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Help! Comenius Vestibulum

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Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Mon Mar 27, 2017 12:21 am

Here is my document

The original document (Latin-English).

Here is the original document (Polish/German/Latin)

Edit: I am now basing my Vestibulum mostly after the Polish/German/Latin edition as it is in many ways superior.
Last edited by Ursinus on Thu Apr 27, 2017 1:32 am, edited 5 times in total.
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby bedwere » Mon Mar 27, 2017 1:56 am

Chapter one

We clothed go. --> We go clothed ? I'm not a native speaker, but I never heard anybody say "we clothed go".
A unicorn is a fierce animal --> A rhinoceros is a wild animal
A lion is a cruel [animal]. --> A lion is a ferocious animal
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Mon Mar 27, 2017 1:59 am

I am a native speaker :D, and you're right; no one says that. The reason I rendered it that way was because, especially at the beginning of the Vesitibulum, I was aiming for extremely literal translations, including matching the Latin syntax. The translation we have says we go about with clothes, which is better English; I wanted to capture the passive participle in English, however. I might just change this, though, because it's horrible English.
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby mwh » Mon Mar 27, 2017 2:29 am

Just looking at the beginning:
προτόπειροι should be πρωτό-. It’s a nice word (if an uncommon one) but it doesn’t mean children.
μανθάνατε should be μανθάνετε.
I don’t look further, but let's hope the rest is better than this.
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby bedwere » Mon Mar 27, 2017 2:36 am

Here's the Greek Vestibulum. One typo is in the book (it is spelled correctly in the note), the other is not.
The author is Christian Tobias Damm (1699-1778) "a renowned German Classical philologist."
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby bedwere » Mon Mar 27, 2017 3:44 am

Per fluiviōs vadāmus. --> Per fluviōs vadāmus.

Cēdit retrō, ubī nequit peregere. --> Cēdit retrō, ubī nequit pergere.

Metuit damnum, querit lucrum. --> Metuit damnum, quaerit lucrum.

I finished the second chapter.
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby mwh » Mon Mar 27, 2017 4:25 am

One typo is in the book (it is spellt correctly in the note)

:D Nice one.
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Mon Mar 27, 2017 12:21 pm

mwh wrote:Just looking at the beginning:
προτόπειροι should be πρωτό-. It’s a nice word (if an uncommon one) but it doesn’t mean children.
μανθάνατε should be μανθάνετε.
I don’t look further, but let's hope the rest is better than this.
I haven't really started the Greek Vestibulum in earnest. I promise the Latin version is more free from these silly errors :wink:
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby bedwere » Mon Mar 27, 2017 2:30 pm

Evan, in your Latin-English Vestibulum some parts are missing but are present in the Greek. You may want to take then from this Latin-German-Polish edition and add them. For example, venite tyrunculi.
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Mon Mar 27, 2017 3:42 pm

Thanks, Bewere. I noticed that as well when you sent me the Greek version. I'll see what I can do. I'm hoping it won't involve too much more work!
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Mon Mar 27, 2017 6:51 pm

I've redone Caput Primum, adding the additional words from the Vesitibulum you provided. Would you mind, Bedwere, looking again through the first chapter? There were a decent amount of words and a couple of them I was uncertain of. Thanks again!
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby bedwere » Mon Mar 27, 2017 7:14 pm

Capra gracile et machilentum. --> Capra gracile et macilentum.

Chīrugus (?) idōnea vel inidōnea. --> Chīrurgus idōneus vel inidōneus.

Sēps (?) pessima, (us). --> Sēps pessima.
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby bedwere » Thu Mar 30, 2017 5:25 pm

Chapter 3

Quandō in hortō fuistī. --> Quandō in hortō fuistī?

Ebo dubitās? --> Eho dubitās?
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby bedwere » Sun Apr 02, 2017 1:52 am

Chapter IV

Quō in artibus ērudiātur. Here "quo" means "in order that".

Ille ēmendās mendās. --> Ille ēmendāt mendās.

