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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Thu Feb 05, 2009 9:18 pm

Number 34. Numerus triginta quattuor.
Snakes and Ladders is the name of a board game that was invented in India. It reflects the idea that the journey through life is full of ups (ladders) and downs (snakes). It also reflects the idea of reincarnation, that life and death are linked in an eternal cycle.

Two or more players play on a square board and take turns to throw a die. Each moves a counter forward the number of spaces shown on the die. If they land at the foot of a ladder they ascend the ladder, and if they land on the head of a snake they descend the snake. The winner is the first to reach the furthest square. This version of the game is for one player.


Serpentes Scalaeque est nomen ludi tabulae qui in Indiâ fictus est. Quod iter per vitam et bonas et malas partes habet propter serpentes scalasque in ludo reverberat. Insinuatur etiam propositio reincarnationis, quod vita atque mors in circuitu perpetuo conjunctae sunt.

Duo lusores vel plus in tabulâ quadrâ ludunt et alternis vicibus aleam jactant. Omnis calculum suum secundùm numerum spatiorum in aleâ indicatum procedere facit. Si aliquis ad imum scalarum pervenit, per scalas ascendit; si ad caput serpentis, per serpentem descendit. Victor qui ultimum spatium attingit. Hac versio ludi singuli lusori est.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Fri Feb 06, 2009 1:43 am

Number 35. Numerus triginta quinque.
In the Middle Ages, the seven liberal arts included the Trivium (grammar, rhetoric and logic) and the Quadrivium (arithmetic, astronomy, geometry, music).

Those wanting careers in administration devoted themselves to the study of the Trivium in the University's Faculty of Liberal Arts. After studying the Trivium, those bound for the Church entered the Faculty of Theology, those for law the Faculty of Jurisprudence. The Quadrivium was for those wishing to go into music, the exercise of arms, architecture and medecine, the last of whom were obliged to then go into the Faculty of Medicine in order to graduate as medical doctors.


Medio Aevo, in septem artibus liberalibus includebantur Trivium (artes grammaticae, rhetoricae, dialecticae) et Quadrivium (artes arithmeticae, astronomicae, geometricae, musicae).

Qui vitam in moderamine volebant in Facultate Artium Liberalium Universitatis studio Trivi se impendebant. Post studium Trivi, qui ad ecclesiam aspirabant in Facultatem Theologiae intrabant, qui ad legem in Facultatem Jurisprudentiae. Erat Quadrivium illis ad musicam vel exercitationem armorum vel architecturam vel medicinam aspirantibus, quorum postremi posteà in Facultatem Medicinae ire debebant ut gradus medici suscipiatur.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Fri Feb 06, 2009 3:03 pm

Number 36. Numerus triginta sex.
Hunting is a traditional sport to seek out, and capture or kill, wild animals in the countryside. Often a pack of dogs was used to trace the scent of an animal, with hunters following on horseback. A hunter on foot might follow an animal's tracks. He might use a bow and arrow or a gun to kill his prey. Often the animal is skinned with a knife for its pelt and for food. Nowadays, there are many who believe in animal rights and want a world-wide ban on hunting; there are, however, also many who do not.


Venatio est ludus ex veteri famâ, quô ferae per rus indaguntur et capiuntur aut interficiuntur. Saepè canum venaticorum turba ad odorem animalis sequendum adhibeatur, dum venatores cum equo sequuntur. Venator pedibus vestigia ferae sequatur. Is arco sagittâque vel scloppo utatur ut praedam interficiat. Cultro saepè pelle animans exui, ut pellis et caro habentur. Diebus nostris, sunt multes qui in juribus animalium credunt et interdictionem per omnes terras contrà venandum volunt; multes autem quoquè qui id nolunt.
Last edited by adrianus on Sun Feb 08, 2009 1:48 am, edited 2 times in total.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Fri Feb 06, 2009 8:24 pm

Number 37. Numerus triginta septem.
Use a ruler to measure the length, breadth or height of any object, in feet or meters. Use a scales to measure its weight, in pounds or kilogrammes. Measure temperature, in degrees Celsius or Fahrenheit, with a thermometer. Use a clock to measure the passage of time in seconds, minutes and hours. A speedometer will tell you the speed of your vehicle in miles or kilometers per hour. A global positioning system will measure your position on the Earth in degrees latitude and longitude and in height above sea-level.


Utere regulâ ad longitudinem vel latitudinem vel altitudinem calculandam cuiusque rei objectae, pedibus vel metris. Utere librâ ut pondus illius rei libris vel chilogrammatibus scitur. Thermometro caloris gradum metire, gradibus Celsianis vel Fahreinheit. Horologium adhibe ut progressum temporis secundis, minutis, horis metiaris. Tachometrum milliaribus vel kilometris per horam celeritatem vehiculi indicat. Instrumentum systematis universi positioni situm tuum in terrâ gradibus latitudinis longitudinisque et altitudine suprà aequorem maris metietur.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Fri Feb 13, 2009 5:19 pm

Number 38. Numerus triginta octo.
Abbreviations

An abbreviation is a single letter or short sequence of letters which in itself is not a word but which represents either a longer word or a group of words. For that reason, we may say that an abbreviation is the sign of a longer word. An acronym resembles an abbreviation. An acronym, however, is composed of the initial letters of a collocation; an abbreviation is more often composed of the initial letter or part of a single word. Generally, an abbreviation is written using small letters, an acronym in capitals. Abbreviations always end in a full stop to indicate missing letters. In the past, full stops were placed after every letter in an acronym; now, they rarely are.


Abbreviationes

Abbreviatio est aut singularis littera aut series litterarum brevis, quae in se verbum non est atqui vel verbum longiorem vel collocationem demonstrat. Ideò, abbreviationem signum verbi longioris esse dicamus. Acronymum simile abbreviationis est. Acronymum autem è litteris collocationis incipientibus fingitur; abbreviatio saepiùs è litterâ vel parte incipienti verbi singularis. Universè, per minusculas litteras abbreviatio scribitur, acronymum per majusculas. Semper abbreviatio per punctum terminatur, quod punctum litteras carere indicat. Anteà, puncti omnes litteras in acronymo sequebantur; nunc non ferè includuntur.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Sun Mar 08, 2009 12:43 pm

Number 39. Numerus undequadraginta.

