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A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

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A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby pin130 » Sun Jun 24, 2018 4:50 am

After Wheelock's and Lingua Latina (several times and still lacking a solid grasp/memory of grammar) I'm
making my way through Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles, I've been using Geoffrey Steadman's PDF with his helpful
notes and Angela Thomas' more extensive notes and translation. Unfortunately, Ms Thomas didn't quite
finish Ritchie's. She did 86 out of 100 chapters. Does anyone know of a translation of the remaining 14
(and most difficult) chapters? Seems like this would not be too difficult for someone who is fluent and it
would benefit those approaching the intermediate level. There is a translation available on Amazon, but I
think it a waste to put out $9.00 just for the last 14 chapters.
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Sun Jun 24, 2018 5:38 pm

I could easily translate the remaining 14 chapters. I could use the same format that Angela Thomas used even, so to complete her work. It appears that Angela Thomas was a retired Latin teacher when she started her work on the Fabulae Faciles. Perhaps something happened to her before she could finish. :(

By the way, if anybody wanted to know about the PDF from Geoffrey Steadman that pin130 mentionned, here is the link:
https://geoffreysteadman.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/ritchie-10mar17.pdf

It'll take me a little while to do everything though. Angela herself did about one section per week. Would you be interested in me getting all the literal translations (all the sections "c)") done first?
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Sun Jun 24, 2018 6:26 pm

Here's a literal translation of all phrases in chapter 87, A Plan for Vengeance, in the style of Angela Thomas.

First, Angela's obligatory warning:
Note: This section is not translated into idiomatic English but is intended, together with the notes, to give you the gist of the meaning; you can then come up with your own improved translation. Sentences marked with * need particular attention to turn them into correct English.

Orta luce
Light having arisen*
Polyphemus iam e somno excitatus
Polyphemus already awoken from sleep
idem quod hesterno die fecit;
did the same as the previous day;
correptis enim duobus e reliquis viris
two of the soldiers left having been snatched up
carnem eorum sine mora devoravit.
he swallowed down their flesh without delay.
Tum, cum saxum amovisset,
Then, when he moved the rock,
ipse cum pecore suo ex spelunca progressus est;
he walked forward with his flock out of the cave;
quod cum Graeci viderent,
when the Greeks saw this,
magnam in spem se post paulum evasuros venerunt.
they came in great hope that they would escape a little later.
Mox tamen ab hac spe repulsi sunt;
Soon however they were repelled from this hope;*
nam Polyphemus, postquam omnes oves exierunt,
because Polyphemus, after all the sheep went out,
saxum in locum restituit.
placed the rock back in place.
Reliqui omni spe salutis deposita
The ones left behind, all hope of safety having been put aside,
lamentis lacrimisque se dediderunt;
gave themselves up with lamentations and tears;
Ulixes vero, qui, ut supra demonstravimus,
Ulixes, however, who, as we demonstrated above,
vir magni fuit consili,
was a man of great understanding/sense,
etsi intellegebat rem in discrimine esse,
even if he understood the thing was in crisis,*
nondum omnino desperabat.
he was still not despairing at all.
Tandem, postquam diu haec toto animo cogitavit,
In the end, after he thought about these things for a long time with all his soul,
hoc consilium cepit.
he took (adopted) this plan.
E lignis quae in spelunca reposita erant
From the pieces of wood that were stored in the cave,
palum magnum delegit.
he chose a large stake.
Hunc summa cum diligentia praeacutum fecit;
This he made very pointed with the greatest attentiveness;
tum, postquam sociis quid fieri vellet ostendit,
then, after he showed to his companions what he wanted to be done,
reditum Polyphemi exspectabat.
he awaited the return of Polyphemus.
Last edited by Ser on Sun Jun 24, 2018 8:47 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby pin130 » Sun Jun 24, 2018 8:09 pm

Thank you very much for your help Seraphinus. Yes, I think to do section C (translation) first makes sense in
terms of my needs at the moment. I'm up to chapter 77 and I've been averaging about 7 or 8 chapters per
week. Though if you could eventually complete Angela Thomas' excellent notes as well I'm sure many would
benefit. Thanks again!
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Sun Jun 24, 2018 9:02 pm

Here's a literal translation of all phrases in chapter 88, A Glass Too Much, in the style of Angela Thomas.

First, Angela's obligatory warning:
Note: This section is not translated into idiomatic English but is intended, together with the notes, to give you the gist of the meaning; you can then come up with your own improved translation. Sentences marked with * need particular attention to turn them into correct English.

Sub vesperum Polyphemus ad speluncam rediit,
Near the evening Polyphemus returned to the cave,
et eodem modo quo antea cenavit.
and in the same manner as before ate dinner.
Tum Ulixes utrem vini prompsit,
Then Ulixes brought forth a wineskin,
quem forte (id quod ei erat saluti) secum attulerat;
which (as it was a refuge him) by chance he had carried with him;
et postquam magnum poculum vino complevit,
and after he filled a large cup with wine,
monstrum ad bibendum provocavit.
he called forth the monster for him to drink it.
Polyphemus, qui numquam antea vinum gustaverat,
Polyphemus, who had never tasted wine before,
totum poculum statim exhausit;
drank up the entire cup;
quod cum fecisset, tantam voluptatem percepit
when he did this, he felt such a great delight
ut iterum et tertium poculum repleri iusserit.
that he ordered to have the cup refilled a second and a third time.
Tum, cum quaesivisset quo nomine Ulixes appellaretur,
Then, when he asked by what name Ulixes was called,*
ille respondit se Neminem appellari;
he answered he was called "Nobody";
quod cum audivisset, Polyphemus ita locutus est:
when he heard this, Polyphemus spoke thus:
"Hanc tibi gratiam pro tanto beneficio referam;
"I will return a benefit to you due to such a great favor (from you);
te postremum omnium devorabo."
I will swallow you down last of all."
Hoc cum dixisset,
When he had said this,
cibo vinoque gravis recubuit
he lied down (feeling) heavy from the food and the wine
et brevi tempore somno oppressus est.
and in a short time he was overpowered by sleep.*
Tum Ulixes sociis convocatis,
Then Ulixes, his companions having been called together,
"Habemus," inquit, "quam petivimus facultatem,
said, "We have the opportunity we sought,
ne igitur tantam occasionem rei gerendae omittamus."
may we not therefore neglect such a great chance to carry out the matter."
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Sun Jun 24, 2018 9:59 pm