Ostīgens [???] prōficit. In the German edition there is "Diligens".
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Sun Apr 02, 2017 8:21 pm

Bedwere, your corrections have now been included. Also, I have now finished the second chapter up through plantārum. As will be evidenced, the German/Polish adds a lot of words, many of which are awesome and useful. On the other hand, a lot of strange words I'm unsure about.

Gratias maximas tibi ago propter multa facta tua pro me.
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby bedwere » Tue Apr 04, 2017 9:06 pm

Cum aperītur ōstium transa (?) --> Cum aperītur ōstium transi.
Tegitibus (?) nōs integimus, --? Tegetibus nōs integimus.
Et secussus (?) prō alvō levandā --> Et sēcessus prō alvō levandā :wink:

collaria would be collars, rather than scarves. In the Renaissance were separate from shirts.

Ancillae acillantur. --> Ancillae ancillantur.
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Wed Apr 05, 2017 12:38 pm

Updates made.
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby bedwere » Thu Apr 06, 2017 4:24 pm

VI

Nam quod nōn ūnī propium est, est commūne. --> Nam quod nōn ūnī proprium est, est commūne
Exercit (?) religiōnem. --> Exercet religiōnem.
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Thu Apr 06, 2017 7:01 pm

Thanks again, Bedwere! I made the changes indicated and am also now finished with chapter two up to opificum. The second chapter is massively expanded.

Gratias iterum tibi ago, Bedwere! Mutavi indicata et caput secudum etiam usque ad "opificum" terminavi. Caput secundum multo extenditur.
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby bedwere » Sun Apr 09, 2017 9:37 pm

VII

Occultā celā (?) --> Occulta cēlā (puto :wink: )


Sī quid vīs cōnārī, dēbēs prius contārī (?). contor-->cunctor
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Mon Apr 10, 2017 3:09 pm

Question: what does occulta cela mean? I understand occulta means hide. Cela also seems like an imperative, so I don't understand the sense of the whole.
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Timothée » Mon Apr 10, 2017 4:15 pm

Occultus 3 means ‘secret’, and from it neuter plural occulta, which you’ll probably find separately in your dictionary. Cēlāre could be translated e.g. ‘to keep (something) secret’. Therefore ‘keep the secrets secret’ uel sim. Occulta can mean not only ‘secrets’ but also ‘hiding places; caches’, depending on the context, of course.
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Tue Apr 11, 2017 4:24 pm

Thanks for the explanation! I appreciate it.
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Sat Apr 22, 2017 4:54 pm

I have now finished adding all the new words in for caput secundum. It took a long time! There are a lot of new words. Unfortunately, some of the words are somewhat obscure (at least relative to what you usually read), and so there is a lot that is need of correction.

Hope Bedwere or anyone else who's willing can look over it!
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Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby bedwere » Sat Apr 22, 2017 8:36 pm

Image
Starr 070730-7934 Dianthus caryophyllus [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], by Forest & Kim Starr, from Wikimedia Commons
serviae is the same as serivae

Image
Plantenschat1898 106 48 Mattebies.—Scirpus lacustris [Public domain], by Frederike J. Uildriks, Vitus Bruinsma (derived from original file in archive.org), from Wikimedia Commons

Holitor culīnae ferit (?) holera: --> Holitor culīnae serit holera:
lens is lentil

Image
Humulus Lupulus [CC BY-SA 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], by No machine-readable author provided. Hagen Graebner assumed (based on copyright claims)., from Wikimedia Commons

Image
Linaria cannabina -England -male-8 [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], by Joe Pell (Linnet 2

Uploaded by snowmanradio), from Wikimedia Commons

bucca screat: the mouth hems (hawks) ? the mouth makes a "hem" sound ?

dormiturio desiderative verb, I desire to sleep.

Circummūnit pōmārium vel viridārium fossā vel plancīs māceriā.

Posteā pinsit (?) (coquit) in furnō pānem. Maybe a metonymy?

Spīrās et placentās praeter obeliās et teganitās (?) Twisted cakes and normal cakes besides rolls and pancakes.

