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Which curriculum?

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Which curriculum?

Postby JeanneA » Thu Feb 05, 2009 7:36 pm

I have a high school freshman that can't take Latin in school because of time limitations in her schedule.
She very much wants to learn Latin and has asked me if she can do it at home instead.
She is intellegent and motivated with her school work and with home studies.
She has done the first 4 books of Vocabulary from Classical Roots and has had Spanish since she was in kindergarten.
Can Latin be learned well independently? If so, what are the pro's and con's of the most common curriculums.
I was considering Wheelock's or Artes Latinae but would consider another curriculum if there are better suggestions.

Thank you for your assistance.
Jeanne
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Re: Which curriculum?

Postby Superavi » Thu Feb 05, 2009 8:19 pm

I am learning out of the Oxford Latin Course, but it is not self study. I like the course a lot, but I can't imagine how it would be without the additional instruction by my professor. Have you looked into taking it at a college rather than at her high school? It is possible that you could find a school nearby that offers the course at a better time than her high school. I feel I get so much more out of my studies by having my professor present to fill in any blanks left by the textbooks.

Whatever you choose, good luck!
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Re: Which curriculum?

Postby Rhodopeius » Fri Feb 06, 2009 2:05 am

My first textbook was Wheelock's. I began using it a year or so after high school (I haven't been attending college but I study quite a bit) and I loved it. I tend to be a lazy student, by myself or in formal classes, and I went through it pretty fast.

Spanish was also my second language--I was fluent by the end of high school, and it was a tremendous boon in learning Latin, in which I now consider myself literate. The root connection to Latin is helpful, though the relative complexity of the later is more challenging. For somebody interested in liberal arts or the humanities, an ancient language like Latin is fantastic preparation for expanding one's mind to contemplate other cultures separated from us by time and space.

So I would recommend Wheelock's because that is what I'm familiar with and I found it very stimulating and effective. I have the workbook, which is good for use in tandem or just after completing the textbook, but people seem to have a hard time obtaining the answer key; I'm not sure why.

Best of luck
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Re: Which curriculum?

Postby Lex » Fri Feb 06, 2009 2:28 am

Rhodopeius wrote:... but people seem to have a hard time obtaining the answer key; I'm not sure why.


Benissimus, a Textkit member, has written a key file in PDF format that is available for download here (http://www.textkit.com/learn/ID/162/author_id/76/). Another Textkit member linked to his site (http://sites.google.com/site/spezadams/), which contains keys (I can't vouch for their accuracy, but they look official). Chapter 32 shows up blank, but...
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Re: Which curriculum?

Postby paulusnb » Fri Feb 06, 2009 2:59 am

Here is a link to a home school website that gives reviews of different curricula. http://www.homeschoolchristian.com/curr ... arison.php

First, you are setting her up for failure if you do a self-study Wheelock. This book was written for college students in the 50's. If you are just awestruck by Wheelock because too many intelligent people suggest it (my own professor was adamant I use it in my classroom) then go with Our Latin Heritage. It is the same grammar/inflection intense approach, but was designed for High Schools. It has more exercises and is paced better. I think it is Out of Print, but a copy can be found I am sure. I have taught out of it, and it has its merits. Many of the High Schools in this area used Our Latin Heritage until it went out of print.

People here will suggest Lingua Latina http://www.amazon.com/Lingua-Latina-Fam ... 651&sr=8-1. At 17 $, what do you have to lose? I would not rely solely on this book, however, for it is largely inductive WITH NO ENGLISH WHATSOEVER. You will need another program, whether it be Ecce Romani, Henle, Wheelocks, Cambridge, Oxford, etc. I was taught out of Oxford and teach out of Ecce Romani. I think the inductive route is the way to go (Ecce, Oxford, Lingua Latina).

Another suggestion is to get a Latin tutor. Have your daughter meet with the tutor once a week ( or whatever) and let them set up a reading program. This would basically be like a college course. There may be a retired Latin teacher in the area who takes on tutoring like this.

PS. Here is a site where the people make a suggestion which completely contradicts mine. Here is their reason http://classicalschool.blogspot.com/200 ... culum.html They call Wheelock's a sight for sore eyes. They need to watch more TV.
Last edited by paulusnb on Fri Feb 06, 2009 3:29 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Which curriculum?

