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Salvete!

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Salvete!

Postby Lucus Eques » Wed Jan 07, 2004 1:37 pm

Salvete, amici!

I was overjoyed when I discovered this website and its amazing forum. I love languages, but I just started Latin this past semester. Knowing Italian and German, Latin seems a beauteous synthesis of the two in some ways, bearing the Romantic loveliness of Italian, and yet retaining the delightful complexity of grammar as is also possessed by German. And yet it's a completely different tongue, with its own idiosyncrasies and organizations like nothing I had seen before I examined Sanskrit and Finnish.

I believe that I adore languages so much because I love communicating with people; it's such fun to have a conversation with a foreigner, or even a fellow American, in completely different speech. Unfortunately, the only Latin professor at my university is terrible! her pronunciation atrociously bad, with the worst American accent tainting every flatly spoken word; and what's worst, she is horribly unkind and pathetic in her petty attitude, demeaning and antagonizing students who perform poorly. Thank heavens I did well in her dreadful little class! Nevertheless, I feel I didn't learn very much, for we never would ever speak Latin in the class; it was just her demonstration of translations, and our occasional questions; nothing more.

I want to speak Latin, in the way that I can speak German and Italian and French, and to a lesser extent Gaelic and Hindi. Moreover, I would love to see Latin reborn, as an international language beside English and others. But I fear that is only possible if it is spoken outloud; truly, speaking, even singing a foreign language is what is most enjoyable about it, in my opinion.
And so I need practice communicating, to learn the idioms and idiosyncrasies, which is why I sought out such a perfect forum as this. My Latin skills at best are primitive (has anyone ever composed a list of common Latin expressions, by the way?), but I am very willing to learn and am wholly open to suggestions.

And though I love history as well, especially the Classical era, I haven't yet tackled Ancient Greek. To my misfortune, the same Latin teacher at my college also teaches all the Greek courses as well, and I already resolved never, ever to take another class with that horrid woman; I would profit more from just buying the textbook. So, I'll have to teach myself if I want to learn it. Indeed, if I wish to learn any more Latin either, it'll have to be on my own.

In any case, it's a pleasure to be among you all! Valete!
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Postby Keesa » Wed Jan 07, 2004 1:49 pm

Welcome, Lucus!

The Agora is a wonderful place for practicing your Latin (if, of course, you know enough Latin [or Ancient Greek] to post there regularly, which I don't.). The textbooks here are wonderful (the ones I use are, anyway), and there's always someone who can answer your questions. (More often than not, there are several different people, often with several different answers. :wink: )

I also adore languages. I think I love them because I love anything word-related. I like to look at the differences between the languages, and the similarities, and the way the words within a language complement each other.

Anyway, welcome to Textkit. Enjoy!

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Postby Emma_85 » Wed Jan 07, 2004 2:25 pm

Welcome to Textkit!
Wow, your teacher does sound terrible! I can understand Latin not being spoken at all in class, that is normal as it's a dead language and all you normally learn it for is to translate a Latin text into English. But that you got to do was listen to her translations! That's just stupid, how can you learn anything like that?
It seems you would be better off if you just used a textbook and ignored her. There are some free Latin textbooks on this site, which you could use and any questions you have you can ask in the Latin forum.
As for learning to speak it - well, we do have the agora.
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Postby klewlis » Wed Jan 07, 2004 3:04 pm

welcome here!

Where are you from? What are you studying in university?

If you want to practice *listening* to spoken latin, I highly recommend Nuntii Latini (http://www.yleradio1.fi/tiede/nuntii/) which is always fun.
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Postby Episcopus » Wed Jan 07, 2004 4:19 pm

Welcome, your main aim was mine also! I would love to see latin be reborn too.


How do you know, that was how they pronounced latin? It is very good but still tainted with a scandinavian accent :wink:


Put on an accent according to how the words commonly sound. You will know about Sprachgefuhl...it helps.
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Postby mariek » Wed Jan 07, 2004 4:34 pm

Hi Lucus! Welcome to Textkit!
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Postby Lucus Eques » Wed Jan 07, 2004 4:34 pm

Welcome, Lucus!


Thank you, Keesa! Yes, I noticed how wonderfully literate they all are at the Agora; very intimidating. Still, I hope one day to be among them.
As for the text books, Google has more than once linked me to Textkit's fantastic PDFs when searching for tragedies. I already own Weelocks Latin; it seems you have some others on file as well.