Bones make up the skeleton. They are white and mostly composed of calcium. A child's bones are relatively soft and still growing. Old people's bones are more brittle and easily broken. When eating, you pick meat off a bone. An animal could choke when eating bones if one stuck in its throat. A mollusc is an animal that has a shell as an eternal skeleton. The following are made from material similar to bone: teeth, tusks, beaks, horns, hooves, claws, and nails. Because bone is hard, it can be carved into valuable and decorative things. Fossils are petrified bones.


Ossibus sceleton componitur. Ossa sunt alba et ferè adusquè calcio facuntur. Ossa infantis mollia pro ratione sunt et continuò nascuntur; illa vetorum fragiliora et facilè infracta. Tu edens, carnem ex osse cultri apice desecas. Suffocet bestia quae ossa edet, si unum illorum in gulâ adhaereat. Os quià durum in res decoras atque charas sculpi potest. Molluscum est animal quod concham ut sceleton externum habet. Ex materiâ similis illâ ossis facti sunt ità: dens, cornu, unguis. Fossila sunt ossa in lapidem conversa.

Please, do you see any mistakes? Videsne errores ullos, quaeso?
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Sun Mar 08, 2009 2:00 pm

Number 40. Numerus quadraginta.

The body has a skeleton, organs, veins and arteries, muscles, fat and skin. The skeleton supports the body. The organs are the brain, heart, lungs, kidney, liver, stomach, and intestines. We think with our brain. The heart pumps blood through the arteries and back through the veins. The blood carries nutrients and food from the stomach and oxygen from the lungs to all the cells of the body. Solid waste is expelled through the intestines, liquid waste through the bladder. Electrical signals from the brain to our muscles are transmitted by the nerves. Muscles then move our bones.


Corpus habet ossa, organa, venas, arterias, musculos, unguen et cutem. Ossa corpus sustinent. Organa sunt cerebrum, cor, pulmo, renunculus, jecur, stomachus, intestinum. Cerebro cogitamus. Cor sanguinem per arteriis exhaurit et per venis remittit. Ad omnes corporis cellulas gerit sanguis de stomacho nutrimenta cibumque atque de pulmone oxygenium. Solida rejectanea per intestino expelluntur, liquida per aquaticâ. Cum nervis transmittuntur signa electrica ex cerebro ad musculis. Dein musculi ossa movent.

Please, do you see mistakes? Videsne errores, quaeso?
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Sun Mar 08, 2009 3:33 pm

Number 41. Numerus quadraginta unus.
There are sixty seconds in a minute, sixty minutes in an hour, twenty four hours in a day.

The day has four parts: morning, afternoon, evening and night. The morning is the time between dawn and noon. Dawn is when the sun first appears above the horizon and casts its light. Noon is when the sun is at its highest point. Night falls when the sun sets. The moon appears at night or in the evening at some times of the year.

Before the invention of the mechanical clock, sundials showed the time during the day before nightfall, and an hourglass was used to measure hours and minutes.


Sunt sexaginta secundae in minutâ, sexaginta minutae in horâ, viginti quattuor horae in die.

Habet dies partes quattuor: mane, postmeridianum, vesperem, noctem. Mane est spatium inter auroram et meridiem. Aurora est ubi sol in circulum finientem primò apparet et lucem eam mittit. Meridies est ubi sol locum itineris eius altissimum in caelo attigit. Cum sol occidit, nox cadit. Apparet luna nocte vel interdùm in anno vespere.

Ante mechanici horologii inventionem, tempus solario per diem ante cadentem noctis sciebatur, et clepsydrâ utebantur ad horas minutasque metiendas.

Please, do you see mistakes? Videsne errores, quaeso?
Last edited by adrianus on Sun Mar 08, 2009 6:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Sun Mar 08, 2009 5:54 pm

Number 42. Numerus quadraginta duo.

There are seven days in a week and twelve months in a year. There are three hundred & sixty five days in all years except leap years. The months of September, April, June & November have thirty days. The rest have thirty one, except February which has twenty eight and a extra day in a leap year (which is called a Leap Day). The Leap Day was introduced in 46BC by Julius Caesar, who also made January the first month of the year. Before then, March was the first month.

Nowadays, "Common Era" and "Before Common Era" are terms often used for "Before Christ" and "Anno Domini" in dates.



Sunt septem dies in hebdomade et duodecima menses in anno. Sunt trecentae sexaginta quinque dies omne in anno absque bisextile. Menses Septembris atque Aprilis ac Junii Novembrisque triginta dies habent. Reliqui triginta unam, absque Februarii mense qui duodetriginta dies habet et bisextile anno additiciam (quae "intercalaris" vocatur). Dies intercalaris à Julio Caesare anno quadringento sexto ante aevum communem introducta est. Qui Caesar mensem Januarii primum mensum esse fecit. Anteà Martii mensis primus erat.

Nunc, appellationibus "Aevo Commune" et "ante Aevum Communem" saepè pro "ante natum Christi" et "Anno Domini" in annis denominandis utuntur.

Please, do you see mistakes? Videsne errores, quaeso?
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Sun Mar 08, 2009 9:41 pm

Number 43. Numerus quadraginta tres.
A wealthy person has a lot of money; a poor person has very little or none. Metal coins and paper or plastic banknotes are types of money that you might have in a pocket, a purse, a wallet or the bank, but many people prefer to use a cheque or credit card.

An employer pays a wage to an employee who earns it by working in a job. A commercial business makes money by buying and selling at a profit. Banks make a profit by lending money to borrowers and charging interest on the loan, and also by investing depositors' money on their own behalf in other ways.

Robbers and burglars steal money and valuable goods.


Homo dives multam pecuniam habet; pauper aut minimam aut nullam. Nummi metallici et schedinummi seu chartacei seu plastici sunt genera pecuniae quae in fundâ vel sacculo vel foliotheculâ vel argentariâ habeas, at multi sunt qui usum tesserae nummariae seu tabellae tributariae praeferunt.

