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two short sentences

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two short sentences

Postby franciscus » Thu Aug 01, 2013 12:43 am

Y'all, could you help with these two statements?

1. Genius is judiciously rejecting or accepting common sense. My attempt: Genius est cum sapiens denegare atque eligere sensum communis.
2. Love will tear us apart (as in tear us apart inside, not tear apart from one another). My attempt: Amor nos frangerit.

Gratia vobiscum y'all
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Re: two short sentences

Postby adrianus » Thu Aug 01, 2013 11:14 am

My attempt // En conatum meum.

cor habere = to have common sense

Cor populare bene dijudicare sapientis est.

Amor nos franget.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: two short sentences

Postby Qimmik » Thu Aug 01, 2013 12:22 pm

My thoughts:

Summi ingeni est sapienter [or perhaps prudenter?] communem opinionem aut reicere aut recipere.

Genius can mean something like "talent" but its basic meaning is the "spirit of a clan" (gens). It doesn't seem to have the English meaning of a person of supreme and transcendent intellectual faculties. I would suggest translating summi ingeni (genitive) + est . . .: "it is a characteristic of the highest intellect to . . . ".

Communis sensus is a Latin expression, but it seems to mean something more akin to "shared ethical values" than to widely shared beliefs.

Cor habere is an idiom meaning "to have common sense" in the sense of having innate good judgment. Here "common sense" means something slightly different--beliefs that are widely shared without much thought and may not necessarily be correct.

Some grammatical points: Cum would require a finite verb, not infinitives; sensum communis: the adjective must agree with the noun in case--sensum communem would be correct; sapiens: if the subject of infinitives, it would have to be accusative sapientem, or it might be an adverb sapienter--anything but nominative singular.

Amor nos diripiet.

The future of frango is, as Adrianus noted, franget. Future perfect would be fregerit.

Frango means "break"; "tear apart limb from limb": diripio.
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Re: two short sentences

Postby adrianus » Thu Aug 01, 2013 1:13 pm

I love "summi ingeni" // Valdè placet "summi ingeni".

Diripio is very nice but It is not wrong to translate "tear" or "tear in pieces" as "frangere".
Bonum diripio verbum. Et aptum non falsum "frango" pro "lacero, diripio, dilacero, scindo, conscindo, discindo, discerpo, concerpo, vello, evello".
Secundum dictionarium de Ainsworth, "I do not follow you to tear you in pieces" = "Non ego te frangere persequor."

cor = judgement or sense (+ heart + soul)
I translated // sic verti:
"cor populare" = "popular or common or typical judgement" or "common sense"
I could as easily have said "cor commune". // Aequè "cor commune" scriptum esset.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: two short sentences

Postby franciscus » Thu Aug 01, 2013 3:41 pm

Thanks y'all! Gratia vobis!
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