Textkit Logo

"Quod nomen vobis est"

Here you can discuss all things Latin. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get help with a difficult passage of Latin, and more.

"Quod nomen vobis est"

Postby Lord_WayneY » Fri Oct 19, 2018 6:00 am

In the text book Evagrius Magister, schola I, I saw a paragraph:

Magister: "Et quod nomen vobis est?"
Discipulus: "Mihi nomen est Rufinus."
Discipulus: "Horatius mihi nomen est."

Here, "nomen" is sigular, followed by "est", but "vobis" is plural form of "tibi". According to the response of students, their names are different with each other, which means there are multiple names in total. I do not understand, why could it not be "nomina vobis sunt"?

And question 2, why it is "quod", but not "quid". I have seen "quid est nomen tibi" many times and this sounds more reasonable. What does "quod" at here mean? Is it exchangeable with "quid"?
Civis Sinensis.
I am here not only to learn Latin, but also English.
Lord_WayneY
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Nov 04, 2013 1:20 am

Re: "Quod nomen vobis est"

Postby Nesrad » Fri Oct 19, 2018 9:12 am

Lord_WayneY wrote: Magister: "Et quod nomen vobis est?"
Discipulus: "Mihi nomen est Rufinus."
Discipulus: "Horatius mihi nomen est."

Here, "nomen" is sigular, followed by "est", but "vobis" is plural form of "tibi". According to the response of students, their names are different with each other, which means there are multiple names in total. I do not understand, why could it not be "nomina vobis sunt"?


I believe this is Latin idiom. It asks "what is your (pl.) name" where English asks "what are your names".

And question 2, why it is "quod", but not "quid". I have seen "quid est nomen tibi" many times and this sounds more reasonable. What does "quod" at here mean? Is it exchangeable with "quid"?


"Quis, quid" is a pronoun, "qui, quae, quod" is an adjective that agrees with a noun.
I humbly suggest you use a real textbook that teaches grammar. No-grammar talky methods are overrated.
Nesrad
Textkit Fan
 
Posts: 310
Joined: Thu Nov 01, 2012 1:10 pm

Re: "Quod nomen vobis est"

Postby Lord_WayneY » Fri Oct 19, 2018 1:13 pm

Very thanks for your replying.

Nesrad wrote:I believe this is Latin idiom. It asks "what is your (pl.) name" where English asks "what are your names".


Then does this usage only apply to this condition, or could be used quite common? If I say "Ubi est casa vobis" , is it still legal in grammar?

And what happend if those two students are in a group which has a group name? How could they distinguish this quetsion is for their own names or the group name?

"Quis, quid" is a pronoun, "qui, quae, quod" is an adjective that agrees with a noun.
I humbly suggest you use a real textbook that teaches grammar. No-grammar talky methods are overrated.


Still a little confused here. Which noun does the "quod" agree with? I see this kind of sentence as a structure of :
A est B
then, in " Quid est nomen tibi", it is: A = quid B = nomen tibi;
in "Quod est nomen vobis", is it: A = quod nomen B = vobis ?
Civis Sinensis.
I am here not only to learn Latin, but also English.
Lord_WayneY
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Nov 04, 2013 1:20 am

Re: "Quod nomen vobis est"

Postby Rufus Coppertop » Thu Oct 25, 2018 9:27 am

Lord_WayneY wrote:Very thanks for your replying.

Nesrad wrote:I believe this is Latin idiom. It asks "what is your (pl.) name" where English asks "what are your names".


Then does this usage only apply to this condition, or could be used quite common? If I say "Ubi est casa vobis" , is it still legal in grammar?

And what happend if those two students are in a group which has a group name? How could they distinguish this quetsion is for their own names or the group name?

"Quis, quid" is a pronoun, "qui, quae, quod" is an adjective that agrees with a noun.
I humbly suggest you use a real textbook that teaches grammar. No-grammar talky methods are overrated.


Still a little confused here. Which noun does the "quod" agree with? I see this kind of sentence as a structure of :
A est B
then, in " Quid est nomen tibi", it is: A = quid B = nomen tibi;
in "Quod est nomen vobis", is it: A = quod nomen B = vobis ?


Nomen - 3rd declension neuter nominative singular - NAME.
Quod - interrogative adjective - neuter nominative singular - WHAT?
Rufus Coppertop
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Fri Jun 05, 2009 3:55 pm

Re: "Quod nomen vobis est"

Postby Barry Hofstetter » Thu Oct 25, 2018 11:44 am

Lord_WayneY wrote:Very thanks for your replying.

Nesrad wrote:I believe this is Latin idiom. It asks "what is your (pl.) name" where English asks "what are your names".


Then does this usage only apply to this condition, or could be used quite common? If I say "Ubi est casa vobis" , is it still legal in grammar?


No. Latin here would not use a pronoun, but the possessive adjective, casa vestra.

The good news: extrapolating and thinking about how the language is working is a good thing. The bad news (well, not really bad), hold any conclusions beyond what the book is actually teaching you tentatively because new information might overturn what you are thinking. Languages don't always work in a way that seems logical to the learner.

And what happend if those two students are in a group which has a group name? How could they distinguish this quetsion is for their own names or the group name?


Not sure altogether what a group name would be, but let's say they are brothers, Gaius Caecilianus Turpissimus and Quintus Caecilianus Stultissimus. They could then say "nomen nobis Caecilianum est" or some variant thereof.
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
The Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
καὶ σὺ τὸ σὸν ποιήσεις κἀγὼ τὸ ἐμόν. ἆρον τὸ σὸν καὶ ὕπαγε.
Barry Hofstetter
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 627
Joined: Thu Aug 15, 2013 12:22 pm


Return to Learning Latin