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HELP! groton and may chapter 37

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HELP! groton and may chapter 37

Postby polkmn » Sun Apr 18, 2004 8:26 pm

hello guys, i'm new to the board and was wondering if you guys could help me out. I'm having a lot of trouble translating the story Horace Meets a Boorish Fellow, if anyone could help me out with any part of the story i would be very thankful.
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Postby phil » Sun Apr 18, 2004 8:52 pm

These are the 38 Latin stories, right? Let me know what you're having problems with, (at least show what you've already got) and I'll try to fill in the blanks for you. Not till tomorrow though, as I've left my copy at home.
Cheers
Phil
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Postby polkmn » Mon Apr 19, 2004 11:52 pm

hello phil,
i am having problems with the whole passage. i understand some parts of a sentence but can't make it out completly. for example in the first sentence i don't understand the meaning of (ut soleo) or the second sentence (raptaque manu). If you could help me out with any of this passage it would help me out alot. thanks
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Postby phil » Tue Apr 20, 2004 12:12 am

The first two sentences, for those who don't have access to the source code:
Ibam Via Sacra, ut soleo, cogitans de rebus meis. Occurrit quidam notus mihi, nomine tantum, raptaque manu, "Quid agis?" ait.
OK 'ut' is one of those dreadful words like 'modo' with about two hundred meanings. In this case, it means 'just as'. Soleo, solere means to be accustomed to/ to be used to, so ut soleo means something like 'as I usually do'.
raptaque manu. the -que I'm sure you picked up is just a tacked-on 'and'. Tacked onto rapta, (rapio, ere, rapui, raptum). it agrees with manu (fem sing abl), and forms an ablative absolute (and having been snatched/seized/grabbed by the hand)
So the whole sentence, translated into English would perhaps read:
'So there I was, right, just cruisin' down the road, minding my own, ya dig, and this dude I hardly even know, right, grabs me by the arm and goes like"wassup, dog?"
hth :lol:
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Postby klewlis » Tue Apr 20, 2004 1:13 am

phil wrote:So the whole sentence, translated into English would perhaps read:
'So there I was, right, just cruisin' down the road, minding my own, ya dig, and this dude I hardly even know, right, grabs me by the arm and goes like"wassup, dog?"
hth :lol:


lol. love the "free" translation. :P
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having trouble too

Postby gfreek3 » Tue Apr 20, 2004 11:23 pm

yeah im having trouble with that chapter too (so many definitions for each word!) and was wondering if you know of a place where I can find a complete answer key for teh book.

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