Secat seculā aut falce faenum et chordum (?) in prātō. Check foenum chordum in Forcellini. I guess it's a late hay. Are there any farmers in Iowa you may ask? :D

Image
Fundulus catenatus [Public domain], by Noel Burkhead, USGS, from Wikimedia Commons

Iō (?) olla offās, halecēs, petasōnēs, tomācula (macrons?), apexabōnēs, aliaque faresmina (???): --> In ollā offās, halecēs, petasōnēs, tomācula, apexabōnēs, aliaque farcīmina : In the pot &c.

Carnēs item ēlixas et iurulentas. Boiled meats and juicy meats.

Ex uvīs sit vīnum. --> Ex uvīs fit vīnum. (Careful with those f's and s's...).

It sine saltū(?) per sēmintam. --> It sine saltū per sēmitam.

Netrix ad cōlum net ē līnō. A spinstress at the distaff spins out of the flax .

Lignātor ferra (?) secat et secūrī findit ligna. --> Lignātor serrā secat et secūrī findit ligna. (ditto! :D )

murarius and vitrarius are not classical, but not bad words.

vietor
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Sat Apr 22, 2017 10:42 pm

Thanks so much for your help! A couple additional questions.

Can you check my translation of "Ex quibus ferta (?), corōnae et serīvae plectuntur." I particularly don't know what ferta is supposed to be doing here.

For "pinsit" should I just leave cook?

I don't really understand this sentence: "Et quae sunt assārum assātūrārumque genera alia. (?)"

Is embammata sauce?

"Nummī, grossī (?) et florenī (macrons?) sunt dīversī:" What are grossī and are florenī florens?

Could you confirm this translation? "Textor texit linteum tēlam."

"Mēnsūratque ulnā manicās et periscelidēs." Is ulna the measurement, i.e., a cubit?

Muriārius-- wall-builder?

Vitriārius-- Quid est?

Again, many thanks for all of your help. I can't wait to be done with this and get some recordings made.
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby bedwere » Sat Apr 22, 2017 11:33 pm

Can you check my translation of "Ex quibus ferta (?), corōnae et serīvae plectuntur." I particularly don't know what ferta is supposed to be doing here.



Not ferta (those peskies f's and s's :wink: ), but serta

Please post your translation, if you still have doubts.

For "pinsit" should I just leave cook?
bakes? The German has backet...

I don't really understand this sentence: "Et quae sunt assārum assātūrārumque genera alia. (?)"


Here we have assus,a,um and assatura.
And those which are the other kinds or roasted and broiled meats.

Is embammata sauce?

Yes.

"Nummī, grossī (?) et florenī (macrons?) sunt dīversī:" What are grossī and are florenī florens?


Grossus, Guilder. Send me some, please! :D

A spinstress at the distaff spind out of the flax. --> A spinstress at the distaff spins out of the flax.

Could you confirm this translation? "Textor texit linteum tēlam."

No, they are synonyms. Textor texit linteum (tēlam.) Try again. It should be obvious now.

"Mēnsūratque ulnā manicās et periscelidēs." Is ulna the measurement, i.e., a cubit?


Apparently ulna is a fathom. Cubitum is cubit. I guess here you can translate it with elbow.

Muriārius-- wall-builder?
Stonemason?
Vitriārius-- Quid est?
Qui conficit vitrum.
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Timothée » Sun Apr 23, 2017 1:24 pm

I slightly fear again that all the corrections have not yet been added to the document you give above in a link, or that that’s not the latest version. We may do the same work twice. Do check that you give us the newest link to your document. In any case, I started from the end towards the beginning (until the beginning of the fifth chapter). I do not claim to have spotted everything spotworthy, and I do hope I have not added a new stratum of errors.