Here's a literal translation of all phrases in chapter 89, The Blinding of Polyphemus, in the style of Angela Thomas.

First, Angela's obligatory warning:
Note: This section is not translated into idiomatic English but is intended, together with the notes, to give you the gist of the meaning; you can then come up with your own improved translation. Sentences marked with * need particular attention to turn them into correct English.

Hac oratione habita,
This speech having been made,
postquam extremum palum igni calefecit,
after making the tip of the stake hot with fire,
oculum Polyphemi dormientis ferventi ligno perfodit;
he digged through the eye of sleeping Polyphemus with the glowing piece of wood;
quo facto
this having been done
omnes in diversas speluncae partes se abdiderunt.
everyone hid themselves in different parts of the cave.
At ille
But he (Polyphemus)
subito illo dolore oculi e somno excitatus
having been awoken from sleep due to the sudden pain of his eye
clamorem terribilem sustulit,
raised a dreadful roar,
et dum per speluncam errat,
and while he wandered throughout the cave,*
Ulixem manu prehendere conabatur;
he tried to seize Ulysses with his hand;
cum tamen iam omnino caecus esset,
but as he was completely blind already,
nullo modo hoc efficere potuit.
in no way he could do this.
Interea reliqui Cyclopes,
Meanwhile the other Cyclopes,
clamore audito,
the roat having been heard,
undique ad speluncam convenerunt,
came together from all parts to the cave,
et ad introitum adstantes quid Polyphemus ageret quaesiverunt,
and standing at the entrance they asked what Polyphemus was doing,
et quam ob causam tantum clamorem sustulisset.
and for what reason he had raised such a roar.
Ille respondit se graviter vulneratum esse
He replied that he was seriously wounded,
et magno dolore adfici.
and was afflicted by great pain.
Cum tamen postea quaesivissent quis ei vim intulisset,
But afterward when they asked who had brought (violent) force into him,*
respondit ille Neminem id fecisse;
he answered that Nobody had done it;
quibus rebus auditis
these things having been heard
unus e Cyclopibus:
one of the Cyclopes
"At si nemo," inquid, "te vulneravit,
said, "But if nobody wounded you,
haud dubium est quin consilio deorum,
there is not doubt that by the will of the Gods,
quibus resistere nec possumus nec volumus,
whom we cannot resist nor do we want to resist,
hoc supplicio adficiaris."
you are afflicted by this punishment."
Hoc cum dixisset,
When he had said this,
abierunt Cyclopes
the Cyclopes went away
eum in insaniam incidisset arbitrati.
having judged he had fallen into insanity.
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Sun Jun 24, 2018 10:01 pm

Here's a literal translation of all phrases in chapter 90, The Escape, in the style of Angela Thomas.

First, Angela's obligatory warning:
Note: This section is not translated into idiomatic English but is intended, together with the notes, to give you the gist of the meaning; you can then come up with your own improved translation. Sentences marked with * need particular attention to turn them into correct English.

Polyphemus, ubi socios suos abiisse sensit,
Polyphemus, when he noticed his companions had gone away,
furore atque amentia impulsus
driven by rage and madness
Ulixem iterum quaerere coepit;
tried to look for Ulysses a second time.
tandem cum portam invenisset,
in the end when he found the entrance,
saxum quo obstructa erat amovit,
he moved away the rock with which it was blocked,
ut pecus in agros exiret.
so that the flock could go out into the fields.
Tum ipse in introitu consedit,
Then he sat down at the entryway,
et ut quaeque ovis ad hunc locum venerat,
and as each sheep came to this place,
eius tergum manibus tractabat,
he touched their back with his hands,
ne viri inter oves exire possent.
so that the men could not go out among the sheep.
Quod cum animadvertisset Ulixes,
When Ulysses observed this,
intellexit omnem spem salutis
he understood that all hope of safety
in dolo magis quam in virtute poni.
was placed more in deceit than in virtue.
Itaque hoc consilium iniit.
Consequently he initiated this plan.
Primum tres quas vidit pinguissimas ex ovibus delegit,
First he chose three of the sheep which he saw very fat,
quas cum inter se viminibus coniunxisset,
(and) when he joined them to one another with willow twigs,
unum ex sociis suis ventribus earum ita subiecit
he put one of his companions under their bellies in such a way
ut omnino lateret;
so he'd lie completely hidden;
deinde oves hominem secum ferentes ad portam egit.
then he led the sheep carrying men to the entrance.
Id accidit quod fore suspicatus erat.
What he had suspected would be happened.*
Polyphemus enim postquam terga ovium manibus tractavit,
Polyphemus after touching the backs of the sheep with his hands,
eas praeterire passus est.
let them pass by.
Ulixes ubi rem tam feliciter evenisse vidit,
Ulysses when he saw that the matter had turned out so favorably,
omnes socios suos ex ordine eodem modo emisit;
he sent out all his companions in turn in the same way;
quo facto ipse novissimus evasit.
this having been done he himself escaped last.
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Fri Jun 29, 2018 2:15 am

Here's a literal translation of all phrases in chapter 91, Out of Danger, in the style of Angela Thomas.