Postby JeanneA » Fri Feb 06, 2009 3:23 am

Thanks to those who have already responded.
I have looked at the website suggested for comparison of Latin curriculums. It is still hard to choose when I personally have no basis of reference.
Thank you for the links for the Wheelock answer keys. I have saved them in the event that that is what we use.
I know that if my daughter stays in the school she is in throughout high school, she will never be able to fit Latin in her schedule. If I were to move her to the private school, they use Ecce Romani. I may talk to the Latin teacher at school and see about tutoring as suggested.
The other option I am considering is keystonehighschool.com They use Wheelock but at least she would have some direction.
On a side note... the comment about needing to watch more TV is amusing. We haven't had television in our home for several years and we will not have it anytime in the near future. I have to admit I have been a little shocked at the number of assignments that high school students get that are based on something from television. SAD!
Thanks for your suggestions and comments.
Jeanne
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Re: Which curriculum?

Postby paulusnb » Fri Feb 06, 2009 7:49 pm

I looked at keystone. This might be a better option than a tutor. Does the student interact live with the teacher or is it a recording?

And wait, you have high speed internet connections with microphones and speakers but no tv? I see. Virtue has its limits. :D JK, as the kids are saying these days. (When I first heard this, I thought the kids were swearing by JK Rowling :? )
When a true genius appears, you can know him by this sign: that all the dunces are in a confederacy against him. ~Swift
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Re: Which curriculum?

Postby cantator » Sat Feb 07, 2009 11:28 am

JeanneA wrote: I may talk to the Latin teacher at school and see about tutoring as suggested.


My experience with Latin: I took a year in junior high school (aka middle school), promptly forgot anything I learned (which was very little, thanks to my first girlfriend sitting right behind me), and didn't think about it again until I was in my early 20s. I taught my self some rudiments, but at some point I realized the need for a tutor. I studied privately with Dr Richard Hebein for a couple of years, then he sent me on my way with some basic skills and a reading list. I've been expanding the skills and plowing through that list for almost 40 years now. >)

On a side note... the comment about needing to watch more TV is amusing. We haven't had television in our home for several years and we will not have it anytime in the near future. I have to admit I have been a little shocked at the number of assignments that high school students get that are based on something from television. SAD!


Bless your head, another TV-less soul ! I haven't owned one for the better part of the past forty years, thanks to a book called Four Arguments For The Elimination Of Television. It's a personal choice, of course, but getting rid of the tube was one of the best decisions I ever made. Thankfully, very few of my private students (I'm a music instructor) have time to waste on it, and the computer is their communications technology of choice anyway.
Similis sum folio de quo ludunt venti.
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Re: Which curriculum?

Postby paulusnb » Sat Feb 07, 2009 4:42 pm

So, Cantator and Jeanne, can I assume that you all missed the revelation on Lost[i] last week that Latin was the official language of "the others"? (an episode that is available online. Wait, then you do have a tv :D )
When a true genius appears, you can know him by this sign: that all the dunces are in a confederacy against him. ~Swift
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Re: Which curriculum?

Postby Essorant » Sat Feb 07, 2009 4:50 pm

I think good books such as Wheelock's Latin and Latin Via Ovid are even better teachers as books than most teachers are as teachers. As long as lust to learn and some patience are there, the independant study shall be superior. For the student may go at his own pace, repeat and delay anything he needs whenever he needs, not feel embarassed or pressured under the eyes of another, nor give up because he didn't meet some academic stipulation.
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Re: Which curriculum?

Postby JeanneA » Sat Feb 07, 2009 5:08 pm

Paul,
No I have to say that I didn't see Lost this week.... I have never watched that show even online.
I haven't seen any television program for over 3 years. Not Dancing with the Stars, American Idol etc. and I was spared being bombarded with negative political ads prior to the election.
The only program that I download to watch is Numb3rs. My true love is math and I think it is an interesting program about how math is used in everyday lives. I know it is often far fetched, it would take a huge team of mathematicians to come up with some of those things but still interesting.
My daughter, is a math/science mind as well and I have used this program to impress on her that contrary to the common thought that girls can't do math and science as well as boys, they can.
She is now interested in Latin as well. That is why I am now looking for a curriculum for her. No television means more time to study, read, enjoy music etc. and now learn Latin hopefully.

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