E: Vērāx studet vēritātī. Better to translate studet ‘strives for/pursues’ I think.
E: Maestos sōlātur. → Maestōs
E: Egēnīs opitulātur. → Egentibus (from egēns)
E: Superiōribus estō obēdiēns. → oboediēns
E: Quōs patiens patitur. → patiēns. This is a recurrent mistake: remember that the vowel is long before ns and nf. Also ponder a little more the translation: patiēns maybe ‘suffering’ (other possibilities, too). The modern sense ‘patient’ is met in French and then in English (in Chaucer!), first in the 14th century. It may not be best here.
E: Fortūna est incōnstans. → incōnstāns
E: Cum egēs, nē pigeat poscere. → pōscere
E: Bona fāma est ingens glōria. → ingēns
E: Nec sīs arrogans aut superbus. → arrogāns
E: Cum tibi quid dīcit auscultā. → tibī. Tibī and mihī can have both -ī and -ĭ, so this isn’t actually a mistake. However maybe best mark the macron, knowing that word-ending long vowel may shorten in fact more generally (such as -ō in 1st person singular and nouns).
E: Manifesta nārrā. → narrā. This length on the stem is somewhat contested. I do think it’s short (so also Ernout—Meillet, de Vaan), as it derives from gnārus (viz. *nārāre > narrāre), but we cannot be 100 % sure.
E: Ieiūnāre aliquandō expedit. → Iēiūnāre
E: Estō temperans. → temperāns.
E: Ut prūdens sīs, prōspice fīnem. → prūdēns
E: Patrans flāgitia est scelestus. → patrāns
E: Vītā vitia quae lex vetat. → lēx
E: Cum proeliantur et pugnant. → pūgnant (probably so)
E: Ut rex in regnō regnet. → rēx
E: Aedituus pulsat campanās. → campānās (I think there’s the word campanile in Italian, also used as a surname [famous scholar Enrico Campanile].)
E: Tabellārius fert līterās. No mistake but note the variation that exists, līterās ~ litterās, which might be marked.
E: Infunde in pōculum. → Īnfunde
E: Tolle patinās. I think patina means rather ‘bowl, dish’.
E: Muscas abige muscāriō. → Muscās
E: Ad iūsculum et pulmentum est cochlear. Consider still the translation of pulmentum. LS gives ‘anything eaten with bread, a sauce, condiment, relish (fruit, vegetables, salt etc.); transf. food’
E: Mappā sternimus mensam. → mēnsam
E: Lingulīs astringimus. I don’t know exactly how to translate lingula, which you should maybe check. It literally means ‘small tongue’, and could possibly refer to a shoe (flap of a shoe?).
E: Pilleī et collāria, chirotecae, et sandalia sunt honestātis ergō. → chīrothēcae (I think the Greek word would be *χειροθήκη [cf. ἀποθήκη], though LSJ wouldn’t appear to have it.). Only while composing this message I noticed that Bedwere had commented on this sentence a while ago. Yes, collāria ‘collars’, and honestātis ergō rather ‘for the sake of decency/morality’.
E: Indūsium et tunicam, thōrācem, femorālia, et tibiālia induimus at exuimus. — I found this difficult because people clothed differently in the Classical Antiquity from the Renaissance, and today we wear different clothes from the Renaissance. Therefore the equivalences are not expected to be exact between the garments. But my dictionary translates indūsium ‘dress, frock (the latter a slightly dated word in English?)’, tunica ‘blouse, shirt’, and thōrāx (< Greek θώραξ) ‘armour’ (the “doublet” you give is a synonym of “armour”?).
E: Quisquliiae verruntur scōpīs. → Quisquiliae. Also maybe rather ‘with a broom’.
E: Thūre suffimus. → Tūre suffīmus. From tūs. This correction might be slightly contested, as it is from Greek θύος. However, all the dictionaries (including the OLD) I checked had the lemma without an h.
E: Et sēcussu prō alvō levandā. → sēcessus (Bedwere mentioned this earlier in the thread). Also alvus means rather ‘stomach’, though you may have translated it in idiomatic English.
E: Matula est prō ūrīnā. You translate matula ‘urinal’, but doesn’t this word refer rather to public lavatories etc.? Better I think ‘chamber-pot’ (a pot that used to be used in olden days during nighttime, often kept under the bed).
E: Historicus rēs gestās nārrat. → narrat (see above). You translate rēs gestae ‘things done’, which is not incorrect, but it’s a current phrase meaning ‘deeds, feats, achievements’ etc., I think better here.
E: Negligens vāpulat. → Negligēns
E: Ille ēmendāt mendās. → ēmendat
E: Magister īnstituit ūniversōs. You translate ūniversī simply ‘everyone’, but maybe better ‘all together, everyone together’ (Swedish allihop :wink: ).
E: Cūstōs monet et cōnsignat. → Cŭstōs. Monet can also be translated ‘punishes’ (choose the best translation, but it might work). Cōnsignāre is derived from signum (slightly contested length of i, but maybe ĭ, as we do have sĭgillum) and means ‘to seal; to mark; to write down’. Cŭstōs can be translated e.g. ‘supervisor, invigilator’, but your “tutor” may also be perfectly good, and my English somewhat fails me with the nuances of these words.
E: Rēctor regit acadēmiam. → acadēmīam (< Greek Ἀκαδήμεια)