First, Angela's obligatory warning:
Note: This section is not translated into idiomatic English but is intended, together with the notes, to give you the gist of the meaning; you can then come up with your own improved translation. Sentences marked with * need particular attention to turn them into correct English.

His rebus ita confectis,
These things having been accomplished thus,*
Ulixes veritus ne Polyphemus fraudem sentiret,
Ulysses fearing that Polyphemus would notice the deceit,
cum sociis quam celerrime ad litus contendit;
rushed to the shore with his companions as fast as possible;
quo cum venissent,
when he had come there,
ab eis qui navi praesidio relicti erant
by those who had been left as protection for the ship
magna cum laetitia excepti sunt.
they were received with great joy.
Hi enim cum anxiis animis iam tres dies continuos
After all when these men for three successive days already with anxious feelings
reditum eorum expectavissent,
had awaited their return,
suspicati (id quidem quod erat)
suspecting that (as it in fact was)
eos in aliquod periculum magnum incidisse,
they had fallen upon some great danger,
ipsi auxiliandi causa egredi parabant.
they were preparing to go out to help (them).
Tum Ulixes non satis tutum arbitratus in eo loco manere,
Ulysses then, having judged that remaining in that place was not safe enough,
quam celerrime proficisci constituit.
decided to depart as fast as possible.
Iussit igitur omnes navem conscendere,
He therefore ordered everybody to board the ship,
et ancoris sublatis
and the anchors having been lifted
paulum a litore in altum provectus est.
in a short while he departed from the shore into the deep (the sea).
Tum magna voce exclamavit:
Then with a loud voice he shouted:
"Tu, Polypheme, qui iura hospiti spernis,
"Polyphemus, you who rejects rights to a guest,
iustam et debitam poenam immanitatis tuae solvisti."
you have paid back your cruelty with a just and due punishment."
Hac voce audita
This voice having been heard
Polyphemus ira vehementer commotus
Polyphemus moved vehemently with anger
ad mare se contulit,
he went towards the sea,
et ubi navem paulum a litore remotam esse intellexit,
and when he understood that the ship was (just) a little removed from the shore,
saxum ingens manu correptum
a large rock grabbed with (his) hand
in eam partem coniecit
he threw in that part
unde vocem venire sensit.
from which he had perceived the voice coming.
Graeci autem, etsi non multum afuit quin submergerentur,
The Greeks, however, even though it wasn't long since they had plunged (the ship into the sea)
nullo damno accepto
no damage having been received
cursum tenuerunt.
they held the course (of the ship).
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Fri Jun 29, 2018 2:50 am

Here's a literal translation of all phrases in chapter 92, The Country of the Winds, in the style of Angela Thomas.

First, Angela's obligatory warning:
Note: This section is not translated into idiomatic English but is intended, together with the notes, to give you the gist of the meaning; you can then come up with your own improved translation. Sentences marked with * need particular attention to turn them into correct English.

Pauca milia passuum ab eo loco progressus
Having gone forward for a few thousands of paces away from that place*
Ulixes ad insulam Aeoliam navem appulit.
Ulysses put the ship ashore at the island of Aeolia.
Haec patria erat ventorum,
This was that country of the winds,
"Hic vasto rex Aeolus antro
Here, in a huge cave, king Aeolus
luctantes ventos tempestatesque sonoras imperio premit
keeps the wrestling winds and the loud storms in check with his power
ac vinclis et carcere frenat."
and restrains them with chains and prison."
Ibi rex ipse Graecos hospitio excepit,
There the kind himself welcomed the Greeks with hospitality,
atque eis persuasit
and persuaded them
ut ad recuperandas vires paucos dies in ea regione commorarentur.
so that they would stop for a few days in the region to recover their strength.
Septimo die,
On the seventh day,
cum socii e laboribus se recepissent,
when the companions (of Ulysses) had recovered from their hardships,
Ulixes, ne anni tempore a navigatione excluderetur,
Ulysses, so that he would not be prevented from navigating for the duration of a year,
sibi sine mora proficiscendum statuit.
decided to depart without delay.
Tum Aeolus, qui sciebat Ulixem cupidissimum esse patriae videndae,
Then Aeolus, who knew Ulysses was very much longing to see his native land again,
ei iam profecturo magnum saccum e corio confectum dedit,
to him, already departing, gave a big bag made of leather,
in quo ventos omnes praeter unum incluserat.
in which he had imprisoned all the winds except for one.
Zephyrum tantum solverat,
He had left only the Zephyrus wind free,
quod ille ventus ab insula Aeolia ad Ithacam naviganti est secundus.
because that wind is favorable to whoever navigates from the island of Aeolia to Ithaca.
Ulixes hoc donum libenter accepit,
Ulysses gladly received this gift,
et gratiis pro tanto beneficio actis
and thanks for such a great favor having been given*
saccum ad malum alligavit.
he tied the bag to a mast.
Tum omnibus rebus ad profectionem paratis
Then, everything for setting off having been prepared
meridiano fere tempore e portu solvit.
he set sail out of the port at almost midday time.
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Fri Jun 29, 2018 5:32 pm

Here's a literal translation of all phrases in chapter 93, The Wind-bag, in the style of Angela Thomas.

