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Titanic - Pervivet Pro Te Hoc Cor

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Titanic - Pervivet Pro Te Hoc Cor

Postby Gregorius » Sun Jun 10, 2012 4:26 pm

I was so thrilled to finally get this years-old adaptation of mine recorded that I just had to share it! I hope you enjoy it!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UqO2zGW1_5E
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Re: Titanic - Pervivet Pro Te Hoc Cor

Postby adrianus » Mon Jun 11, 2012 12:07 am

Benè factum est, Gregori. Macte!
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Titanic - Pervivet Pro Te Hoc Cor

Postby chodorov » Fri Jun 15, 2012 5:56 am

Wow, this was brilliant! I love seeing people who are good enough at Latin to do things like this. I hope I'll reach that level soon.
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Re: Titanic - Pervivet Pro Te Hoc Cor

Postby Anthony Appleyard » Thu Jun 28, 2012 5:44 am

A good song.

I noticed that the song routinely pronounces the word "sapio" = "I know" as two syllables "sapjo". This pronunciation seems to have been routine in spoken Late Latin (as shown by its outcomes in the derivative Romance languages); but it does not show in Latin hexameter verse.

I would imagine that one common problem in translating English songs into Latin is when the English song's tune ends each line with a stressed syllable.
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Re: Titanic - Pervivet Pro Te Hoc Cor

Postby Sceptra Tenens » Fri Jun 29, 2012 11:49 pm

Anthony Appleyard wrote:I noticed that the song routinely pronounces the word "sapio" = "I know" as two syllables "sapjo". This pronunciation seems to have been routine in spoken Late Latin (as shown by its outcomes in the derivative Romance languages); but it does not show in Latin hexameter verse.


It's not entirely without precedent to reduce the I, though. Vergil has lavinjaque venit, for example. I don't know how common it is outside of that line itself, though.
mihi iussa capessere fas est
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