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Locative

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Locative

Postby Jbbrown » Sun Feb 22, 2009 2:10 am

I am a student who is studying Lingua Latina chapter six. Is the locative case used when "in" is asumed? Or is it used in some other place?
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Re: Locative

Postby Rhodopeius » Sun Feb 22, 2009 3:23 am

The locative is an archaic case that seems to have fallen out of use before classical times. It is still used in classical Latin, however, with a few words. Domus, -us, is one example.

Domi sum, I am at home.

The form here is the same as that of the genitive singular of a second declension noun. To express motion toward, you would use this form:

Eo domum. I go home.

This one looks like the accusative singular of a second or fourth declension noun, with no preposition as you would use with other words that don't take the locative.

Eo ad montem. I go to the mountain.

And to express motion away from, you would use this form:

Abeo domo. I go away from home.

This one looks like the ablative singular of a second declension noun. Once again, no preposition.

Discedo a taberna. I part from the hut.

There are only a few common words that take the locative, but it is commonly used with the names of cities and towns, like Roma, -ae itself.

Romam veni. I came to Rome.

And so forth. You get used to to it after a little while. The only really strange thing about it is that the locative of place where resembles a genitive, which is a little confusing.

Just remember that when you're taunting Roman oppressors, the proper phrasing is "Romani, ite domum!"
Scott Sumrall. http://classicsexercises.blogspot.com

"Qui sis, non unde natus sis reputa."
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Re: Locative

Postby paulusnb » Sun Feb 22, 2009 5:19 am

Rhodopeius wrote:Just remember that when you're taunting Roman oppressors, the proper phrasing is "Romani, ite domum!"


I show this movie to my students. :D I love it. Also, "What have the Romans ever done for us?"
When a true genius appears, you can know him by this sign: that all the dunces are in a confederacy against him. ~Swift
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Re: Locative

Postby Rhodopeius » Sun Feb 22, 2009 8:43 pm

I recently found out that John Cleese, the comedy legend who played the centurion in that scene, was a Latin teacher as a young man. Apparently, that scene is not far from the real methods used by pedagogues in the 1940's and 50's.
Scott Sumrall. http://classicsexercises.blogspot.com

"Qui sis, non unde natus sis reputa."
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Re: Locative

Postby Iulia » Tue Feb 24, 2009 9:07 pm

Technically, the Locative case is used only to describe the Place Where a person or event is. (Motion Towards or Motion From are different constructions.) The Locative is used in just a few cases --with the names of cities, towns, small islands, and the two nouns, domus (as described above) and rus.

For names that are 1st or 2nd declension singular (such as Roma, -ae f. or Corinthus -i m.), the Locative is the same form as the Genitive. Thus, at/in Rome is "Romae" and at/in Corinth is "Corinthi." For plural nouns of the 1st and 2nd Declensions and nouns of all other declensions (such as Pompeii -orum m.pl. and Carthago -inis f.), the Locative is the same as the Ablative. Thus, at/in Pompeii is "Pompeiis" and at/in Carthage is "Carthagine" (or sometimes with the old spelling "Carthagini").

Spero vos videre Romae! /Iulia
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Re: Locative

Postby Imber Ranae » Wed Feb 25, 2009 12:47 am

A few others take the locative. The second declension feminine noun humus "earth/ground/soil" has a locative humi "on the ground". The word militia in the phrase domi militiaeque "at home and abroad (i.e. in military service)" is also locative, but the form only exists in that ossified phrase.
Ex mala malo
bono malo uesci
quam ex bona malo
malo malo malo.
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