Conductor operis mercedem mercennario pendit, qui mercennarius in quaestu expediendo eum meret. Societas mercatoria emendo vendendoque ad lucrum faciendum pecuniam meret. Argentariae in pecuniâ locandâ cuibus mutuò sumunt et foeno constituendo de versurâ lucrum faciunt; item coquè suâ causâ per alias vias in pecuniâ depositorum collocandâ.

Fures ac effractores pecuniam et bona chara auferunt.

Please, do you see mistakes? Videsne errores, quaeso?
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Wed Mar 11, 2009 3:38 pm

Number 44. Numerus quadraginta quattuor.
The type of hair we have and its colour are inherited from our parents, but we can always temporarily change its appearance. There are many hair-styles, and some are easier to maintain than others. To keep hair looking good and in good condition requires cutting, trimming, combing, washing, drying and styling. When we get older, our hair often becomes grey and thin or we lose it altogether. Some people try to disguise this using hair-dye, wigs and hair-implants, or even by shaving the head.

Men tend to go bald more than women but have more facial and body hair. Unless they want to grow a moustache, beard or sideburns, most men shave everyday. In many countries, women practice shaving their armpits, legs and sometimes pubic hair.

Quod genus et quem colorem comae habemus ab parentibus succedimus, sed nos formam eius temporariè mutare semper possumus. Multae sunt formae,—aliae aliis faciliùs sustentatae. Ut eius formam belli adspectûs habitûsque sustineamus, requirit comam secari tonderi pecti lavari siccari effingi. Nobis senioribus, saepè fiunt capilli vel cani vel tenues aut oppidò perditi. Aliqui tincto capilli capillamentove vel capillis infixis etiam capite deradiendo id celare conantur.

Homo plùs quàm mulier calvus fieri tendit, sed is plus pilos in facie corporeque habet. Nisi mystacem vel barbam vel cirros laterales habere volunt, plerusque hominum omne die se deradunt. Multis in terris, mulieres axillas atque cruria et interdùm pubem sibi deradere solent.

Mistakes? Suntne errata?
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Wed Mar 11, 2009 8:52 pm

Number 45. Numerus quadraginta quinque.
To set the table, first lay the tablecloth. Make sure there is a chair for every guest. Then put down the place-settings before each chair. A basic place-setting is cutlery (a knife, fork, and soup or dessert spoon), dinner plate and side-plate. Put the fork on the left, the knife on the right of the dinner plate and the soup or dessert spoon behind it. Put out glasses for water, fruit juice and other drinks. For breakfast, put out cups and saucers for tea and coffee. In the centre of the table, put the serving plates, condiments and water jugs.

Breakfast is in the morning, lunch is at noon, dinner in the evening and supper before going to bed.

Ut mensam ponas, primò mappam pande. Sellam omni hospiti esse approba. Tunc appone positura ante quamque sellam. Positura simplex in instrumentis escariis (cultro ac furcâ atque cochleare juris bellariive capacio) cum patinâ et patellâ margine consistit. Colloca furcam ad sinistram patinae, cultrum ad dextram et cochlear post. Ad aquam, succos fructorum et alias libationes potandas, appone hyalos. Jentaculo in parando, pocula scutellasque ad theam cafeamque habendam appone. Mediam in mensam pone lances ministrandi, condimenta et hirneolas aquaticas.

Mane est jectaculum, meridie prandium, vespere cena, et cenula ante cubitum eundum.

Mistakes? Suntne errata?
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Fri Mar 13, 2009 2:13 pm

Number 46. Numerus quadraginta sex.
Clothes fashions have changed significantly over time. Clothing materials have also changed over time from natural to synthetic: skins and fur from animals (wool from sheep, leather from cows), hemp and cotton from plants, plastics from oil. There are also big differences in what people wear depending on where they come from, what they need the clothes for, what the weather is like, what they can afford, what age they are in and what their personal taste is like.

Cultures have always influenced each other when they come into contact. Today, with more people travelling widely, there are a lot more influences on style. However, through mass-media advertising, there is also a lot of pressure to conform to certain models.


Per tempus formae vestis mutabantur. Mutabantur quoquè per tempus textus vestitûs ab naturalibus ad syntheticos: pelles pilique animalium (lana ex ove, aluta ê bove), cannabis atque gossypium ê stirpibus, plastica ex oleo. Propter et locum in quo natus sis et usum cui quaedam vestimenta audeas et conditiones tempestatis et rem quae tibi suppetit et aetatem in quâ vivas et genium proprium tuum, quod vestitur longè aliud est.

Semper humanitates oppetendo in commune plurimùm inter se valent. Nobis diebus, tantis itinera latè facientis, quàm plurimùm afficiuntur formae vestis. Venditatione autem per instrumenta communicationis socialis, magna eâdem est potentia quae nos quasdam formas adsumere impellit.

Mistakes? Errata?
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Fri Mar 13, 2009 7:27 pm

Number 47. Numerus quadraginta septem.
The human body is more than three-quarters liquid. Water is the thing that the body needs most,—at least four pints a day to replace water lost in sweat and urine.

In the shop, you can buy bottles of water (fizzy or still), cartons of milk (skimmed, semi-skimmed or full-fat), fruit juice, cans of fizzy drinks, packets of tea and jars of coffee (either soluble or ground). Apart from these non-alcoholic drinks are alcoholic drinks such as beer and wine (red, white, rosé or fortified) and spirits (whisky, brandy and liqueurs).

Drinks can be taken hot or cold, with or without sugar, or lemon or ice or other flavourings.


Plus quàm tres corporis humanae partes liquidae sunt. Aqua est id quod corpus maxumè requirit,—quattuor sextarios per diem ad aquam sudatam ac in urinâ perditam supplendam.

