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Harrius Potter - stuck sum!

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Harrius Potter - stuck sum!

Postby phil » Thu Sep 25, 2003 8:34 pm

Hi all, I'm up to page 3, and there are two bits I can't understand. I'm hoping that some of you who bought the book can help.<br /><br />...(most of them had not seen an owl even at night)<br />quod tamen ad Dominum Dursley attinebat, matutinum tempus, ut fit, omnino strigibus vacabat. homines quinque increpuit.<br /><br />which, however held on to Mr Dursley, early in the morning, ut fit, entirely he emptied of owls. He rebuked five men.<br /><br />ut fit? in order to stay healthy? ;)<br /><br />And why suddenly five men? :-\<br /><br /><br />
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Re:Harrius Potter - stuck sum!

Postby benissimus » Thu Sep 25, 2003 11:41 pm

the word ut is not just used in result clauses - notice the lack of subjunctive fiat. In this case it means "as it becomes (the morning)".
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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Re:Harrius Potter - stuck sum!

Postby whiteoctave » Fri Sep 26, 2003 12:13 am

A very cheeky sentence indeed.<br /><br />I have no access to the latin context, nor any velleity to read any Potter, but I would hazard that that meant:<br /><br />The time of morning [lit. morning time], however, which [I don't think "quod" can be the relative pronoun of owl because if, as you say, "owl" is the antecedent, "bubo", "strix" and the wonderfully onomatopoeic "ulula" - the only words for owl i know - being masc., fem. and fem. respectively, do not agree -"quod" agrees instead with neuter "tempus"] was concerning Master Dursley [attineo is here used intransitively (i.e. not taking a direct object) and in this sense means "concern...", "relating to...". The meaning is thus a poetically drawn out way of saying "Mr Dursely's morning"], was, as usual [lit. as happens], completely free of [lit. from] owls. [Then as an explanation of his normality] He shouted at five people [My sister informs me his a rather malcontent character?].<br /><br />So, in summation:<br /><br />Master Dursley's morning, however, was, as usual, completely free of owls. He shouted at five people.<br /><br />If someone could verify with the book whether this makes sense, that'd help. Was there an owl epidemic?<br /><br />~dave<br />
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Re:Harrius Potter - stuck sum!

Postby phil » Fri Sep 26, 2003 12:32 am

Indeed there was a parliament of owls in the street below, and Mr D. was unaware of them. Thanks Dave! How you worked that out, without even the context is impressive, bordering on spooky ;)<br /><br />Thanks!<br />
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Re:Harrius Potter - stuck sum!

Postby MDS » Fri Sep 26, 2003 1:03 am

That was an excellent extrapolation!<br /><br />I have my copy waiting for me at my house and cannot wait for Christmas when I can read (try to at least) it!<br /><br />Enjoy the book!
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