First, Angela's obligatory warning:
Note: This section is not translated into idiomatic English but is intended, together with the notes, to give you the gist of the meaning; you can then come up with your own improved translation. Sentences marked with * need particular attention to turn them into correct English.

Novem dies secundissimo vento cursum tenuerunt,
With a favorable wind they held course for nine days,
iamque in conspectum patriae suae venerant,
and they had come in sight of their native land already,
cum Ulixes lassitudine confectus
when Ulysses, consumed by exhaustion,
(ipse enim gubernabat)
(he himself was steering)
ad quietem capiendam recubuit.
lied down to take a rest.
At socii, qui iam dudum mirabantur
But his companions, who were wondering for a while already
quid in illo sacco inclusum esset,
what was enclosed in that bag,
cum ducem somno oppressum viderent,
when they saw their leader overpowered by sleep,
tantam occasionem non omitendam arbitrati sunt;
they judged that so great an opportunity was not to be neglected;*
credebant enim aurum et argentum ibi esse celata.
as they believed that gold and silver were hidden there.
Itaque spe lucri adducti
Therefore, having been lead by hope for profit,
saccum sine mora solverunt,
they untied the bag without delay,
quo facto
this having been done
venti "velut agmine facto,
the winds "just as, a battle line having been done,
qua data porta, ruunt
rush where the door was given,
et terras turbine perflant."
they blow even the land with a whirlwind."
Hic tanta tempestas subito coörta est
Here such a great storm suddenly arose
ut illi cursum tenere non possent
that they could not hold course
sed in eandem partem unde erant profecti referrentur.
but were (instead) taken back to the same part where they had set sail from.
Ulixes e somno excitatus
Ulysses, awoken from sleep,
quo in loco res esset statim intellexit;
immediately understood in what place the matter was;*
saccum solutum, Ithacam post tergum relictam vidit.
he saw (both) the bag untied and the Ithaca (that had been) left behind.
Tum vero ira vehementer exarsit
Then he certainly cought "fire" vehemently in anger
sociosque obiurgabat quod cupiditate pecuniae adducti
he scolded his companions because, lead by desire for money,
spem patriae videndae proiecissent.
they had thrown away the hope of seeing their native land.
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Fri Jun 29, 2018 5:50 pm

Here's a literal translation of all phrases in chapter 94, A Drawing of Lots, in the style of Angela Thomas.

First, Angela's obligatory warning:
Note: This section is not translated into idiomatic English but is intended, together with the notes, to give you the gist of the meaning; you can then come up with your own improved translation. Sentences marked with * need particular attention to turn them into correct English.

Brevi spatio intermisso,
A short span having elapsed,*
Graeci insulae cuidam appropinquaverunt
the Greeks approached a certain island
in qua Circe, filia Solis, habitabat.
in which Circe, daughter of the Sun, lived.
Quo cum navem appulisset,
When the ship landed ashore there,
Ulixes in terram frumentandi causa egrediendum esse statuit;
Ulysses determined that they should disembark for the sake of foraging;
nam cognoverat frumentum quod in navi haberent iam deficere.
as he knew that the grain that they had in the ship was waning already.
Sociis igitur ad se convocatis
His companions having been therefore called together
quo in loco res esset et quid fieri vellet ostendit.
he showed (them) in what place the matter was and what he wanted to be done.
Cum tamen omnes memoria tenerent
However, as every one held in memory
quam crudeli morte necati essent ei qui nuper e navi egressi essent,
what cruel death those who had gone out of the ship recently had been killed with,
nemo repertus est qui hoc negotium suscipere vellet.
no one who wanted to carry out the work was found.
Quae cum ita essent,
When these things had been thus,*
res ad controversiam deducta est.
the matter was brought to contention.
Tandem Ulixes consensu omnium
In the end Ulysses, with the consensus of all,
socios in duas partes divisit,
divided his companions in two parts,
quarum alteri Eurylochus, vir summae virtutis, alteri ipse praeesset.
of which Eurylochus, a man of great virtue, was to lead one and Ulysses the other.
Tum hi inter se sortiti sunt
Then these men chose by lot between themselves
uter in terram egrederetur.
which of the two would go out into the land.
Hoc facto, Eurylocho sorte evenit
This having been done, it fell upon Eurylochus by chance
ut cum duobus et viginti sociis rem susciperet.
that he would carry out the matter with twenty-two companions.
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Fri Jun 29, 2018 6:09 pm

Here's a literal translation of all phrases in chapter 95, The House of the Enchantress, in the style of Angela Thomas.

First, Angela's obligatory warning:
Note: This section is not translated into idiomatic English but is intended, together with the notes, to give you the gist of the meaning; you can then come up with your own improved translation. Sentences marked with * need particular attention to turn them into correct English.