In tabernâ, tu ampullas aquae (aut effervescentis aut quietae), capsulas lactis (seu despumati seu semidespumati seu plenè opimi), succus fructûs, fascicula thecae et seriolas caffei (aut solubilis aut moliti) emere potes. Hae libationes non alcoholicae separatim, sunt potus alcoholici ut cervisia, ut vinum (rubrum, album, roseum, munitum), ut spiritus ardentes (aqua vitae, vinum sublimatum, liquores aromatici).

Aut calidus aut frigidus bibatur potus; itèm cum aut sinè saccharo citro glacie aut aliis additis saporis.

Mistakes? Vitia?
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Fri Mar 13, 2009 11:39 pm

Number 48. Numerus quadraginta octo (duodequinquaginta).
The solar system is the sun and its satellites,—that is, the collection of planets and other bodies (asteroids and comets) that each travel around the sun within their own elliptic paths (except for the planets' own satellites). Most of these satellites travel in roughly the same plane.

The Earth is the third planet of the solar system. It exists alongside seven others, namely (in order of distance from the sun): Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. The majority of asteroids travel round the sun in orbits between those of Mars and Jupiter. Only the first seven planets in this list were known before the nineteenth century. Then, in 1846, Neptune was discovered. Subsequently, in the twentieth century, several large masses,—one of them being Pluto,—were discovered orbiting beyond Neptune, and in 2006 these were classified as dwarf planets.

Systema solare est sol cum satellitibus eis,—id est, cum collectione planetarum et aliorum corporum (ut asteroides ut cometae), qui omnes satellites in cursibus suis ellipticis circùm solem ambulant, separatim satellites planetarum ipsorum. Plerique satellites circiter in eodem plano ambeunt.

Terra est tertius solaris systematis planeta. Unâ cum septem caeteris exstat, videlicet itá (in ordine distantiarum ab sole): Mercurio, Venere, Martio, Jove, Saturno, Urano, Neptuno. Magna asteroidum pars in orbitis inter illas Martis et Jovis solem circumambulant. Ante undevicesimum saeculum, solùm septem primae planetarum hâc in tabulâ notabantur. Tunc, anno millesimo octingentesimo quadragesimo quarto, Neptunus inventus est. Dein, vicesimo saeculo, inventa sunt nonnulla corpora magna ultrâ Neptuno circumnavigantia, cuius in numero fuit Pluto; quae, anno bis millesimo sexto, pumilae planetae deputata sunt.

Mistakes? Peccata?
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Sat Mar 14, 2009 3:18 pm

Number 49. Numerus quadraginta novem (undequinquaginta).
Symbols are used on maps to indicate features of interest. On this map, it would seem that the town is a prosperous one and a popular place for tourists. It is very accessible by land, sea and air, and it has many industries and visitor attractions. These and other features suggest that the town is as important today as it was in the past.

This map does not have a scale in miles or kilometers. Having looked at the map, however, we might say that the scale is one to ten thousand.

Symboli in chartis adhibeantur ut loci quae intersunt (vel attractivi) insigniantur. Hâc in chartâ, oppidum florentem atque â peregrinatoribus celebratum esse videtur. Et ad terram atque mare aeremque facilè patet, et multas industrias ac amoenitates periegeticas habet. Hae res, unâ cum aliis adjunctis, in medium proferunt oppidum tam grave hodie esse quàm anteà fuisse.

Haec charta scalam milliarium vel chilometrorum caret. Chartâ visâ autem, scalam unae portionis pro decem millia esse dicamus.

Mistakes? Soloecismi?
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Sat Mar 14, 2009 6:30 pm

Number 50. Numerus quinquaginta.
For safety reasons, travellers on roads must obey the highway code. It regulates where traffic may go and how fast, what side of the road to drive upon, where one may stop, wait, turn, reverse or park. To qualify to drive a vehicle, every candidate is individually tested. Part of the test involves correctly identifying road signs.

Securitatis pro ratione, oportet viatores in viis codicem pervii parere. Ordinat codex in quae loca ac quâ velocitate licet commeatum ire, secundum quod latus viae licet vehas, et ubi licet sistere, manere, circumagere, retrocedere, statuere. Ut is capax vehiculum gubernandi dignetur, necesse est singulus canditatus periculum patiatur. In periculo partim involvitur ut signa vehicularia rectè nominantur.

Problems? Problemata?
Corrigendum: "singuli candidati periculum patiantur" [gratiam, ingrid70, tibi habeo]
Last edited by adrianus on Mon Mar 16, 2009 6:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Sat Mar 14, 2009 7:39 pm

Number 51. Numerus quinquaginta unus.
The earth is a planet orbiting the sun and orbited by the moon. It has land, seas and an atmosphere. The earth is round and rotates once every twenty-four hours on an axis that running through the poles (north and south). The axis tilts at an angle of 67 degrees to the earth's plane of orbit around the sun.

Equidistant from the poles is the Equator, an imaginary line around the middle of the earth. To show position on its surface, the earth has an grid with lines of longitude running from pole to pole through the equator, and circular lines of latitude running parallel to the equator.

Terra est planeta qui solem circumit et luno circumitur. Habet regiones et mares atque aerem. Terra est rotunda et semel in viginti unâ horis in axem (qui per polos septentrionalem et australem currit) circumrotat. Angulo sexaginta septem graduum â plano orbiti circùm solem, axis declinat.

Aequidistans â polis est circulus aequinoctialis, linea imaginaria qui circùm mediam terram currit. Ut locum in superficie terrae sciatur, cancellatio suprà terram imponitur, quae ex lineis longitudinis (de polo ad polum per circulum aequinoctialem tendentibus) atque lineis latitudinis circularibus (et aequidistantibus ad circulum aequinoctialem) constat.

Mistakes? Delicta?

