Textkit Logo

Fabula syrae Orpheus et Eurydicē

Here you can discuss all things Latin. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get help with a difficult passage of Latin, and more.

Fabula syrae Orpheus et Eurydicē

Postby Sofronios » Tue Jul 24, 2018 7:15 am

and again, my other attempt to digest Miraglia's
this time the miserable, heartbreaking and horror story of orpheus and his undead lover.

1 Orpheus nobilissimus fidicen atque poeta egregius fuit, qui inde ā puerō tam pulchrē canebat, ut non solum bestiae ferae ad eum accurerent,....
how to render unde ab in this sentence? the given clue indicates that inde ab is antonymous with usque ad. so can we read this as, 'Orpheus the famous musician and outstanding poet, who from the time that the boy sang beautifully, so that not only the wild beasts hurried towards him...'

16...Aristaeus, ...., cum sē nihil iam ex virgine sperare posse videret.
now refer to his rival, cum + subj videret can we read this sentence as 'since clause'?
'since it seems to him that he was not able to hope from the girl'

and the last
49 Quod vero cum sē haud facile impetrare posse videret, interrogavit num sibi liceret carmen canere.
since it seems to him that being able to secure(the request) is not easy, he asked so that he might sing a song

thx in advance for the corrigenda
ὁ δὲ εἶπε· πῶς γὰρ ἂν δυναίμην, ἐὰν μή τις ὁδηγήσῃ με;
Qui ait : Et quomodo possum, si non aliquis ostenderit mihi ?
User avatar
Sofronios
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 80
Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2014 2:27 am
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia

Re: Fabula syrae Orpheus et Eurydicē

Postby Shenoute » Tue Jul 24, 2018 9:09 am

Hello,

1 puero refers to Orpheus, lit. "from child" > "from his childhood"

16 Yes, it is possible but hard to say without context. Cum+subj. clauses can indicate "when/because/although": "...when/because/although he saw that he could hope for nothing from the girl...".

49 Quod vero cum sē haud facile impetrare posse videret, interrogavit num sibi liceret carmen canere.
Quod functions here as a connecting relative pronoun, a very common construction. It is somehow like having et id. Num introduces an indirect question "wether...":
"And when/although/because he saw that he could not obtain it easily, he asked wether it would be allowed to him to sing a song."
Shenoute
Textkit Fan
 
Posts: 277
Joined: Tue Jun 04, 2013 12:23 pm


Return to Learning Latin