His rebus ita constitutis
These things having been decided
ei qui sortiti erant
those who had been chosen by lot
in interiorem partem insulae profecti sunt.
set out into the interior of the island.
Tantus tamen timor animos eorum occupaverat
However, so great a fear seized their spirits
ut nihil dubitarent quin morti obviam irent.
that not at all did they doubt they would encounter death.
Vix quidem poterant ei qui in navi relicti erant lacrimas tenere;
Those who were being left in the ship could hardly contain their tears;
credebant enim se socios suos numquam post hoc tempus visuros.
they thought that they were never going to see their companions after this time.
Illi autem aliquantum itineris progressi
They, however, having marched forth for some of the journey
ad villam quandam pervenerunt summa magnificentia aedificatam,
they arrived at a certain villa built with the greatest splendor,
cuius ad ostium cum adiissent, cantum dulcissimum audiverunt.
(and) when they went to its gate, they heard very sweet singing.
Tanta autem fuit eius vocis dulcedo
So great, however, was the sweetness of that voice
ut nullo modo retineri possent quin ianuam pulsarent.
that they could not contain themselves in any way from knowing on the door.
Hoc facto
This having been done
ipsa Circe foras exiit,
Circe herself went outside,
et summa cum benignitate omnes in hospitium invitavit.
and with the greatest kindness invited every one into hospitality.
Eurylochus insidias sibi comparari suspicatus
Eurylochus, having suspected an ambush being prepared to them,
foris exspectare constituit,
decided to wait outside,
sed reliqui rei novitate adducti intraverunt.
but the rest, lead by novelty of the mattered, went inside.
Cenam magnificam omnibus rebus instructam invenerunt
They found a splendid dinner equipped with all things
et iussu dominae libentissime accubuerunt.
and by order of the lady they lied at the dinner most gladly.
At Circe vinum quod servi apposuerunt medicamento quodam miscuerat;
But Circe had mixed the wine the servants placed with a certain drug;
quod cum Graeci bibissent,
which, when the Greeks drank it,
gravi somno subito oppressi sunt.
they were overpowered suddenly by heavy sleep.
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Fri Jun 29, 2018 6:27 pm

Here's a literal translation of all phrases in chapter 96, The Charm, in the style of Angela Thomas.

First, Angela's obligatory warning:
Note: This section is not translated into idiomatic English but is intended, together with the notes, to give you the gist of the meaning; you can then come up with your own improved translation. Sentences marked with * need particular attention to turn them into correct English.

Tum Circe, quae artis magicae summam scientiam habebat,
Then Circe, who had the greatest knowledge of magic,
baculo aureo quod gerebat capita eorum tetigit;
touched their heads with a staff of gold that she carried;
quo facto omnes in porcos subito conversi sunt.
this having been done, everyone was suddenly transformed into a pig.
Interea Eurylochus ignarus quid in aedibus ageretur
Meanwhile Eurylochus, not knowing what was going on in the house,
ad ostium sedebat;
was sitting at the gate;
postquam tamen ad solis occasum anxio animo et sollicito expectavit,
however, after he waited for sunset with an anxious and troubled spirit,
solus ad navem regredi constituit.
he decided to return to the ship alone.
Eo cum venisset,
When he got there,
sollicitudine ac timore tam perturbatus fuit
he was so greatly disturbed by worry and fear
ut quae vidisset vix dilucide narrare posset.
that he could hardly relate what he had seen lucidly.
Ulixes autem satis intellexit socios suos in periculo versari,
Ulysses, however, understood well enough that his companions were in danger,
et gladio correpto
and a sword having been seized
Eurylocho imperavit ut sine mora viam ad istam domum demonstraret.
he ordered Eurylochus to show (him) the way to that house without delay.
Ille tamen multis cum lacrimis Ulixem complexus obsecrare coepit
He, however, hugging Ulysses, began to beg him with many tears
ne in tantum periculum se committeret;
not to put himself in such great danger;
si quid gravius ei accidisset,
if something more serious happened to him,
omnium salutem in summo discrimine futuram.
the safety of all would be in the greatest risk.
Ulixes autem respondit se neminem invitum secum adducturum;
Ulysses, however, replied that he was not going to take with him anyone unwillingly;
ei licere, si mallet, in navi manere;
it was allowed that he remain in the ship, if he preferred;
se ipsum sine ullo praesidio rem suscepturum.
he would carry out the matter himself without any protection.
Hoc cum magna voce dixisset,
When he had sed this with a loud voice,
e navi desiluit et nullo sequente solus in viam se dedit.
he jumped out of the ship and, nobody following him, he put himself on the way alone.
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Fri Jun 29, 2018 6:53 pm

Here's a literal translation of all phrases in chapter 97, The Countercharm, in the style of Angela Thomas.

First, Angela's obligatory warning:
Note: This section is not translated into idiomatic English but is intended, together with the notes, to give you the gist of the meaning; you can then come up with your own improved translation. Sentences marked with * need particular attention to turn them into correct English.

Aliquantum itineris progressus
Having walked forth for some of the journey
ad villam magnificam pervenit,
he arrived at a splendid villa,
quam cum oculis perlustrasset,
which, when he examined it with his eyes,
statim intrare statuit;
he decided to enter immediately;
intellexit enim hanc esse eandem domum
as he understood this was the same house
de qua Eurylochus mentionem fecisset.
of which Eurylochus had made mention.*
At cum in eo esset ut limen intraret,
But when he was in such a place as to enter past the threshold,
subito ei obviam stetit adulescens format pulcherrima aureum baculum gerens.
suddenly a young woman, beautiful in appearance, stood facing him carrying a staff of gold.
Hic Ulixem iam domum intrantem manu corripuit et,
At this moment she grabbed Ulysses, as he entered into the house, with her hand and,
"Quo ruis?" inquit.
said "Where are you rushing to?
"Nonne scis hanc esse Circes domum?
Don't you know this is Circe's home?
Hic inclusi sunt amici tui ex humana specie in porcos conversi.
Here, enclosed inside, are your friends transformed out of human appearance into pigs.
Num vis ipse in eandem calamitatem venire?"
Do you want the same misfortune for yourself?"
Ulixes simul ac vocem audivit,
As soon as he heard her voice, Ulysses
deum Mercurium agnovit;
recognized the god Mercury;
nullis tamen precibus ab instituto consilio deterreri potuit.
(and) he (Ulysses) could not be frightened off his set plan by any requests.
Quod cum Mercurius sensisset,
When Mercury realized this,
herbam quandam ei dedit,
he gave him a certain kind of grass,
quam contra carmina multum valere dicebat.
which he said was very strong against (magical) songs.
"Hanc cape,"
"Take this,"
inquit,
he said,
"et ubi Circe te baculo tetigerit,
"and when Circe touches you with her staff,
tu stricto gladio impetum in eam vide ut facias."
you make sure that you make an attack into her with your drawn sword."
Mercurius postquam finem loquendi fecit,
Mercurius, after he made an end to his speaking,*
"Mortalis visus medio sermone reliquit,
he left the sight of the mortal in the middle of his speech,
et procul intenuem ex oculis evanuit auram."
and vanished from his eyes far off into a thin breeze."
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Fri Jun 29, 2018 7:13 pm