Corrigenda: "lunâ" pro "luno"; "semel in viginti quattuor horis" [gratias, ingrid70]
Last edited by adrianus on Mon Mar 16, 2009 6:17 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Sun Mar 15, 2009 1:35 am

Number 52. Numerus quinquaginta duo.
Signs are graphical shapes or symbols or actions or sounds which have a certain meaning. Letters, symbols and pictograms (similar to the hieroglyphics of the ancients) may be seen on a computer keyboard; many other signs are included in the fonts to be found on a computer. An accent, or diacritic, is a sign which, in Latin, is written above a letter (also below, in certain other languages). There are three Latin accents, namely those belonging also to the Greeks: the acute, grave and circumflex, placed over the vowels, and affecting sound and emphasis each in its own way. Often in dictionaries, these three extra signs are found: the macron, caron and dieresis. The macron indicates a long vowel and the caron a short one; while the dieresis divides adjoining vowels, that might otherwise be considered a diphthong, into separate syllables.

Signa sunt figurae graphicae seu symboli aut actiones aut sonitus qui quandam significationem habent. Litterae atque symboli ac pictogrammata (hieroglyphicis antiquitorum similia) in malleorum serie computatrale videantur; multa alia signa in scripturis quae in computatro invenientur includuntur. Accentus seu signum diacriticum est signum quod latinè super litteram scribitur (sub etiam, in quibusdam aliis linguis). Accentus latini sunt tres, videlicet illi quoquè Graecorum: acutus, gravis, circumflexus, qui super vocales ponuntur et singuli sonum emphasinque movent. Saepè in dictionariis, haec tres signa addititia videantur: macron, micron, diaeresis. Macron vocalem longam indicat; micron brevem. Dividit diaeresis in duas syllabas vocales conjunctas, quae secùs diphthongus habeantur.

Mistakes? Menda?
Corrigendum: non "antiquitorum" sed "antiquorum" (gratias, ingrid70)
Last edited by adrianus on Mon Mar 16, 2009 11:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby ingrid70 » Sun Mar 15, 2009 11:47 am

re 52:

As far as I know, antiquitus is the period; to speak of the ancients, you would use antiquus substantively; antiquorum here.

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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Mon Mar 16, 2009 11:48 am

Corrigendum: non "antiquitorum" sed "antiquorum"
You're right. Thanks, ingrid70.
Rectè dicis, ingrid70. Tibi gratiam habeo.
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby ingrid70 » Mon Mar 16, 2009 2:41 pm

re 51:

luna is female; and days are short as it is with 24 hours, leave alone with 21 ;-).

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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby ingrid70 » Mon Mar 16, 2009 2:46 pm

re 50:

necesse est singulus canditatus periculum patiatur

I thought singul* can only be used in the plural, meaning each one at a time? This sentence would be singuli candidati periculum patiantur, I think?

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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Mon Mar 16, 2009 5:59 pm

Again, thanks for the corrections, ingrid70. You're very kind. And "semel in viginti unâ horis"! My head is away with it!
Iterùm, ingrid70, de emendationibus tuis gratias tibi ago. Benignissima es. Et "semel in viginti unâ horis"! Mens mea alibi est!

Number 53. Numerus quinquaginta tres.
In spring, calves and lambs are born and the sheep are sheared. The farmer prepares the fields for grazing. To grow crops, he ploughs, harrows, sows seed and fertilizes. One year, he sows root crops (potato, turnip, beet, mangle, carrot, onion); the next year in the same field, he sows corn (wheat, oats, barley).
In summer, the animals are in heat. The grass and crops grow. The farmer kills the weeds. The grass is cut for silage or hay. It soon grows again for grazing. In the late summer, he cuts the corn in the cornfields and threshes it. He bags the grain to take to the mill to be ground. The corn stalks are called straw, used for cattle bedding and for thatching.
In the autumn, he harvests the root crops.
During winter, the farmer gives the stock (the cattle and sheep) hay and corn as feed. He repairs the walls, fences, hedges and out-houses.

Vere, vituli agnique nascuntur et peci detondentur. Agricola agros pascuos praeparat. Ut messes colat, arat, occat, semina seminat, fecundat. Primo anno, seminat tubera (solanum tuberosum, rapam, betam, betam vulgarem, carotam, caepam); secundo, in eundem agrum annonam (frumentum, avena, hordeum).
Aestate, bestiae ad venerem prureunt. Herba messesque crescunt. Agricola sarrit. Gramen pro faeno vel siro metitur. Mox gramen depascendi causâ recrescit. Sero aestate, annonam in segetibus demetit deteritque. Grana ab agricolâ in saccis colliguntur ut ad molam feruntur et moluntur. Stramen vocatur stipula annonae, quod pro cubile pecorum et tecto tegendo adhibet.
Autumno, agricola tubera colligit.
Hieme, is foenum annonamque ut pabulum pecibus (bobus ovibusque) praebit. Macerias saepimenta saepes tuguria reficit.

Corrections? Emendationes?
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Mon Mar 16, 2009 8:55 pm

Number 54. Numerus quinquaginta quattuor.
How pleasant it is to sit in the garden at the end of a day's work and quietly admire its pathways and beds, shapes and colours. Many gardens are designed with the express purpose of being admired, and they provide a peaceful sanctuary for rest and contemplation; others are sources of food (fruit and vegetables) and even of medicinal herbs.

The gardener's time is spent in tilling and fertilising the soil and in planting, watering, weeding and pruning. Very often, the gardener must protect the seeds and plants from pests such as birds and insects and from the worst effects of very hot and very cold weather. Without constant attention, the garden would soon return to a wild state; and that is part of its beauty.

Quam dulce est, fine diei negotiosi, in horto sedere et quietè admirari semitas, areas, figuras, colores. Multi horti intuendi causâ disertè finguntur, qui asyla quietudinis contemplationisque placida se offerunt; alii fontes ciborum (fructorum holerumque) etiam herbarum medicarum sunt.

Et in humo colendo ac laetificando et in seminando, irrigando, sarriendo et recidendo, hortulanus tempus impendit. Saepissimé, â cladibus ut aves ut bestiolae ut mala quae ex extremitatibus tempestatis oriuntur, hortulanus semina spirpesque tegere debet. Sine curâ assiduâ, hortus ad agrestem habitum revertat; sic partim est decoris eius.

