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N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

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Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

Postby Amiros » Fri May 18, 2012 4:29 pm

Preliminary Exercise H (pt.2)

26. Into his alliance.
In societātem suam/eius.

27. Under the general himself.
Sub imperātōre ipsō.

28. At my house.
Domī meī. // In domō/domū meō. // Apud meum.

29. To go under the earth.
Sub terram īre.

30. About terms of peace.
Dē conditiōnibus pācis.

31. Before a year.
Ante annum.

32. Round about the city.
Circum orbem.

33. On this side of the mountain.
In hōc latere montis.

34. Besides the messenger.
Praeter/Extra nuntium.

35. Except the poet.
Praeter/Extra poētam.

(I couldn't be sure whether there was a difference between 'besides' and 'except' or not.)

36. Against Antiochus.
Adversum/contrā Antiochum.

37. About a thousand men.
Circā mille virī.

38. Around the mountain.
Circum montem.

39. Within the camp.
Intrā castra.

40. Outside the gates.
Extrā portās.

41. Bellow the city walls.
Sub mūrīs urbis.

42. In the power of the enemy.
Penes hostēs.

43. Behind the horsemen.
Post equēs.

44. According to the laws.
Dē lēgibus.

45. Contrary to the laws.
Contrā lēgēs.

46. Adjoining the camp.
Prope/Iūxtā castrōs.

47. As far as his head.
Capite suō/eius tenus.

48. Near the garden.
Prope/Iūxtā hortum.

49. The army was sent under the yoke.
Exercitus sub jugum missus est.

50. It lies under your eyes.
Sub oculōs tuōs jacet.
Latin: Trying to ge back to it. Again. (Again.)
Ancient Greek: Hoping to have time to get back to that in the future...
Other: Hebrew [native]; English [advanced]; German [advanced]; Palestinian Arabic [beginner]
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Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

Postby Sceptra Tenens » Fri May 18, 2012 8:43 pm

Amiros wrote:28. At my house.
Domī meī. // In domō/domū meō. // Apud meum.


Apud me, not meum. Also, domus is feminine - meae and mea.

Amiros wrote:30. About terms of peace.
Dē conditiōnibus pācis.


condiciōnibus

Amiros wrote:32. Round about the city.
Circum orbem.


urbem

Amiros wrote:33. On this side of the mountain.
In hōc latere montis.


Cis montem - cis means "this side of".

Amiros wrote:43. Behind the horsemen.
Post equēs.


equites

Amiros wrote:46. Adjoining the camp.
Prope/Iūxtā castrōs.


castra

Amiros wrote:50. It lies under your eyes.
Sub oculōs tuōs jacet.


oculis tuis

Amiros wrote:44. According to the laws.
Dē lēgibus.

45. Contrary to the laws.
Contrā lēgēs.


I'm not sure about the proper terms for these, actually.
Last edited by Sceptra Tenens on Sat May 19, 2012 4:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

Postby adrianus » Sat May 19, 2012 12:25 am

according to the laws = ad leges
contrary to the laws = adversus leges
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

Postby Amiros » Mon May 21, 2012 10:57 am

Preliminary Exercise H

1. He came into the city with ten soldiers.
In urbem vēnit cum decem mīlitibus.

2. After one night he set out against the enemy.
Post noctem ūnam contrā hostēs profectus est.

3. In front of the house there is a field.
Ante/Praeter domum ager est.

4. I cannot go across the sea without ships.
Trāns Marem sine nāvibus īre nōn possum.

5. He was killed by his brother at a feast, amid all his friends.
Ā frātre suō in cēnā interfectus est, cōram amīcīs suīs.

6. He spoke to me about your house in your presence.
Dē domū/domō tuā mihi cōram tuō locūtus est.

7. He went around the city, and saw the walls.
Circum urbem īvit et mūrōs vīdit.

8. He came towards me, and called out, "Who is in the city?"
Ad mē vēnit et clamāvit "Quis est in urbe?"

9. The camp is on the side of the river, the army is beyond the city.
Castra iūxtā flūmen est, exercitus suprā urbem est.