Here's a literal translation of all phrases in chapter 98, The Enchantress is Foiled, in the style of Angela Thomas.

First, Angela's obligatory warning:
Note: This section is not translated into idiomatic English but is intended, together with the notes, to give you the gist of the meaning; you can then come up with your own improved translation. Sentences marked with * need particular attention to turn them into correct English.

Brevi intermisso spatio
A short span having elapsed,*
Ulixes ad omnia pericula subeunda paratus
Ulysses, ready to undergo all and any danger,
ianuam pulsavit,
knocked on the door,
et foribus patefactis
and the doors having been opened
ab ipsa Circe benigne exceptus est.
he was welcomed kindly by Circe herself.
Omnia eodem modo atque antea facta sunt.
Everything was made in the same way as before.
Cenam magnifice instructam vidit
He saw a dinner splendidly equipped
et accumbere iussus est.
and he was ordered to lie at the dinner.
Mox, ubi fames cibo depulsa est,
Soon, when hunger was diverted with the food,*
Circe poculum aureum vino repletum Ulixi dedit.
Circe gave Ulysses a cup of gold full of wine.
Ille etsi suspicatus est venenum sibi paratum esse,
He, even though he suspected poison had been prepared for him,
poculum exhausit;
he drank the cup up;
quo facto Circe postquam caput eius baculo tetigit,
this having been done, Circe, after she touched him with her staff,
ea verba locuta est quibus socios eius antea in porcos converterat.
she spoke the words with which she had transformed his companions into pigs before.
Res tamen omnino aliter evenit atque illa speraverat.
The matter, however, turned out completely different than what she expected.
Tanta enim vis erat eius herbae quam Ulixi Mercurius dederat
So great was the strength of the grass that Mercury had given to Ulysses
ut neque venenum neque verba quicquam efficere possent.
that neither the poison nor the words had an effect on him to any extent.
Ulixes autem, ut ei praeceptum erat,
Ulysses, however, just as he had been ordered,
gladio stricto impetum in eam fecit
a sword having been grabbed made an attack into her
et mortem minitabatur.
and threatened (her) with death.
Circe cum artem suam nihil valere sensisset,
Circe, when she realized that her (magical) art was not strong at all (against him)
multis cum lacrimis eum obsecrare coepit ne sibi vitam adimeret.
with many tears started to beg him not to take her life.
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Fri Jun 29, 2018 7:31 pm

Here's a literal translation of all phrases in chapter 99, Men Once More, in the style of Angela Thomas.

First, Angela's obligatory warning:
Note: This section is not translated into idiomatic English but is intended, together with the notes, to give you the gist of the meaning; you can then come up with your own improved translation. Sentences marked with * need particular attention to turn them into correct English.

Ulixes autem ubi sensit eam timore perterritam esse,
Ulysses, however, when he realized she was terrified with fear,*
postulavit ut socios suos sine mora in humanam speciem reduceret
demanded that his companions be retransformed into human appearance without delay
(certior enim factus erat a deo Mercurio eos in porcos conversos esse);
(as he had been more certain by the god Mercury that they had been transformed into pigs);
nisi id factum esset,
unless this was done,
se debitas poenas sumpturum ostendit.
he showed he would deliver the due punishment.
Circe his rebus graviter commota
Circe, deeply shaken by these things,
ei ad pedes se proiecit,
threw herself at his feet,
et multis cum lacrimis iure iurando confirmavit
and with many tears assured him by sworn oath
se quae ille imperasset omnia facturam.
that she would do what he had ordered.
Tum porcos in atrium immitti iussit.
Then she ordered that the pigs be sent inside the reception room.
Illi dato signo irruerunt,
The signal having been given, they rushed inside
et cum ducem suum agnovissent,
and when they recognized their leader,
magno dolore affecti sunt
they were afflicted by great pain
quod nullo modo eum de rebus suis certiorem facere poterant.
because they could not in any way inform him about their things (what happened to them).
Circe tamen unguento quodam corpora eorum unxit;
Circe, however, rubbed their bodies with a certain unguent;
quo facto sunt omnes statim in humanam speciem reducti.
this having been done, all were transformed back immediately into human appearance.
Magno cum gaudio Ulixes suos amicos agnovit,
Ulysses recognized his friends with great joy,
et nuntium ad litus misit,
and sent a message to the shore,
qui reliquis Graecis socios receptos esse diceret.
which said to the Greeks left behind that their companions had been taken back.
Illi autem his rebus cognitis statim ad domum Circaeam se contulerunt;
They, however, these things having been known, went instantly to the Circean house;
quo cum venissent, universi laetitiae se dederunt.
when they got there, they all gave themselves to joy.
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Fri Jun 29, 2018 7:55 pm

Here's a literal translation of all phrases in chapter 100, Afloat Again, in the style of Angela Thomas.