Glitches? Maculae?
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Mon Mar 16, 2009 10:46 pm

Number 55. Numerus quinquaginta quinque.
Many people like to visit the beach during the hot weather to enjoy themselves, to lie on the sand in the sun and cool-off by swimming in the sea. Children, in particular, always enjoy playing barefoot in the sand, making sandcastles with a bucket and spade; or exploring rockpools with a net to catch crabs and jellyfish and other small fish; or seeing how well they can make flat stones skim over the sea's surface.
Even in wintertime, the beach can be fun when, wrapped up warmly, you watch the waves from the stormy sea crashing upon the shore.

Multi sunt qui tempestate calidâ ad pagum adire delectant ut sese oblectent, ut in arenâ sub sole jaceant et in mare natantes frigescant. Semper pedes nudi in arenâ ludendo vel in castellis situlâ ligoneque faciendis, liberi imprimìs fruuntur; non minùs in lacunis petrosis rete scrutandis ut cancros halipleumonesque ac alios pisces parvos illaqueent; etiam in specimine edendo artis sui perlaborandi calculos planos trans superficiem maris.
Hieme quidem, plagus tibi delicias offerat,—te, callido arctè collecto, undas quae de mare turbido in litus verberant spectante.

Lapses? Lapsus?
Corrigendum: "perlabendi" pro "perlaborandi" (Mens mihi nubilosa erat. Gratias, Thesaure)
Last edited by adrianus on Tue Mar 17, 2009 4:56 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby Interaxus » Tue Mar 17, 2009 1:48 am

Just wondering ... why 'pedes nudi' and not 'pedibus nudis'?

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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Tue Mar 17, 2009 12:17 pm

Salve Interaxe

De anglicè "barefoot", ecce quod scribit Ainsworth:

Ainsworth, 1808, wrote:Barefooted, Discalceatus, excalceatus
To run barefoot, Pede nudato currere
Barefoot and bare legged, Pedes & crura nudus

Note, "pede nudato" is adverbial, "pedes nudus" adjectival. When you consider the implications (the number and the use of "nudatus"—"made naked"), "pede nudato" is subtly better than "pedibus nudis", isn't it? And that lead me to consider the last ("pedes nudus") as an interesting and provocative form. I used it so that I could think about it and remember it. How subtle are the implications about what number the noun should have! Is it a wrong form? So, "she, fleet of foot", "he, strong in arm"? Do I misunderstand?

Nota, "pede nudato" collocatio adverbialis est, "pedes nudus" adjectiva. Significationibus cogitatis (cuius numeri est nomen, non minùs usus "nudatus" adjectivi), acutulum et melius "pede nudato" pro "pedibus nudis", nonné? Quae res me ultimam figuram ("pedes nudus") attractivam atque provocantem habere fecit. Eam scripsi ut cogitem et memoriâ teneam. Quàm astuta sunt implicationes ut cuius numeri sit nomen! Estne figura falsa? Sic, "ea, pedes velox", "is, bracchia validus"? Intellegone malé?
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby thesaurus » Tue Mar 17, 2009 2:01 pm

Perhaps you already know this, and perhaps this isn't what's at issue, but I believe "pedes nudus" is an example of of Synecdocical/Greek accusative, aka Accusative of Specification. So it seems to be legitimate for your purposes, as you already knew.

Vide:
http://books.google.com/books?id=Q7cAAA ... #PPA247,M1

One of the examples given is "nuda genu, with her knee bare (bare as to her knee)."

Fortasse iam scitis vel hic de hac re non argumentamini, sed arbitror "pedes nudus" exemplum esse puncti cuiusdam grammaticae, id est Casus Accusativus "Synecdocial" vel "Graecus" vel "Accusative of Specification." Ita finibus tuis aptum est, sicut auguratus es.
Unum exemplum datum est "nuda genu."
Horae quidem cedunt et dies et menses et anni, nec praeteritum tempus umquam revertitur nec quid sequatur sciri potest. Quod cuique temporis ad vivendum datur, eo debet esse contentus. --Cicero, De Senectute
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby thesaurus » Tue Mar 17, 2009 2:19 pm

etiam in specimine edendo artis sui perlaborandi calculos planos trans superficiem maris.


Also, it may be my particular dullness this morning, but in shouldn't it be "perlabendi" in this sentence? "perlabor, perlabi..." instead of "perlaboro, perlaborare..."

Hac in sententia etiam, etiamsi hoc mane habetor, nonne "perlabendi" pro "perlaborandi" praeferendum sit?
Horae quidem cedunt et dies et menses et anni, nec praeteritum tempus umquam revertitur nec quid sequatur sciri potest. Quod cuique temporis ad vivendum datur, eo debet esse contentus. --Cicero, De Senectute
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby Interaxus » Tue Mar 17, 2009 3:01 pm

Salve Adriane!

Fascinating! Thanks for sharing your insights (and thanks, Thesaurus, for naming the game :) ).

Just for the hell of it, I looked up ‘barefoot’ in the small dictionaries (Traupman, Cassell’s, Chambers Murray). They all give ‘nudis pedibus’ (adj & adv) or “pedibus nudis”. On the other hand, Google gives 4440 hits for “nudis pedibus”, 1340 hits for “pede nudo”, 1280 for “pedibus nudis”, 178 for “pedes nudi”, and 3 for “pede nudato” - but one of those last 3 leads to this magnificent Dictionary of Latin Phrases (English-Latin):

http://books.google.se/books?id=cI8SAAA ... #PPA104,M1

I expect you're already familiar with it.

I found this brief text on footwear interesting too:

http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/R ... lceus.html

My own favourite ‘pede’ is in

“Nunc est bibendum, nunc pede libero
pulsanda tellus’

and yes, that uses the singular form ...

Cheers,
Int
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Tue Mar 17, 2009 4:48 pm

Thesaurus wrote:Perhaps you already know this, and perhaps this isn't what's at issue, but I believe "pedes nudus" is an example of of Synecdocical/Greek accusative, aka Accusative of Specification. So it seems to be legitimate for your purposes, as you already knew.

If I had really known that, I would have said, because that's just perfect! That's great, Thesaurus.
Si id verè intellexissem, dixissem, quià tam aptum est! Benè factum, Thesaure!