In coitū canuntur psalmī et hymnī. — No mistake here, but I just wanted to mention this sentence. Some people could’ve translated it differently and still considered it made sense...
Last edited by Timothée on Sun Apr 23, 2017 6:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Sun Apr 23, 2017 6:30 pm

bedwere wrote:
Could you confirm this translation? "Textor texit linteum tēlam."

No, they are synonyms. Textor texit linteum (tēlam.) Try again. It should be obvious now.

Ne habeas iram mecum!

I feel like an idiot. It seems like the most likely translation given the context is that tēla is either a weaver's beam or the warp or maybe a pattern, whereas linteum is linen, no?

Timothee, thank you for your suggestions and especially for your critique. Thank you to all helping, especially for your patience!
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby bedwere » Sun Apr 23, 2017 6:44 pm

The weaver weaves a linen cloth (a web).

Vale!
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Sun Apr 23, 2017 7:14 pm

Timothee, all your changes have been added, including changing ans to āns and ens to ēns.

I'd like your opinion on two phrases in the work.

Cūstōs monet et cōnsignat -- A tutor warns and sets down. [writes down?]

In cubiculō sunt lēctī pulvīnāribus (?) strātī.-- In a room there are beds covered with cushions. [pulvīnar can be a pillow as well, correct?)

Thanks for your help again. I hope my hard work (and yours, as well) will be useful to someone other than myself in the end.
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Timothée » Sun Apr 23, 2017 7:36 pm

E: Scholasticus frequentat scholam. I do think scholasticus means ‘pupil’ or ‘schoolboy’/‘schoolchild’, not ‘scholar’.
E: quō in artibus ērudiātur. Translates ‘so that he would be taught (subjunctive) in arts’. “Arts” is once again artēs līberālēs, I think.
E: Quīnque sēnsus. → sēnsūs (4th declension!)
E: Duo sunt testāmenta, Vetus et Novum. → tēstāmenta. The length of ē is quite certain, from Oscan evidence particularly.
E: Tentā igitur. Not wrong per se, but variant temptāre may be commoner or more original as classical form. Both could be marked.
E: Scīs numerāre. Add question mark as you have in the English.
E: Vērum propter exemplum cēterōrum nōn potest recipī. Frankly, I had to think of this quite lot. ‘But/However he cannot be taken/held as an example for others.’ German did help...
E: Extrā patriam vagans. → vagāns
E: Nāvigābant trans mare. → trāns
E: Iuxtā viam currens, cītrā stagnum cōnstitit. → Iūxtā viam currēns, cĭtrā — —. (Note all the lengths.) You translate iūxtā ‘near’, but it’s rather ‘along’.
E: Quia est palam. Palam means something like ‘in public’, ‘publicly’. The Germano-Polish version has Duia (sic!) est palam multīs ‘As it’s clear to many’.
E: Apud altare sacerdōs habet penes sē diāconum. → altāre. Translate penes sē ‘with him’/‘by his side’.
E: Secundum flūmen facile est nature. → natāre. Also secundum flūmen more idiomatically ‘downstream’ (and in the following sentence then logically ‘upstream’).
E: Egō. Not wrong, but note and possibly mark that it has both lengths, egō and egŏ.
E: Expectēmus donec veniat. → dōnec
E: Quorsum vīs. → Quōrsum
E: Nusquam → Nūsquam
E: Sīc satis, egō minimē, neutiquam. Egō see above. Also, you forgot to translate the egō ‘I not at all’.
E: Mihi nunc nōn vacas. → vacās → vacat (so has the Germano-Polish edition). It translates ‘I don’t have time now’ / ‘I cannot right now’. Also mihī, see my previous post.
E: Fortasse, sed vix. → Fortāsse
E: Eho, dubitās? Eho translates e.g. ‘Hey’; the OLD says that it is “used to attract the attention of the person addressed”.
E: Ceu sūtōrēs? Maybe change the exclamation mark to a full stop: ‘As cobblers’.
E: Atqui sumus sōlī. → Atquī. Also, it means rather ‘and yet’ / ‘but despite that’ uel sim.
E: Quōmodo lūdēmus? It’s not a subjunctive, so perhaps ‘How shall we play?’ or what is idiomatic in English.
E: Atqui sunt fēriae. → Atquī. Also note the plūrāle tantum word fēriae: ‘but it’s still festival’.
E: Nunc tibi parvās vōculās expōnam. → tibī (check the remark above).
E: Pōne nōs raptāmus. You translate “We snatch behind us”, but it’s rather ‘We drag behind us’ or something like that. Note the (at least originally) frequentative suffix in raptāre < rapere.

