<br /><br />-S.
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Re:NEED URGENT TRANSLATION

Postby benissimus » Wed May 14, 2003 5:17 am

Good point, but if it is as in English... i.e. <br />"Humans are a tool" - the verb does not match both nouns...<br />but I cannot imagine any example following the pattern<br /> "(Sing.)-is-(Plur.)"
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