Textkit Logo

sentences confirmation

Here's where you can discuss all things Latin. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get translation help and more!

Moderator: thesaurus

sentences confirmation

Postby caeruleus » Thu Apr 29, 2004 5:29 pm

[face=Verdana]Forum:

Yes, can someone confirm the correctness of these first seven out of fourteen sentences (final seven in another e-mail titled, "sentences confirmation 2"):

1. The house is small, but it is pretty.
-- Casa est parva, sed pulchra est.

2. The girls are angry about the story.
-- Puellae iratae sunt de fabula.

3. The stories are new.
-- Fabulae novae sunt.

4. We are telling tales to the little girls.
-- Narramus puellae parvae fabulas.

5. Minerva walks on earth in the form of a woman.
-- Minerva in terra ambulat in forma feminae.

6. "No one is my teacher; I teach myself," said Arachne.
-- Arachne clamat, "Nemo mihi magistra est; me doceo."

7. The Goddess is trying to teach the rash girl.
-- Dea puellam temerarium docere temptat.[/face]

Caeruleus
caeruleus
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Fri Dec 05, 2003 1:08 am
Location: U.S.A.

Postby phil » Thu Apr 29, 2004 8:18 pm

#1-5 I can find no fault with, #6, I'm not sure about 'clamat', which means more to call/shout out. How about 'inquit'? (It pops up a lot in Harrius Potter) #7 should be temerariam, but I suspect that this is just a typo.
phil
Textkit Fan
 
Posts: 254
Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2003 2:01 am
Location: Wellington, New Zealand

Re: sentences confirmation

Postby benissimus » Fri Apr 30, 2004 2:47 am

I have just one error to add and a little advice,

2. The girls are angry about the story.
-- Puellae iratae sunt de fabula.
This is perfectly correct, but typical order would put any adverbial phrases before the verb, Puellae iratae de fabula sunt or Puellae de fabula sunt iratae. You should try to follow normal word order as much as possible so that when you do make an exception it actually stands out.

4. We are telling tales to the little girls.
-- Narramus puellae parvae fabulas.
Girls is plural, so change the singular dative puellae parvae to a plural dative.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California

Postby MickeyV » Sun May 02, 2004 5:10 pm

And in 5 you should drop the prep. "in" in "in forma".

Add.: you may wonder why. Herefore, that, "in the form of a woman" indicates a vague sense of manner in which (how, in what fashion, by what faculty does she walk? ) Thus, an instrumental ablative should be employed, which suffers no prepositions, except sometimes "cum". "In" with the ablative is only used to indicate place where (not: time when, which refuses "in"), or circumstance under which. :)
Last edited by MickeyV on Sun May 02, 2004 5:26 pm, edited 2 times in total.
MickeyV
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 67
Joined: Sun Aug 31, 2003 3:29 pm
Location: The Netherlands

Postby MickeyV » Sun May 02, 2004 5:20 pm

Another:

in 1, you should preferably use "est" only once. -> "Case parva, sed pulchra est." In fact, you may drop "est" altogether. When a form of "esse" in the indicative functions as a copula, it is often omitted. -> casa parva, sed pulchra.

in 6 you should make some changes: it should be -> "mea nemo est magistra, me ipsa doceo". Why? The dative of possession is used, not to emphasize to whom something or someone belongs, but to stress the thing or person owned. Yet in this case, the person to whom (doesn't) belong(s) is the focal point: Arachne is indicating "no one is my master, I am my own master", not "I don't have a master (as opposed to something else), etc". The place of the possessive pronoun is free, yet primary position seems sensible, to even more emphasize the negation of possession.

"ipsa" should be added, to intensify the idea of autonomous action.

Add.: to elaborate on "ipsa" -> without ipsa the sentence "me doceo" would simply, casually assert a fact: I teach myself. But, mindful of the context, we can see, that Arachne is not making a neutral assertion of fact. She is contrasting that fact with a contrary idea (that someone else would be her master). Therefore, to express this contrast, she should stress that element, which forms the contrast.
MickeyV
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 67
Joined: Sun Aug 31, 2003 3:29 pm
Location: The Netherlands

Postby MickeyV » Sun May 02, 2004 5:43 pm

Hmm, I'm having second thoughts on "ipsa". Although what I said about contrasting holds good, it would, in this case, be more aptly expressed, not by "ipsa", but simply by "ego". -> "ego me doceo". Why? Because the contrast consists in, not so much, that Arachne teaches herself all by herself, of her own accord", but herein, that, of course, Arachne, and no one else, is her teacher: "I teach myself".

That at least seems sensible to me. :)
MickeyV
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 67
Joined: Sun Aug 31, 2003 3:29 pm
Location: The Netherlands


Return to Learning Latin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 48 guests