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the meaning of the plural form of cor

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the meaning of the plural form of cor

Postby Junya » Sun Aug 26, 2012 5:07 pm

Hi.

about Cor 1. heart / 2. heart (as the seat of feelings) / 3. mind (as the place of intellectual activity)

What does it mean when it is used in plural form and meaning the heart as the seat of feelings ?
Does it mean the heart of plural people ?
Or, can it mean the heart of one person ?
L&S gives no sample sentence for 2. and 3. with plural forms.

But pectus (1. chest / 2. heart as the seat of feelings) in plural form can mean the heart of one person.
OLD explains so. (Mr. Adrianus told me so last time.)
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Re: the meaning of the plural form of cor

Postby adrianus » Fri Aug 31, 2012 2:23 pm

I haven't OLD with me because I'm away but I think "corda" refers to "hearts" generally, in a broad sense meaning everyone's heart or "seat of feeling".

Exemplum OLD dictionarii ante oculos non habeo quod Turkiae sum at, ut opinor, numerus pluralis ad multos pertinet, scilicet corda pluralis numeri, sensu generale.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: the meaning of the plural form of cor

Postby Junya » Sat Sep 01, 2012 5:29 pm

Hi, Mr. Adrianus. :)
Could you check OLD and confirm your saying later ?
I'm not in a hurry.

Oh, you are in Turkey !
Then you go back home much much later...
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Re: the meaning of the plural form of cor

Postby adrianus » Mon Sep 03, 2012 7:17 am

Domum reditus sum et in OLD inquiro. De usu pluraliter pro numero singulari apud poetas, praeeuntia autem exempla ibi non inveni.
I'm back home, looking in OLD, but can't see examples to illustrate what it says about the plural usage in a singular sense with poets.
OLD wrote:cor cordis, n...N.B.: the pl. is often used in a sg. sense by poets.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: the meaning of the plural form of cor

Postby Junya » Mon Sep 03, 2012 6:50 pm

Thank you.
Do you remember any article on such plural usage in Gildersleeve ? You don't have to look into it. I do it. Just tell me only when you remember something or have some advices on researching about this problem.

Is it odd to call you "Mr. Adrianus" ?
You are much older than I, and I feel I have to show reverence in calling your name, but I don't know how to do so in English.
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Re: the meaning of the plural form of cor

Postby adrianus » Mon Sep 03, 2012 9:15 pm

Junya wrote:Do you remember any article on such plural usage in Gildersleeve ?
I don't, Junya.
Non memini, Junya.

Junya wrote:Is it odd to call you "Mr. Adrianus" ?
It's too odd in English, Junya,—a bit like a joke.
Sic facere anglicè, Junya, externius est, quasi irridere.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: the meaning of the plural form of cor

Postby Junya » Thu Sep 06, 2012 3:57 pm

Adrianus,

I looked into Gildersleeve, searching from the index by the keyword "plural",
but there was nothing more than the explanation given in your OLD.



I'm sorry for seeming rude to you, :oops:
but I hope you know I didn't mean it.
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Re: the meaning of the plural form of cor

Postby adrianus » Thu Sep 06, 2012 4:29 pm

Junya wrote:I'm sorry for seeming rude to you, :oops:
but I hope you know I didn't mean it.

I knew you didn't mean to be rude, of course, and it wasn't rude,—just a little odd here to say "Mr. Junya" or "Mister Adrianus".
Certùm scio te deformem esse non ausum esse. Nec deforme quod scripsisti,—modo alienum hîc "Domine Junya"/"Domine Adriane" dicere.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: the meaning of the plural form of cor

Postby Junya » Thu Sep 06, 2012 8:38 pm

Then could you tell me how one ought to call someone older here ?
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Re: the meaning of the plural form of cor

Postby NateD26 » Thu Sep 06, 2012 8:58 pm

Junya wrote:Then could you tell me how one ought to call someone older here ?

I would just call him adrianus as he calls you Junya with no added titles.
This is not a class where some degree of formality and hierarchy is required.
In addition, Age does not necessarily merit more respect or suggests being wiser than a younger
person. This is not to imply that adrianus is not wise or worthy of respect (he's proven his
worth countless times on this forum) but your question implied anyone older should automatically
be treated with the utmost respect and obedient deference.
Nate.
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Re: the meaning of the plural form of cor

Postby adrianus » Thu Sep 06, 2012 9:53 pm

Also much older people can as likely be demented as wise. We have to rely on what is said, not on who says it, unless that sounds demented to you.
Et cum homo extremam senectutis metam attingit, id ex facili fieri potest quod ille amens non sapiens sit. Id quod dicitur non eum qui dicit numera, nisi insanum hoc dictum tibi videatur.
Last edited by adrianus on Thu Sep 06, 2012 11:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: the meaning of the plural form of cor

Postby Junya » Thu Sep 06, 2012 10:04 pm

Thank you.

Then from now I call people here by name (handlename) with no regard to his age.
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Re: the meaning of the plural form of cor

Postby Junya » Tue Sep 11, 2012 3:34 pm

Hi Adrianus and Nate, :)

in Gildersleeve 204 note 5 it is wriiten
In Latin pl. of abstract substantives occurs more frequently than in English
adventus imperatorum
arrival(s) of generals (because there were several arrivals, or because they arrived at different times)


I feel a similar thing might be said about the pl. of cor.
If you feel the same as I, please suggest as many translations as possible of the pl. of cor (meaning heart as the seat of feelings).
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