First, Angela's obligatory warning:
Note: This section is not translated into idiomatic English but is intended, together with the notes, to give you the gist of the meaning; you can then come up with your own improved translation. Sentences marked with * need particular attention to turn them into correct English.

Postridie eius diei
On the next day of that day*
Ulixes ex hac insula quam celerrime discedere in animo habebat.
Ulysses had in his spirit to depart from the island as soon as possible.
Circe tamen cum haec cognovisset,
Circe, however, when she knew of this,
ex odio ad amorem conversa
having been transformed from hatred to love
omnibus precibus eum orare et obtestari coepi
began to beg and implore with all requests
ut paucos dies apud se moraretur;
so that he would stay at her place for a few days;
qua re tandem impetrata,
having gotten this thing (her request) in the end,*
tanta beneficia in eum contulit
she brought him such great services
ut facile ei persuasum sit ut diutius maneret.
that he was easily persuaded to stay for longer.
Postquam tamen totum annum apud Circen consumpserat,
However, after he spent a whole year at Circe's place,
Ulixes magno desiderio patriae suae motus est.
Ulysses was affected by a great longing for his native land.
Sociis igitur ad se convocatis
His companions, therefore, having been called together,
quid in animo haberet ostendit.
he showed (them) what he had in mind.
Ubi tamen ad litus descendit,
When, however, he went down to the shore,
navem suam tempestatibus tam afflictam invenit
he found his ship so affected by storms
ut ad navigandum paene inutilis esset.
that it was almost useless for navigating.
Hac re cognita
This thing having been known*
omnia quae ad naves reficiendas usui essent comparari iussit,
he ordered that everything that was of use to rebuild ships be prepared,
qua in re tantam diligentiam omnes adhibebant
(and) everyone employed such great earnestness in this
ut ante tertium diem opus perfecerint.
that they finished the job before the third day.
At Circe ubi omnia ad profectionem parata esse vidit,
But Circe, when she saw that everything was ready to set sail,
rem aegre ferebat
she took the matter badly
et Ulixem vehementer obsecrabat ut eo consilio desisteret.
and begged Ulysses grievously to abandon the plan.
Ille tamen, ne anni tempore a navigatione excluderetur,
He, however, so that he would not be prevented from navigating for the duration of a year,
maturandum sibi existimavit,
he thought he had to hurry up,
et tempestatem idoneam nactus navem solvit.
and having gotten ideal weather he freed the ship (he set sail).
Multa quidem pericula Ulixi subeunda erant
Many dangers were indeed for Ulysses to undergo (still)
antequam in patriam suam perveniret,
before he would arrive in his native land,
quae tamen hoc loco longum est perscribere.
but to finish writing in this place these things is long.*
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Fri Jun 29, 2018 7:56 pm

There. Done.

By the way, I tried using Geoffrey Steadman's commentary for the Fabulae Faciles, but I would recommend against using it. The translations he gives for individual words are often the ones you don't need, and some of his grammatical interpretations are wrong.
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby pin130 » Sun Jul 01, 2018 3:10 am

Thank you very much Ser! I've just reached chapter 87 and have begun using your translation to check my own. I hope soon to finish Ritchie's and was wondering what to read next. What did you read at a comparable point in development? Any suggestions on how to get from where I am now to where you are (I see from your other post that you're reading Ovid--something outside my present abilities). After Ritchie's many recommend
Caesar's De Bello Gallico. I have tried it before unsuccessfully, but now after Ritchie's, maybe I've moved up a notch? Steadman has a similar PDF on Caesar, but after your comments I'm wondering whether to use it.
Thanks again for your time and effort.
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Shenoute » Sun Jul 01, 2018 9:11 am

pin130 wrote:(...) I hope soon to finish Ritchie's and was wondering what to read next. (...)

Hi pin130,
I'm not Ser but at this point it might be worthwhile to reread Ritchie (maybe even several times). It is something I didn't do for a long time and I now find it rather helpful. Struggling (or even not struggling) once through a text is not enough to internalize the material, rereading is what makes it really stick. I have since seen it recommended by several different people so there must be something to be said for it!

Ser,
I glanced through some of the translations and I noticed that you often translate the pluperfect as a simple past (quod cum fecisset > "when he did this"). Is there a reason for this?
I am also unsure if id quod ei erat saluti should be translated by "as it was a refuge him".
Anyway, thanks for doing this, it will no doubt prove very useful to a lot of people (maybe it should be put as a pdf on the site to be more accessible).
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby pin130 » Sun Jul 01, 2018 2:12 pm

Thanks Shenoute for your advice. I know I should do Ritchies again, but the temptation is always to do new things...
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Shenoute » Sun Jul 01, 2018 5:38 pm

I understand :D
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Sun Jul 08, 2018 3:26 pm

pin130 wrote:Thank you very much Ser! I've just reached chapter 87 and have begun using your translation to check my own. I hope soon to finish Ritchie's and was wondering what to read next. What did you read at a comparable point in development? Any suggestions on how to get from where I am now to where you are (I see from your other post that you're reading Ovid--something outside my present abilities).