I also adore languages. I think I love them because I love anything word-related. I like to look at the differences between the languages, and the similarities, and the way the words within a language complement each other.


Me too! It's amazing seeing a lot of wierdly related words from languages that shouldn't be related. In Ancient Egyptian, for instance (though we have no idea what is sounded like), the word for "cat" is miew. And many words in Hebrew have a lot of familiarity to them; I guess we can blame that on the Phoenicians, and the Bible.

Welcome to Textkit!


Thank you, Emma!

But that you got to do was listen to her translations! That's just stupid, how can you learn anything like that?


Very poorly.

It seems you would be better off if you just used a textbook and ignored her.


Done and done!

There are some free Latin textbooks on this site, which you could use and any questions you have you can ask in the Latin forum.


It's all so amazing! This is what the internet should be.

welcome here!


Thanks, klewlis!

Where are you from? What are you studying in university?


I'm from Pennsylvania, at Lehigh University, and it looks like I'll be studying multiple foreign languages (though for a while it seemed as if I would pursue Astrophysics), for a career perhaps in international politics or business or diplomacy. I also love singing and performing on stage, writing poetry, plays, novellas, and at heart I am wholly dedicated to the principles of chivalry (hence the Eques association to a knight).

If you want to practice *listening* to spoken latin, I highly recommend Nuntii Latini


Wow, this seems pretty amazing! I see that it's out of Finland too; I better get to memorzing the sixteen or so cases of Finnish then.

Welcome,


Thank you! (I should know how to say "thank you" in Latin...)

your main aim was mine also! I would love to see latin be reborn too.


Wouldn't that be fantastic? As the connotations of Roman Catholicism are slowly parting from the language, it may eventually be possible to institute it. It might work especially wel for the European Union, which does everything it can to avoid favoritism to any one country; using a dead language might just be the trick!

How do you know, that was how they pronounced latin? It is very good but still tainted with a scandinavian accent

Put on an accent according to how the words commonly sound. You will know about Sprachgefuhl...it helps.


I'll have to listen.

Hi Lucus! Welcome to Textkit!


Tibi gratia, Mariek! (Just a first attempt... what is it really?)
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Postby Episcopus » Wed Jan 07, 2004 4:58 pm

It's usually the common "gratias tibi ago" (I drive/do thanks to you).
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Postby Keesa » Wed Jan 07, 2004 6:02 pm

Lucus Eques wrote:

Thank you, Keesa! Yes, I noticed how wonderfully literate they all are at the Agora; very intimidating. Still, I hope one day to be among them.


Isn't it, though? I hope to be among them also, but my rate of learning is a slow and steady one. I would have to say, "Still, I hope one year to be among them." :D

Lucus Eques wrote:

I'm from Pennsylvania, at Lehigh University, and it looks like I'll be studying multiple foreign languages (though for a while it seemed as if I would pursue Astrophysics), for a career perhaps in international politics or business or diplomacy. I also love singing and performing on stage, writing poetry, plays, novellas, and at heart I am wholly dedicated to the principles of chivalry (hence the Eques association to a knight).



Astrophysics is cool; I'm crazy about physics myself, especially quantum mechanics (and I find the superstring theory fascinating!), which is odd, since I have only a slight interest in the sciences, and I'm rotten at any kind of higher mathematics. But words are my first love. (I'm actually a writer, and as of September 2003, I'm also a published writer. :D )

I love singing, too, and my sister and I sing in churches sometimes. (Strictly amateur, though-no professional work.) I've never done any acting, though, with the exception of Christmas pageants. (I got to be the angel, once, announcing Christ's birth to the shepherds. My sister seemed to find the thought of me playing an angel hilarious. :wink: )

I love reading about King Arthur, Ivanhoe, and the Song of Roland (someday I'm going to read that in French!), but my knowledge of the laws of chivalry is sadly limited. :( Someday I'll have to remedy that...
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Postby benissimus » Thu Jan 08, 2004 12:39 am

That was a really great introduction. It sounds like you got stuck with the same professor my friend did :roll:

If you want to speak Latin you can always message me on AIM or something (I have just about every messenger known to exist), and this applies to anyone else too! The Agora is a great place but I find it difficult to think of anything about which to write, since the very nature of a forum is geared towards lengthier posts and not towards conversation.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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Postby Lucus Eques » Thu Jan 08, 2004 1:21 am

Ah, gratias tibi ago, Episcopus. What about "your welcome"? Or even "how does one say..."? Quam dicit...?