Non "perlaborandi" sed "perlabendi" (55) —probè dicis. Me ineptum! Gratiam tibi.


Thanks for the link to that dictionary, Interaxus. I don't think I do have it.
Gratias, Interaxe, de nexu ad illud Robertson (1824) dictionarium. Non habeo, credo.
Last edited by adrianus on Tue Mar 17, 2009 5:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Tue Mar 17, 2009 5:13 pm

Number 56. Numerus quinquaginta sex.
The market is where you go to buy groceries and other things. Some markets are indoors, some outdoors. They consist of stalls, or small shops, where often you can buy direct from farmers and others who have themselves made what they are selling. Big supermarkets sell goods which are of a consistent standard, long shelf-life, and possibly cheaper because of volume sales. At the market, you will often find food products that are local, seasonal, individual and, although of shorter shelf-life, may often be better qualify than mass-produced ones. Of course, you may also find poor-quality products and unreliable traders. But when you get to know and trust the traders, going to the market is often a more enjoyable experience than going to the supermarket.

Forum est locus ubi ad obsonandum et alias res sumendas is. Quaedam fora intùs sunt, quaedam foràs. Constant ex catastis, seu tabernis minoribus, ubi tu frequenter ab agricolis aliisque qui ipsi res quas vendunt facti sunt emere potes. In superinstitoriis venduntur bona quae qualitatis constantis, vitae in pluteo longae, et fortassè vilioris pretii propter consumptionis magnitudinem sunt. Facilè in foro producta alimentaria invenis quae sunt regionalia, tempestiva, et nonnunquàm qualitatis superioris quàm illa in serie facta etsi vitae in pluteo longioris. Certè etiam, producta inferioris qualitatis et mercatores incertos invenias. Te autem conjunctiore credulioreque cum mercatoribus facto, saepè eo quod usu comperiris in foro plùs quàm eo in superinstitorio fruaris.

Weaknesses? Defectiones?
Last edited by adrianus on Tue Mar 17, 2009 8:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Tue Mar 17, 2009 8:32 pm

Number 57. Numerus quinquaginta septem.
Young children go to a primary school, or elementary school; older children to a secondary school, or high-school; infants to kindergarten. In a boarding school, boarders lodge on school premises, going home to parents or guardians at the weekends or during the holidays. Some schools are single-sex, some mixed-sex. Pupils often wear a uniform with the school badge. Lessons (based on subject curricula) take place in the classroom, and major exams (for diplomas, say) are often held in the study hall or gymnasium. Most schools have a playground and staff-room, and many also have a library, a dinner canteen and playing fields maintained by the caretaker or janitor.

Parvoli liberi ad scolam elementariam seu ludum litterarium obeunt; seniores liberi ad lyceum seu gymnasium; infantes ad ludum infantium. In oecotropheo, convictores in convictu intra fundos scholasticos habitant, qui solùm fine hebdomadis vel diebus feriatis domum ad parentes tutoresve (seu custodes) revertunt. Sunt alii scholae pro discipulis eiusdem generis, alii utriusque generis. Discipuli vestem distinctam cum insigne scholae gerere solent. Lectiones (in cursu studiorum fundata) in pergulo praecipiuntur, et probationes magni momenti (pro diplomis, exempli gratiâ) saepè in aulâ meditationis vel gymnasticâ tractantur. Magnâ in parte scholarum inveniuntur locus lusorius atriaque magistrorum, et in multis quoquè est bibliotheca, caupona, et campi lusorii quos curator vel janitor tuetur.

Faults? Culpae?
Last edited by adrianus on Wed Mar 18, 2009 12:16 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Wed Mar 18, 2009 11:28 am

Number 58. Numerus quinquaginta octo (duodesexaginta).
To weigh something on a mechanical balance, you put it on one pan of the weighing scales. Then, you continue to add and subtract weights to the other pan until both pans have the same weight and the scales are balanced. Because all the weights are marked, you just count what you put on. Electronic scales give the object's weight directly on a read-out panel. Scales may need to be adjusted to ensure that with the electronic scale, for instance, when no weight is placed on it, zero registers on the read-out, and in the case of the mechanical balance, when no weight is placed on the pans, that they are in equilibrium with the beam horizontal.

Ut aliquid in librâ mechanicâ pendas, in uno ê repositoriis (seu discis) librae, ponis. Tunc, pondera ad alium discum continuô addis vel subtrahis donec utrumque repositorium idem pondus habet et libra in aequipondio ponitur. Quià omne pondus quot pondo sit indicat, quantum posueris tantummodò numeras. Libra electronica quot pondò sit quaedam res statim in indicio optico monstrat. Forsan libram accomodari necesse sit ut, prae librâ electronicâ, nullo pondere in eâ posito, zerum in indicio legi manifestum sit; idem, prae librâ mechanicâ, cum nullo pondere in repositoriis, eam aequilibrem esse cum scapo ad libellam respondente.

Criticisms? Reprehensiones?
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Wed Mar 18, 2009 2:00 pm

Number 59. Numerus quinquaginta novem (undesexaginta).
The seasons are those times of the year which have characteristic weather. They are caused by the tilt of the earth on its axis as it travels around the sun. In temperate regions, there are four: spring, summer, autumn and winter; elsewhere, just two—a wet and dry season in the tropics, and summer and winter only in polar regions.

In northern temperate regions, spring includes March, April and May; summer June, July and August; autumn September, October, November; and winter December, January and February. In southern temperate regions, it is the opposite. In ancient times in Europe, spring began on Candlemas (2nd February), summer on Mayday (May 1st), autumn on Lammas (August 1st) and winter on Halloween (31st October).

Sunt tempora seu spatia in anno, tempestates nomine, quae tempestate assuetâ describuntur. Declinatione terrae in axe suo dum circùm solem navigat, sic factum est. Temperatis in terris, tempestates sunt quattuor: ver, aestas, autumnus, hiems; alibi solùm duae: humida aridaque in regionibus tropicis, idem modò aestas hiemsque in polaris.