10. On account of the war no one goes outside the gates.
Propter bellum nēmō extrā portās it.

11. Besides these men we have no army in the city.
Praeter hōs virōs nūllum exercitum in urbe habēmus.

12. We saw him on the road.
In viā eum vīdīmus.

13. He was brought by the soldiers into the presence of the king.
Ā mīlitibus cōram rēge adlātus est.
("into the presence" seems a bit awkward to me, I tried to translate it as such.)

14. They escaped from prison without my knowledge.
Ē carcere sine scientiā meā exiērunt.

15. They sailed past the island in a boat.
Prope insulam rate nāvigāvērunt.

16. We sailed as far as Spain.
Tenus Hispaniā nāvigāvimus.

17. They live near the island of Corsica.
Prope insulam Corsicae habitant.
(Or should it be "Corsicam insulam"? I'm not sure if the form "the island of X" exists in Latin or not.)

18. He did this in sight of all.
In conspectū omnium hoc fēcit.

19. I did this because of my friendship towards you.
Hoc fēcī propter amīcitiam meam tibi.

20. Were you not going towards the city?
Nōnne ad urbem ībās?

21. Men who live underground.
Virī quī sub terrā habitant.

22. He led an army over the mountains against the enemy.
Exercitum super montēs contrā hostēs dūxit.

23. After the battle they were killed outside the city walls in the presence of their friends.
Post pugnam interfectī sunt extrā mūrōs urbis cōram amīcīs suīs.

24. Before daybreak they came close to (under) the walls of the town.
Ante primam lūcem sub mūrōs oppidī vēniērunt.

25. I killed him before these things, not on account of them.
Eum ante hās rēs interfēcī, nōn ob/propter eās.
Latin: Trying to ge back to it. Again. (Again.)
Ancient Greek: Hoping to have time to get back to that in the future...
Other: Hebrew [native]; English [advanced]; German [advanced]; Palestinian Arabic [beginner]
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Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

Postby Amiros » Wed Jun 13, 2012 7:40 am

So, after completing the preliminary exercises, I am now deep into the book. Thanks for all who helped: adrianus, Sceptra Tenens, MatthaeusLatinus, Craig_Thomas, Ulpianus, Gregarius and anyone whom I somehow missed. I appreciate it!

I will occasionally post here questions about things that I don't quite understand. This one is from exercise 8 (p.11, p.29 in the PDF):
4. He asked me so often that I gave him the book.

The answer given by the key is:
Toties me rogavit ut librum ei dederim.

My question is: why shouldn't rogavit be rogabat? I understand this as a recurring action, and therefore should be in the imperfect. Am I wrong here?
Latin: Trying to ge back to it. Again. (Again.)
Ancient Greek: Hoping to have time to get back to that in the future...
Other: Hebrew [native]; English [advanced]; German [advanced]; Palestinian Arabic [beginner]
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Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

Postby adrianus » Wed Jun 13, 2012 1:31 pm

Hoc propono. Toties me rogabat (tempus actioque imperfecta) ut librum ei donarer.
Toties me rogavit [tempus et actio perfecta] ut deinde librum ei dederim.


I would suggest this: He used to ask [/he asked] for the book so many times that I used to give it to me. [imperfect tense and uncompleted action]
He asked me so many times [perfect tense and completed action]that I gave it to me.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

Postby adrianus » Wed Jun 13, 2012 1:32 pm

Hoc propono. Toties me rogabat (tempus actioque imperfecta) ut librum ei donarer.
Toties me rogavit [tempus et actio perfecta in toto] ut [deinde] librum ei dederim.


I would suggest this: He used to ask [/he asked] for the book so many times that I used to give it to him. [imperfect tense and uncompleted action]
He asked me so many times [perfect tense and completed action seen as a whole] that I [finally] gave the book to him.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

Postby Amiros » Sun Jun 17, 2012 7:44 am

It seems to me that the key is wrong in this one here, from exercise 10 (p. 13, p. 31 in the PDF):

10. He was so hurt that he died.

And the answer given is:
Adeo laesus est ut mortuus sit.