Astrophysics is cool; I'm crazy about physics myself, especially quantum mechanics (and I find the superstring theory fascinating!),


Ah, String Theory... I loved it too at first; being musical as well, perhaps you found the stringed instrument analogy lovely and symphonic, as I. However, I truly have come to believe that most physicists don't have any idea what they're talking about, most especially Stephen Hawking, whom I once dilixi, until he said that, when multiple, totally unrelated equations are all possible answers, he, just as other physicists, choose what they find most "aesthetically pleasing" as the determiner. It was like he just threw science out the window, delighted that with all his estimation no one might ever doubt him. I also think his black hole radiation is a crock. But hey, he sure inspired some memorable Star Trek: Voyager episodes.

I won't waste anyone elses time here on these astrophysical matters, but I elaborate on my opinions in full here:

http://www.newmars.com/cgi-bin/ikonboar ... t=65;st=15

There I go under the alias "Spider-Man." Scroll down to read the transcript of the "Rethinking Relativity" essay I cite verbatim.

which is odd, since I have only a slight interest in the sciences, and I'm rotten at any kind of higher mathematics. But words are my first love. (I'm actually a writer, and as of September 2003, I'm also a published writer. )


Ironically, it's the opposite for me; nature and science were my first loves. But ultimately, I believe linguistics will be most enjoyable, as being a physicist seems such a boring, isolated life, and I love people far too much.

I love singing, too, and my sister and I sing in churches sometimes. (Strictly amateur, though-no professional work.) I've never done any acting, though, with the exception of Christmas pageants. (I got to be the angel, once, announcing Christ's birth to the shepherds. My sister seemed to find the thought of me playing an angel hilarious. )


Hehe, well I'm sure you are an angel; you're certainly as friendly and polite, just like so many of you all.

I love reading about King Arthur, Ivanhoe, and the Song of Roland (someday I'm going to read that in French!), but my knowledge of the laws of chivalry is sadly limited. Someday I'll have to remedy that...


Ooh, those are all wonderful. As for Chivalry, I have a few essays I've written; perhaps I can procure the text for you some time.


That was a really great introduction.


Gratias tibi ago, Benissimus!

If you want to speak Latin you can always message me on AIM or something (I have just about every messenger known to exist),


Multas gratias; I may have to take you up on that.

and this applies to anyone else too! The Agora is a great place but I find it difficult to think of anything about which to write, since the very nature of a forum is geared towards lengthier posts and not towards conversation.


Still, very fascinating it all is. Would anyone know of a website that lists Latin conversational expressions, like "how are you doing?", "what time is it?", "my name is...", et cetera?
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Postby benissimus » Thu Jan 08, 2004 2:23 am

Still, very fascinating it all is. Would anyone know of a website that lists Latin conversational expressions, like "how are you doing?", "what time is it?", "my name is...", et cetera?


I have such a book... it is called "Latin Can Be Fun" by George Capellanus, but I am sure there is some site on the internet. It may be hard to find though, since the key words will most likely turn up Latin phrases and expressions we use in English (like this one: http://oaks.nvg.org/ys2ra11.html#a ) instead of simple things like "my name is..." which would be "meum nomen est" or, more commonly, "nomen mihi est" (these phrases are very nice because you can just slip your name in as a nominative). You can, of course, just ask in the Latin forum ;)
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Postby klewlis » Thu Jan 08, 2004 3:46 am

there's also the daily email from um.... hm, what's it called? someone help me here. Anyway, this woman sends out an email nearly every day with some conversational phrase in latin.
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Postby ingrid70 » Thu Jan 08, 2004 6:54 pm

klewlis wrote:there's also the daily email from um.... hm, what's it called? someone help me here. Anyway, this woman sends out an email nearly every day with some conversational phrase in latin.


that's http://mail.minnehahaacademy.net/Lists/latin-phrase/

There's also a book by John Traupman, Conversational Latin for Oral Proficiency, you can get it via Amazon (use the link on the textkit site :).

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Postby klewlis » Thu Jan 08, 2004 7:47 pm

that's the one! thanks for making up for my ineptitude ;)
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Postby Lucus Eques » Fri Jan 09, 2004 2:11 am

Wow, gratias tibi ago, Ingrid, and to you, Klewlis, for thinking of it.
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