nekron Afrodith?

Here you can discuss all things Ancient Greek. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get help with a difficult passage of Greek, and more.
Post Reply
User avatar
mingshey
Textkit Zealot
Posts: 1338
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2003 6:38 am
Location: Seoul
Contact:

nekron Afrodith?

Post by mingshey » Sun Feb 29, 2004 3:39 am

from the "Visual Cue Cards to Accompany THE ANCIENT GREEKS SPEAK TO US" :
[face=SPIonic]nekro\n A)frodi/th Dionu/sou di/xa kai\ Dh/mhtroj.[/face]

[face=SPIonic]nekro/n[/face]: adj. dead, neut. sg.
[face=SPIonic]Afrodi/th[/face]: fem. sg.
[face=SPIonic]Dionu/sou[/face]: [face=SPIonic]Dio/nusoj[/face], masc. sg. gen.
[face=SPIonic]Dhmhtroj[/face]: [face=SPIonic]Dhmh/thr[/face], fem. sg. gen.
[face=SPIonic]di/xa[/face]: in two ways
[face=SPIonic]kai/[/face]: and

I can hardly find a match of grammatical construction in this proverb.

I think a possible interpretation is [face=SPIonic]nekro/n[/face] is not an adjective. But an acc. of [face=SPIonic]nekro/s[/face]. and [face=SPIonic]Afrodi/th[/face] in voc. Then it will be like :
"(oh) Aphrodite, death of both Dionysos and Demeter!" , which is still strange to think of.

chad
Textkit Zealot
Posts: 757
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 2:55 am

Post by chad » Sun Feb 29, 2004 4:14 am

what is that bizarre cuecard mingshey?!? :)

something like, aphrodite divided into 2 the body (and then something to do with dionysius and demeter?)

aphrodite obviously subject;
[face=SPIonic]di/xa[/face] the unaugmented homeric/ionic 3rd person singular imperfect of [face=SPIonic]dixa&w[/face], poetic for [face=SPIonic]dixa&zw[/face];
[face=SPIonic]nekro\n[/face] the masculine accusative of the (noun) [face=SPIonic]nekro/j[/face];
and then the genitive names, which would only make sense if you knew the relevant myth (i have no idea)... sorry i couldn't help...

User avatar
mingshey
Textkit Zealot
Posts: 1338
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2003 6:38 am
Location: Seoul
Contact:

Post by mingshey » Sun Feb 29, 2004 5:13 am

chad wrote:what is that bizarre cuecard mingshey?!? :)

It's something I got from the random internet search for something like greek flash cards, and I forgat where I did I get it.

something like, aphrodite divided into 2 the body (and then something to do with dionysius and demeter?)

aphrodite obviously subject;
Indeed! voc. without [face=SPIonic]w)=[/face] in such a strange place is odd.
[face=SPIonic]di/xa[/face] the unaugmented homeric/ionic 3rd person singular imperfect of [face=SPIonic]dixa&w[/face], poetic for [face=SPIonic]dixa&zw[/face];

I didn't think of that possibility. Thank you so much.

[face=SPIonic]nekro\n[/face] the masculine accusative of the (noun) [face=SPIonic]nekro/j[/face];
and then the genitive names, which would only make sense if you knew the relevant myth (i have no idea)... sorry i couldn't help...


Don't be sorry. It helped very much. I think dionysos represents wine and demeter grain. (now, whose body is it? of Venus herseelf? :roll: )The cue card has a trophy(of wine, methinks) and a sack of grain on the other side of a wall. A statue of venus lying on this side of the wall.

User avatar
mingshey
Textkit Zealot
Posts: 1338
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2003 6:38 am
Location: Seoul
Contact:

Post by mingshey » Sun Feb 29, 2004 5:37 am

chad wrote:what is that bizarre cuecard mingshey?!? :)


Look. I found it! It was in "Greek Teachers' Corner" which I found out by googling with "ancient Greek Teaching materials". (I don't remember if it was in the Outside Links forum.) See "Cue Cards" on the website.

Ptolemaios
Textkit Neophyte
Posts: 79
Joined: Mon Jul 21, 2003 7:15 am
Location: The Netherlands

Post by Ptolemaios » Mon Mar 01, 2004 8:12 am

According to the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae this is from Michael Apostolius Paroemiogr., Collectio paroemiarum: Centuria 12 section 2 line 1.

I think it means something like "Without Dionysos and Demeter Aphrodite is (just) a dead body."

Ptolemaios

User avatar
mingshey
Textkit Zealot
Posts: 1338
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2003 6:38 am
Location: Seoul
Contact:

Post by mingshey » Mon Mar 01, 2004 10:45 am

Ptolemaios wrote:According to the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae this is from Michael Apostolius Paroemiogr., Collectio paroemiarum: Centuria 12 section 2 line 1.

I think it means something like "Without Dionysos and Demeter Aphrodite is (just) a dead body."

Ptolemaios


:o :D Wow, thanks!. That makes it much more clear! And, alas, why didn't I look closely at my middle liddell, saying that, with genitive, [face=SPIonic]di/xa[/face] means "apart from, differently from, unlike, against the will of, besides, except, ..."?

And it should be interpreted, "Without food and drink, love is a dead body"?

But then, how come nekron is in neuter accusative? If it is a noun in nominative, why isn't it nekros? Is there a noun like [face=SPIonic]sw=ma[/face] abbreviated?

Ptolemaios
Textkit Neophyte
Posts: 79
Joined: Mon Jul 21, 2003 7:15 am
Location: The Netherlands

Post by Ptolemaios » Mon Mar 01, 2004 2:10 pm

Nekron is nom.sg. Maybe 'something dead' is a better translation for nekron than my earlier 'dead body' (although ... wouldn't that be 'nekron ti'?).

Ptolemaios

User avatar
Skylax
Textkit Enthusiast
Posts: 672
Joined: Fri Jun 06, 2003 8:18 am
Location: Belgium

Post by Skylax » Sun Mar 07, 2004 4:50 pm

For [face=SPIonic]nekro/j, -a/, -o/n[/face] as an adjective, see LSJ s. v. [face=SPIonic]nekro/j[/face], II, with, for example, the phrase [face=SPIonic]nekra\ sw/mata[/face], "dead bodies". I had never seen that before, so thank you !

Post Reply