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Greetings from China

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Greetings from China

Postby Ken_Teng » Tue Mar 02, 2004 3:14 am

Hi, I'm chinese sophomore majoring in EE. And I've got a strong interest in language learning and linguistic studies.

Could anybody here be so kind as to introduce to me a brief history of Greek and tell which genre or time period does the tutorials on this website belong to?
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Re: Greetings from China

Postby xn » Tue Mar 02, 2004 5:41 am

Ken_Teng,

welcome here! I don’t know much about Greek (and less still about Chinese :oops:), but the influence of the Greek culture of roughly 2,000 to 2,500 years ago (give or take a couple of centuries) was enormous on the rest of Western civilization: philosophy, religion, geometry, geography, astronomy, warfare, literature, poetry, pottery, and undoubtedly many other subjects have greatly benefited from Greek contributions. I’d guess that most of the tutorials here cover either “ancient” Greek (ca. 500 BC) or “Biblical” Greek (ca. 50 AD), but the students of Greek here will be able to answer more accurately than I’m able to.

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Postby mariek » Tue Mar 02, 2004 6:06 am


Hi Ken Teng,

Welcome to Textkit! Sorry, I can't help you there, I don't know much about Greek. I'm sure one of the other Greek learners here can give you more detail.

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Thanks

Postby Ken_Teng » Tue Mar 02, 2004 7:04 am

Boucoup de mercies pour votres reponces :)

In fact, I've learnt German, French, Japanese, Spanish and obtained certain amount of knowledge upon Esperanto, Korean, Latin and Greek. I'm now poring over Sanskrit, a language which probably all Indo-european languages bear relationship to.

The reason why I turned to ancient Greek and Latin is manifold, but the direct stimulus is a book compiled by a professor at Peking Uni., who researched into ancient Greek philosophy by means of comparing ancient Greek and Sanskrit, for example, 'Physics' and 'bhu', 'es'(ontology) and 'as' with the latter their Sankrit equivalents.

I'm sure, there's a thorny road before me in my pursuit of proficiency in Greek and Latin. And hence I hope I can get helps here and make as many friends as possible.
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Postby Raya » Tue Mar 02, 2004 8:46 am

Hi Ken Teng, and welcome! :)

Basically, Greek material here - as xn mentioned - relates either to Classical Greek (that spoken by the ancient Greeks) and Koine Greek (the Greek of the New Testament).
However, within the category of Classical Greek there are several dialects with fairly substantial differences between them. Most Classical Greek learners here are either studying Homeric dialect (used by Homer in his Iliad and Odyssey), or Attic dialect (used by most of the famous Greek writers: Xenophon, the philosophers, the dramatists, etc). Once you've got a solid base in Homeric or Attic it's not too hard to learn other dialects, but as for which one to start with - well, that depends on what you want to do with Greek! (If you want to study the dialects in chronological order, Homeric predates Attic by far.)

Yes, Greek is complicated, but I hear that Sanskrit is even more so!

Anyway, good luck with your studies - be sure to check out the Learning Greek boards, and feel free to post any questions you have. (Also be sure to download the SP Ionic font, if you haven't already, so that you can read and type in Greek characters.)
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I'm very glad to find a compatriot here.

Postby polemarchos » Fri Mar 26, 2004 5:38 pm

It seems that your language capability is admirable.
My major is Philosophy. I know the book you mentioned. But, it is said that the author knows very little about ancient languages, he obtains most of his ideas from studies of western scholars. The comparison of Greek and Sanskrit is very common in the comparative studies of religion and philosophy.
Anyway, to learn those languages is very interesting and important for us. Hope you master them successfully. I'm also interested in Sanskrit, but it will cost me too much time. I cannot afford it now. The website below might be helpful to you:
http://ccbs.ntu.edu.tw/DBLM/index.htm
http://acharya.iitm.ac.in/sanskrit/tutor.html
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Postby Jung He Fah Toy » Fri Mar 26, 2004 9:09 pm

Ni Homa Ken!
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Re: Thanks

Postby Barrius » Fri Mar 26, 2004 9:27 pm

Ken_Teng wrote:Boucoup de mercies pour votres reponces :)

In fact, I've learnt German, French, Japanese, Spanish and obtained certain amount of knowledge upon Esperanto, Korean, Latin and Greek. I'm now poring over Sanskrit, a language which probably all Indo-european languages bear relationship to. ... And hence I hope I can get helps here and make as many friends as possible.


Welcome! My brain couldn't hold all that information ;o) I do good just to wake up every day.

Good luck with your studies.
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Postby mingshey » Sat Apr 03, 2004 7:51 am

Welcome! Ni haoma?
Another member who knows Korean! Wonderful! Bangapsupnida! I've took a coulple of course of Chinese, on the other hand. Though I forgot most of it.
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i am a greek

Postby leejonah » Sat Apr 17, 2004 7:07 am

i am happy to see you have interest for greek language. i will be happy to answer to your questions
jonah :P
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Postby Michaelyus » Sat Apr 24, 2004 10:42 pm

Hello there Ken! I am a young teenager living in London, who shares your love of linguistics. I've gathered a fair bit on the evolution of Greek:

Mycenaean Greek
(14th- 12th century BC)
The "original Greek", which used the (now-deciphered) Linear B script.

(12th- 8th century BC)
No documentation (due to the invasion of the Dorians). Greece enters the "Dark Ages". Writing vanishes.

Classical Greek
(8th- 4th century BC)
Three main dialects arise:
Aeolic [north Greece]
Doric [Pelopponesus]
Ionic [Athens]
The Phoenician alphabet is adapted to form the Greek (which still contains letters like digamma, koppa and sampi).
Homer writes his epics in old Ionic.
Herodotus and Hippocrates write in new Ionic.
New Ionic becomes more "cultured" by 500 BC, becoming Attic, "proper" classical Greek.


Koine
(4th century BC- 4th century AD)
Attic absorbs influences from other dialects and changes into Attic-Ionic, which in turn becomes Koine.
Alexander (the Great) conquers Greece and the Middle East, making Koine the Lingua Franca
The "common" man uses Koine.
Attic-Ionic is used in oratory and philosophy.
Rome conquers Greece, Greek loanwords flooding into Latin.
The "New Testament" is written in Koine.

Byzantine Greek
(5th-15th century AD)
Rome is sacked.
Turks invade Greece.
Koine inherits various loanwords.

Modern Greek
(15th century-present)
The main forms of Greek used today are karathevousa and demotic, karathevousa being more literary and formal.
Various loanwords from around the world enter Greek, adapting it to the many new conditions of this century.
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Postby Ken_Teng » Sun Apr 25, 2004 8:34 am

thank u very much
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