I know it’s much work, but you should update your document (and your links!). And as Bedwere said, it’d be best if you made the additions from the Germano-Polish edition. It would seem to have quite a lot more that the one you have mostly used, the reason for which I don’t quite know.
Last edited by Timothée on Sun Apr 23, 2017 8:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Timothée » Sun Apr 23, 2017 7:58 pm

Ursinus wrote:Cūstōs monet et cōnsignat

You say you updated it but still have the ū in custōs. There’s no reason for ū. I gave some discussion on this sentence, did you read it?

Ursinus wrote:In cubiculō sunt lēctī pulvīnāribus (?) strātī

It should be lĕctus (so different from the passive participle lēctus). Cubiculum is ‘bedroom’. Theoretically pulvīnar should be ‘couch’, ‘chaise longue’, but here it is surely pillow as you suggest, or cushion (I don’t know if they mean the same in English or not). By the way, the Germano-Polish edition has In cubiculo sunt lecti, culcitis, pulvinaribus et lodicibus strati.
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Sun Apr 23, 2017 8:03 pm

Timothée wrote:
Ursinus wrote:Cūstōs monet et cōnsignat

You say you updated it but still have the ū in custōs. There’s no reason for ū. I gave some discussion on this sentence, did you read it?


Mea culpa. I skipped over it.
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Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Sun Apr 23, 2017 8:37 pm

Timothee, actually I am in the process of adding everything from the Polish/German edition. As you indicated, there's a lot more in it. I have only gotten through the second chapter thus far.

I'll check the link. It seems to have updated for Bedwere, since he was responding to new material. I had already update my mihi's to mihī, tibi's to tibī, and other corrections. Perhaps, it takes a second to update, but I have made all the corrections you have suggested.

Edit: I checked to link and it seems that it is updating every time I make an edit.
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Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Mon Apr 24, 2017 3:59 pm

Caput tertium is now revised and expanded in accordance with the Polish/German/Latin edition. Not nearly as much work as capitulum secundum.
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Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Mon Apr 24, 2017 4:28 pm

Caput quartum now also finished. If this rate continues, I should be able to finish soon.
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Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby bedwere » Mon Apr 24, 2017 4:52 pm

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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby bedwere » Mon Apr 24, 2017 6:38 pm

calamarius, a, um

Interdum in schedā et palmpsēstō. --> Interdum in schedā et palimpsēstō.

You can translate didactrum as teacher's fee (δίδακτρα).
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Re: Help! Comenius Vestibulum

Postby Ursinus » Mon Apr 24, 2017 7:23 pm

Bedwere, I'll add your corrections after class. Also, caput quintum is now done. Only two more to go!
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