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More Medieval/Scholastic Latin

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More Medieval/Scholastic Latin

Postby mjdubroy » Thu Oct 24, 2013 12:41 am

A sentence from Albertus Magnus:

"Amplius, quidquid est causa gubernationis et motus alicuius corporis, absque eo quod virtutem vel gubernationis et motus formam accipiat ab eo, secundum esse et essentiam separatur ab ipso quod sic gubernat."

I can't quite figure out what the pronouns refer to: eo, eo, and ipso are all Masculine. It seems grammatically possible for it to refer back to motus but that doesn't make any sense in the middle clause.

My take so far:
"Further, whatever is the cause of governing and motion of some body, without ____ which the power or form of governing and motion would receive by _____, according to being and essence it (the cause) is separated by ____ which it (the cause) governs thus."
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Re: More Medieval/Scholastic Latin

Postby bedwere » Thu Oct 24, 2013 1:13 am

They are all neutral (and not masculine) and can be translated with that/it. They refer to quidquid and to corpus.

Further, whatever is the cause of governing and motion of some body, apart from that which receives power or form of governing and motion from it, according to being and essence it is separated from it which governs thus.
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Re: More Medieval/Scholastic Latin

Postby Iacobus de Indianius » Fri Oct 25, 2013 12:47 am

Do you have a link you could share to the Magnus, mjdubroy? I'm interested in reading some of his stuff but can't seem to ever find it.
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Re: More Medieval/Scholastic Latin

Postby mjdubroy » Fri Oct 25, 2013 2:17 am

Certainly though I think the text I am using is from this (handed out by my professor): http://urts173.uni-trier.de/albertusmag ... sers/login

I think these are some high quality documents to read:

here is the homepage: http://albertusmagnus.uwaterloo.ca/newFiles/index.html

And then of course where all the pdfs are to download: http://albertusmagnus.uwaterloo.ca/newF ... ading.html
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Re: More Medieval/Scholastic Latin

Postby Iacobus de Indianius » Fri Oct 25, 2013 4:17 pm

mjdubroy wrote:Certainly though I think the text I am using is from this (handed out by my professor): http://urts173.uni-trier.de/albertusmag ... sers/login

I think these are some high quality documents to read:

here is the homepage: http://albertusmagnus.uwaterloo.ca/newFiles/index.html

And then of course where all the pdfs are to download: http://albertusmagnus.uwaterloo.ca/newF ... ading.html


multas gratias!
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Re: More Medieval/Scholastic Latin

Postby Vladimir » Sat Oct 11, 2014 7:21 pm

What dictionaries of Medieval Latin can be found in the Internet? I have a Latin-French dictionary of medieval authors by Albert Blaise, but I cannot find there all the words I need. Now I am trying to translate the following song:

Stella splendens in monte ut solis radium
miraculis serrato exaudi populum.

Concurrunt universi gaudentes populi
divites et egeni grandes et parvuli
ipsum ingrediuntur ut cernunt oculi
et inde revertuntur gracijis repleti.

Principes et magnates extirpe regia
saeculi potestates obtenta venia
peccaminum proclamant tundentes pectora
poplite flexo clamant hic: Ave Maria.

Prelati et barones comites incliti
religiosi omnes atque presbyteri
milites mercatores cives marinari
burgenses piscatores praemiantur ibi.

Rustici aratores nec non notarii
advocati scultores cuncti ligni fabri
sartores et sutores nec non lanifici
artifices et omnes gratulantur ibi.

Reginae comitissae illustres dominae
potentes et ancillae juvenes parvulae
virgines et antiquae pariter viduae
conscendunt et hunc montem et religiosae.

Coetus hic aggregantur hic ut exhibeant
vota regratiantur ut ipsa et reddant
aulam istam ditantes hoc cuncti videant
jocalibus ornantes soluti redeant.

Cuncti ergo precantes sexus utriusque
mentes nostras mundantes oremus devote
virginem gloriosam matrem clementiae
in coelis gratiosam sentiamus vere.

That is to say I know the translation in general because there is one on the web, but I would like to know the meaning of each word and anlyze its grammatical form. For example, what does serrato mean? I have not found a meaning that would be suitable in this context. I cannot even understand what it is grammatically. It looks like an ablativus or dativus singularis of the second declension but such a form seems to have no sense here.
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Re: More Medieval/Scholastic Latin

Postby bedwere » Sat Oct 11, 2014 9:11 pm

There is the Glossarium mediae et infimae Latinitatis, but I'm not an expert.

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Re: More Medieval/Scholastic Latin

Postby Victor » Sun Oct 12, 2014 12:11 am

Vladimir wrote:For example, what does serrato mean?

One explanation is that it's Serrato (with a capital S). Taken with monte it's a reference to Monte Serrato or Montserrat, the home of Santa María de Montserrat Abbey.
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Re: More Medieval/Scholastic Latin

Postby Vladimir » Sun Oct 12, 2014 1:06 am

And why is the star is said to be shining "ut solis radium" and not "radius"? Is it accusativus?
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Re: More Medieval/Scholastic Latin

Postby Victor » Sun Oct 12, 2014 1:48 pm

Vladimir wrote:And why is the star is said to be shining "ut solis radium" and not "radius"?

Presumably so that the final syllable of the line harmonises with that of the next. Neuters were generally lost, not gained, as Latin evolved towards Romance.
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