Temperatis atque septentrionalibus in partibus, ver menses Martii Aprilis atque Maii includit; aestas Junii Julii Augusti; autumnus Septembris, Octobris, Novembris; hiems Decembris, Januarii, Februarii. Temperatis atque australibus in locis, adversum valet. Europâ temporibus antiquitis, coepit ver in Lychnocaiam (id est, die secundo mensis Februarii), aestas in Kalendas Maias (primo Maii), autumnus in Gulam Augusti (primo Augusti), hiems in vigiliam Omnium Sanctôrum (tricesimo primo Octobris).

Criticisms? Critica?
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Wed Mar 18, 2009 5:48 pm

Number 60. Numerus sexaginta.
Weather is the condition of the atmosphere at a given place, lasting for a certain period of time. Climate describes characteristic weather patterns of many years, or centuries even. Weather is caused by changes in atmospheric pressure, temperature, humidity, rainfall, cloudiness, wind speed and wind direction. It is also affected on land by a place's latitude, height above sea-level and nearness to mountains and large bodies of water. Near the equator the weather changes very little.

Winter is colder than summer, and often has rain, hail and snow. Spring is the time of new growth; autumn the time when leaves fall from the trees. Storms often occur in autumn and winter. In the early morning throughout the year, when dew is on the grass, a mist often forms and soon disappears.

Tempestas est aeris conditio in quodam loco, quae per quoddam spatium temporis manet. Clima, intrà alias significationes, exempla tempestatis per multos annos, imò saecula, assueta significat. De vicissitudinibus aeris, nempe pressurae, temperaturae, humoris, aquarum, nubum, celeritatis directionisque ventorum, tempestas creatur. Ità etiam in terrâ tempestatem movent: latitudo, altitudo super aequor maris et proximitas montium vel magnarum plagarum aquaticarum. Prope circulum aequinoctialem, tempestas minimè variat.

Hiems calidior quàm aestas est, et crebrò eo tempore pluit, grandinat, ningit. Ver est tempus crescendi novi, autumnus tempus cum folia de arboribus cadunt. Procellae autumno et hieme saepè eveniunt. Primo mane per totum annum, cum ros in gramine est, nebula frequenter inducitur, quae mox evanescit.

Problem bits? Vanae partes?
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Tue Mar 24, 2009 3:56 pm

Number 61. Numerus sexaginta unus.
unit = pars seu sectio
headquarters-staff indicator = signum legatorum praetoriorum
army group = complexus exercituum
fixed-wing medevac = asportatio alae fixae medica
mechanized armoured unit = pars machinationum cataphractarum
mortar unit = pars mortario bombardae
armour-track recovery unit = pars recuperationis taeniis [/rotulis/orbitis?] erucae cataphractis
surface-to-air air-defence missile launcher = depulsor superficie ad aerem missilum defensoriorum pro aere
short-range missile unit = pars missilum brevis jactûs
armoured-vehicle-launched bridge = pons vehiculo cataphracto deductus
fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicle = vehiculum aereum alae fixae inhabitabile
wheeled-and-tracked vehicle = vehiculum rotis et taeniis [/rotulis/orbitis?] erucae
service-support class I unit = pars muneribus sustinendis primae classis
field-artillery direct-fire gun = tormentum campestris artilleriae directo conjectu

Brighouse offences? Delicta custodiam poscentia?
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Wed Mar 25, 2009 4:04 pm

Number 62. Numerus sexaginta duo.
The road is made of earth, tar or cobblestones. Rainwater runs off the road surface into the gutter and down the drain. Directions are given on signposts along the road and distances are marked on milestones. Pedestrians walk on the pavement at the side of the road and vehicles and horse-riders travel along the central part, either on the left or the right, depending on the country. Types of vehicle include the car, van, lorry, tractor, bus, motorbike, bicycle, and horse-drawn cart.

The train travels on the railway track; the plane and helicopter in the air; the row-boat and barge on the canal; the motorboat, yacht, cargo ship and passenger-ferry at sea.

Via aut terrâ, aut pice, aut lapidibus stratis facta est. Aqua de superficie viae in canalem currit et cloacam descendit. Per fulcris signi secùs viam, directiones ad destinationes ostenduntur et distantiae in lapidis notantur. Pedites pavemento secundùm marginem viae ambulant et vehicula vel equites mediâ parte eunt, vel ad sinistram vel ad dextram propter fines. Genera vehiculorum sunt autocinetum, carruca, autocarrum, tractorium, vehiculum publicum, autobirota, birota, et plaustrum equo tractum.

Per ferratam viam it tramen; per aerem aeroplanum atque helicopterum; canale scapha barcaque; mare cymba automataria ac celox navisque et oneraria navis et epibatica.

Questionable bits? Res suspiciosae?
Last edited by adrianus on Thu Mar 26, 2009 2:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
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Re: Please advise if you see a mistake.

Postby adrianus » Wed Mar 25, 2009 5:34 pm

Number 63. Numerus sexaginta tres.
To keep healthy you must eat properly and exercise regularly. Eating contaminated food can make you sick; similarly, not properly cleaning both yourself and where you live can encourage parasites and germs. You can catch some ailments from other people or from animals. Most ailments, such as the cold or headaches, go away within a few days. Sometimes you need to see a doctor if you are in constant pain or are vomiting. You head to hospital for more serious problems. If you are ever unable to get there unassisted, or if you have been in a serious accident, you are brought there by ambulance.

Ut sanus maneas, probè edere et assiduè exercere debes. Cibo contaminato vescendo, te aegrum fieri facere potest; itidem, et te ipsum et ubi habites non rectè lavare, sic faciendo parasiti ac germina morbi citentur. Quosdam morbos ab hominibus animalibusve contrahas. Magna pars valitudinum, ut gravedo ut dolor capitis, in paucis diebus evanescunt. Interdùm te oportet medicum consulare, si continuò doles vel vomis. Prae gravioribus valetudinibus ad valetudinarium vadis. Si ibi ire sine auxilio non possis, vel si casum gravis tibi evenit, arcerâ eò afferris.

Oddities? Res dubiae?
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
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Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 9:45 pm

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