For someone who's finished Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles, I think I'd recommend reading the Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata series (Familia Romana, Colloquia Personarum, Fabula Syrae, Roma Aeterna). The Latinity there is excellent and graded. There is also Intensive Intermediate Latin: A Grammar and Workbook (2015) published by Routledge, which uses excerpts from the Aeneid somewhat adapted into prose (while maintaining the poetic vocabulary).
After Ritchie's many recommend Caesar's De Bello Gallico.

By the way, other real ancient authors people recommend to start with are Eutropius (technically a Late Latin historian), Curtius Rufus, Cornelius Nepos, and Cato the Elder. Try them out if the topic of De Bello Gallico bores you (Cato's On Agriculture is not exactly the most interesting reading admittedly, but his language at least is very simple).
I have tried it before unsuccessfully, but now after Ritchie's, maybe I've moved up a notch?

Yeah, possibly enough to read the above texts, but of course these texts are a notch more complicated. To give you a taste, Curtius Rufus' surviving text starts with:

Inter haec Alexander, ad conducendum ex Peloponneso militem, Cleandro cum pecunia misso, Lyciae Pamphyliaeque rebus compositis, ad urbem Celaenas exercitum admovit. Media illa tempestate, moenia interfluebat Marsyas amnis, fabulosis Graecorum carminibus inclitus.

The text starts with not one but two ablative absolutives (Cleandro...misso, rebus compositis), and then the next sentence has its main components in an interesting order: object (moenia), verb (interfluebat), subject (Marsyas amnis).
Shenoute wrote:Ser,
I glanced through some of the translations and I noticed that you often translate the pluperfect as a simple past (quod cum fecisset > "when he did this"). Is there a reason for this?

Just plain oversight. It so happens that that's how I speak English ("when he had done this" sounds a bit awkward to me? I'm not a native speaker admittedly). Unfortunately, I cannot edit my posts.
I am also unsure if id quod ei erat saluti should be translated by "as it was a refuge him".

Oh, I forgot the preposition "for" there: "as it was a refuge for him". Or is it because this is not the right translation of salus here? What would be better?
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby pin130 » Mon Jul 09, 2018 2:56 am

Thanks for the advice Ser. I'm now up to Chapter 95 in Ritchie's and using your translation with profit as you catch points I miss. This is the problem with Fabula Syrae and Roma Aeterna: There is no translation
available. (Familia Romana, which I've been through more than once, has a translation on Mr K's site)
The advantage of De Bello Gallico is that there are so many old school books for grammatical help and a
literal translation on this site. Even with all that, I expect tough going, and the subject matter, as you
mentioned, is not always so interesting.
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Shenoute » Mon Jul 09, 2018 5:53 pm

Ser wrote:
I am also unsure if id quod ei erat saluti should be translated by "as it was a refuge him".

Oh, I forgot the preposition "for" there: "as it was a refuge for him". Or is it because this is not the right translation of salus here? What would be better?
It seems to me that your translation makes "it" refer to the skin and that "refuge" is not what is meant here. As I understand it, "id" refers to the whole sentence, the fact that he had carried a skin with him, and "salus" is more "delivrance" than "refuge".
"He had carried a skin, a fact that was his delivrance,..."/"He had carried a skin and the fact that he had was what saved him".
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Tue Jul 10, 2018 6:17 pm

Oh, I see. Moreover, uter vini is a masculine noun, so it could not be referred to with id.
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Ser » Wed Jul 11, 2018 11:14 am

Bedwere's recommendation in the other thread of using the Latin Vulgate Bible is very good, by the way. I can't believe I didn't think of it, considering I myself read the Bible extensively when I was a beginner, even though I wasn't/am not Christian at all. The Latin of the Vulgate is very very simple (you don't really need a commentary, in my opinion!), and there's of course a lot of translations of the book into English. If you just want to read stories in easy Latin, the Bible is a good choice.
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby pin130 » Thu Jul 12, 2018 8:17 pm

Just finishing chapter 100 in Ritchie's. Thanks again for your translation Ser. I do have a Vulgate Genesis through Deuteromony, with grammatical notes, on my Kindle for PC. Problem is I'm from the old school that must have a physical book to enjoy. I've not seen this in book form (Vulgate only Genesis through Deuteronomy--which is what I'd be interested in reading--preferably with grammatical notes)
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Interaxus » Wed Aug 08, 2018 9:34 pm

Hi Ser,

I was glancing at one or two of your Ritchie translations and spotted this at the end of Chapter 91:

Graeci autem, etsi non multum afuit quin submergerentur,
The Greeks, however, even though it wasn't long since they had plunged (the ship into the sea)
nullo damno accepto
no damage having been received
cursum tenuerunt.
they held the course (of the ship).


This really means (as I'm sure you'll agree) something like:

The Greeks, however, although they had escaped by a hair's breadth from being sunk ('it was not lacking much but that they were/might be/ sunk), no damage having been received, held (their) course.

Otherwise I have nothing but admiration for your great effort on behalf of Ritchie fans (and Angela) .

Ut valeas!
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Re: A translation for the end of Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles

Postby Interaxus » Wed Aug 08, 2018 10:12 pm

Ser,

If it's any consolation, even 'illa Angela' could slip up sometimes. For example, I just came across this from her Chapter 82:

Navis autem qua ipse Ulixes vehebatur
The ship however in which Ulysses himself was being carried

vi tempestatis ad meridiem delata decimo die ad litus Libyae appulsa est.
carried off by the force of the storm, towards midday of the tenth day landed on the shore of Libya.


Here, of course, 'meridiem' means 'south', not 'noon'!

... carried away towards the south by the force of the storm ...

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