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New One: Pls Check.....

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New One: Pls Check.....

Postby awlright » Wed Feb 25, 2009 9:37 pm

Could you check this second part pls:

deinde Alexander ducibus Graecorum convocatis nautavit se in Asiam exercitum magnum
ducturum esse ut Dario e regno expulso locum eius ipse teneret. 'Achilles olim' inquit 'e gente
mea miles fortissimus, in Asia gloriam bello accepit:cuius exemplo ego in Asiam profectus hos
barbaros puniam qui, tribus incursionibus in Graecam factis, maioribus nostris iniurias
gravissimas fecerunt. ' quae cum dixisset, Graeci magno clamore sublato Alexandrum
laudaverunt et se copias ei daturos esse promiserunt

Then, with the leaders having been called together Alexander announced he would lead his army
into Asia so that he could drive out Darius from the kingdom having held the place himself. He
said "Some time ago Achilles, the most brave out of my band of soldiers, received glory from the
war in Asia: by example i set out to punish these who, having made three invasions in Greece,
inflicted serious injuries to our ancestors." When he had said these things, they praised
Alexander raising a great shout and promised they would give troops to him.
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Re: New One: Pls Check.....

Postby Rhodopeius » Thu Feb 26, 2009 5:04 am

awlright wrote:Could you check this second part pls:

Then, with the leaders having been called together Alexander announced he would lead his army
into Asia so that he could drive out Darius from the kingdom having held the place himself.


You are right to take this as a purpose clause introduced by ut. However, Dario e regno expulso is an ablative absolute. Teneret is the verb of the ut clause. Alexander is the subject of the ut clause.

"...so that, Darius being expelled from the kingdom, he (Alexander) himself would possess his place."
awlright wrote:He
said "Some time ago Achilles, the most brave out of my band of soldiers, received glory from the
war in Asia:


Gens, gentis f. usually means a clan, stock, people, tribe, or nation. And you have miles fortissimus in apposition to Achilles. So:

"Achilles, the bravest soldier of my people..."

awlright wrote: by example i set out to punish these who, having made three invasions in Greece,


Profectus is a past participle. Puniam is the verb of the clause. Hos barbaros=these barbarians, the direct object of puniam.

"By his example, having set out for Asia, I will punish these barbarians who..."
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Re: New One: Pls Check.....

Postby Imber Ranae » Thu Feb 26, 2009 5:15 am

Pretty good. You left out few words by accident, such as Graecorum and magnum in the first sentence, and I suppose "nautavit" is a typo for nuntiavit. That first purpose clause is a little messy: Dario e regno expulso is an ablative absolute, showing what he means to do first, i.e. "so that after/by driving Darius out from the kingdom he might take possession of his [Darius'] territory". Also, e gente mea miles fortissimus means "the bravest soldier from my tribe"; miles is singular, in apposition to Achilles. Cuius exemplo should be "and by his [Achilles'] example." Don't leave out barbaros, and puniam is the main verb, which is future, while profectus is a perfect active (i.e. deponent) participle in agreement with ego. And finally, at the end you left out Graeci again.
Ex mala malo
bono malo uesci
quam ex bona malo
malo malo malo.
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