Wouldn't it make more sense to use moreretur or mortuus fuerit, since the original is in the past tense?
Latin: Trying to ge back to it. Again. (Again.)
Ancient Greek: Hoping to have time to get back to that in the future...
Other: Hebrew [native]; English [advanced]; German [advanced]; Palestinian Arabic [beginner]
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Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

Postby Sceptra Tenens » Sun Jun 17, 2012 2:03 pm

Moreretur is fine, but not mortuus fuerit. But, the perfect subjunctive, mortuus sit, is also fine - Adler would say that it referred to something that recently happened. "He has (just recently) been so hurt that he has died".

Edit - changed "fit" to "sit"
Last edited by Sceptra Tenens on Mon Jun 18, 2012 6:05 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

Postby Amiros » Mon Jun 18, 2012 3:11 pm

Sceptra Tenens wrote:Moreretur is fine, but not mortuus fuerit. But, the perfect subjunctive, mortuus fit, is also fine - Adler would say that it referred to something that recently happened. "He has (just recently) been so hurt that he has died".

Yes, I meant the perfect subjunctive. It's confusing because the active is made with the perfect stem +erim/s/...
Latin: Trying to ge back to it. Again. (Again.)
Ancient Greek: Hoping to have time to get back to that in the future...
Other: Hebrew [native]; English [advanced]; German [advanced]; Palestinian Arabic [beginner]
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Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

Postby Sceptra Tenens » Mon Jun 18, 2012 6:08 pm

Pardon my typo - "mortuus sit" is the perfect, not "mortuus fit". I still hesitate before producing the active pluperfect and future perfect tenses, myself.
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Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

Postby Robertus » Sun Jan 05, 2014 12:20 pm

So I'm taking up where Amiros left off. I am not sure about the answers, so any follow up is appreciated :D .

26. ad eius (uel suam) societatem.
27. Sub ipso duce.
28. Apud me.
29. Sub terram ire.
30. De pacis conditionibus.
31. Ante annum.
32. Circa urbem.
33. Cis montem.
34. Juxta nuntium.
35. Praeter poetam.
36. Contra Antilochum.
37. Ad millia milites.
38. Circa montem.
39. In castra.
40. E portis.
41. Sub (uel subter) urbis muros.
42. Penes hostes.
43. Post equites.
44. Secundum leges.
45. Contra leges.
46. Juxta castra.
47. Usque ad caput.
48. Prope hortum.
49. Exercitus sub iugum missus est.
50. Ante oculos tuos.
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Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

Postby Robertus » Sun Jan 05, 2014 2:50 pm

Exercise K:

1. In urbem uenit cum decem militibus.
2. Post unam noctem profectus est contra hostes.
3. Campus est ante domum.
4. Per marem sine nauis transmere non possum.
5. In cena interfectus est a fratre suo inter omnes amicos suos.
6. Coram te mihi locutus est de domo tua.
7. Circa urbem iit et muros uidit.
8. Ad me uenit et clamauit "quis in urbe?".
9.Castra cis fluminem, exercitus ultra urbem.
10. Ob bellum nemo e portis exit.
11. Praeter hos milites, nullum exercitum habemus in urbe.
12. Eum in uia uidimus.
13. Ad regem allatus est ad regem.
14. E carcere mihi clam euaserunt.
15. Praeter insulam in lintre nauigauerunt.
16. Nauigauimus usque ad Hispaniam.
17. Habitant prope insulam Corsicae.
18. Hoc fecit prae omnibus.
19. Propter amicitiam tuam hoc feci.
20. Nonne ueniebas ad urbem?
21. Vires qui sub terra habitant.
22. Super montes exercitum duxit contra (uel aduersus) hostes.
23. Post proelium interfecti sunt extra muros coram amicis suis.
24. Ante primam lucem urbis ad muros uenerunt.
25. Ante haec eum interfeci, non propter haec.
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