Kai in lists

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Geoff
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Kai in lists

Post by Geoff » Tue Feb 03, 2004 10:58 pm

In greek syntax does the "kai" have to be present between each noun in a list or can it be as in english?

Fruit, bread, and meat

or

fruit (kai) bread (kai) meat

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klewlis
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Post by klewlis » Tue Feb 03, 2004 11:42 pm

The kai is usually there but I'm sure I've seen it omitted (though I can't think of specific references just now!).

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Kopio
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Post by Kopio » Tue Feb 17, 2004 7:46 am

Most of what I've seen is either with KAI's or without, usually not a combo of the two (as your example had)

Bullinger (whose Figures of Speech is a boon) pg. 137 calls these asundeton ("no-ands") and polysyndeton ("many-ands")

Of course, I speak primarily from a Biblical Greek perspective....there's a whole lot of Koine out there I haven't read.

Hope this helps.

kalowski
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Post by kalowski » Sun Nov 13, 2005 3:02 pm

Thank you, whither, for your valuable contribution.
phpbb

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Kopio
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Post by Kopio » Sun Nov 13, 2005 11:58 pm

I deleted it and I think we are going to kick him from the site.

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Skylax
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Post by Skylax » Wed Nov 16, 2005 3:20 pm

Kopio wrote:Of course, I speak primarily from a Biblical Greek perspective....there's a whole lot of Koine out there I haven't read.

Hope this helps.


This the normal usage in Ancient Greek.

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