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How to study for a Latin Test

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How to study for a Latin Test

Postby LatinGirly » Tue Jul 08, 2008 10:27 pm

Hi -

I have my first test coming up for my college latin class. We have covered up to chapter 10 in wheelocks latin.

Here is what my teacher said:
The test will consist of a conjugation of a verb in present, imperfect and future with imperatives, Latin to English sentences taken from the text, English to Latin sentences taken from the book and 142 vocabulary words.

My question is I have no Idea everything I need to have memorized for this test. I am memorizing all the vocabulary words and their gender and all the conjugations and declenctions i've learned so far.

What else would you reccomend learning?

Thanks!!!!
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Postby G82. » Wed Jul 09, 2008 12:13 am

Hey!

Well, it really depends on how much time you've got to prepare and how much work you want to put into it. I haven't used Wheelock's textbook so I'm not sure exactly how much material you're supposed to have mastered but if your teacher said you only need to revise Present, Imperfect and Future Tense, it shouldn't be too difficult for you to get to grips with that in a few days.

The way I went about learning how to conjugate verbs was: I made a list with all possible verb endings. Once these were sorted in a coherent way, according to Tense, Mood, Voice, Number and Person, I conjugated all verbs I came across until I was confident in recognising different verb forms at a glance. (It's important to remember in which conjugation a verb is.) I remember it taking me about half an hour to fully conjugate a verb in all its possible forms, but it should take you much less than that.

Next, vocabulary. I consider flash cards the best way to learn vocab. Write the nom. sing. and gen. sing. form of a noun + gender on one side and the translation on the other; for verbs it's crucial to know the four principal parts and whether a particular verb takes a particular case (for example verbs of condemning take the gen. to express the penalty).

Make sure you've read all texts you are supposed to and can translate them. And if you want to go the extra mile, translate the texts in writing and then try to write them back into Latin a couple of days later.

Hope this helps and good luck!
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Postby Twpsyn » Wed Jul 09, 2008 12:50 am

If it's your first test, and you're as far as chapter ten, then you should know thoroughly everything in Wheelock's, chapters 1 through 10, and be able to produce from memory all the forms introduced therein. Simple as that! If you're still confused, why not ask your teacher? It is his or her course after all, not ours.
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Thanks!

Postby LatinGirly » Wed Jul 09, 2008 2:14 am

Thanks for the ideas everyone. That is helpful.
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Postby Interaxus » Thu Jul 10, 2008 12:55 am

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Postby Interaxus » Thu Jul 10, 2008 12:41 pm

So much for Wheelock and the 'analytical' approach. :oops:

Now go out and buy Lingua Latina by Hans Orberg and really learn Latin! :D

Cheers,
Int
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Postby Essorant » Fri Jul 11, 2008 6:28 am

Yet many people that have success with Lingua Latina do so because they have a foundation from learning from Wheelock first.
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