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Corrections: English Translations of Latin Hymns

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Corrections: English Translations of Latin Hymns

Postby Ursinus » Wed May 09, 2018 1:38 am

I am starting to create some literal translations for some of my favorite Latin hymns. The grammar usage and vocabulary can be a little strange at times, so I wanted to post them for correction. Keep in mind these are meant to be as literal as possible (or as is reasonable).

1. Veni, Creator Spiritus,
mentes tuorum visita,
imple superna gratia
quae tu creasti pectora.

2. Qui diceris Paraclitus,
altissimi donum Dei,
fons vivus, ignis, caritas,
et spiritalis unctio.

3. Tu, septiformis munere,
digitus paternae dexterae,
Tu rite promissum Patris,
sermone ditans guttura.

4. Accende lumen sensibus:
infunde amorem cordibus:
infirma nostri corporis
virtute firmans perpeti.

5. Hostem repellas longius,
pacemque dones protinus:
ductore sic te praevio
vitemus omne noxium.
6. Per te sciamus da Patrem,
noscamus atque Filium;
Teque utriusque Spiritum
credamus omni tempore.

7. Deo Patri sit gloria,
et Filio, qui a mortuis
surrexit, ac Paraclito,
in saeculorum saecula.

Come, Creator Spirit,
Visit the minds of your [people]
Fill with supernatural grace
The breasts which you have created.

You who are called the Paraclete.
Gift of the most high God,
Living font, fire, charity,
And spiritual unction.

You, sevenfold [with respect to] gift,
Finger of the right paternal [hand]
You solemnly promised of the Father,
Nourishing throats with speech.

Kindle a light to the senses:
Pour love into [our] hearts:
The weak parts of our body
Strengthening with unending strength.

Repel our enemies further [from us],
And give us peace forthwith.
By you the leader so leading the way
Let us avoid every harm.

Through you give [us] to know the Father,
Let us know also the Son;
And you the Spirit of both
Let us believe at all times.

Glory be to God the Father,
And to the Son, who from the dead
Rose, and to the Paraclete,
Into the ages of ages.

I have two questions aside from any other problems you guys might find.

(1) Paternae dexterae assumes manus, right? A more broad question about usage: can you just use the feminine adjective dextera and sinistra to talk about your right and left hand respectively?

(2) Infunda amorem cordibus. Does infunda take the acc. of what you are filling something with and dat. (or a preposition) of the object being filled?
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

Διορθοῦ με εἰ πλανῶμαι, παρακαλῶ.

Gratia et Pax,

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Re: Corrections: English Translations of Latin Hymns

Postby Barry Hofstetter » Wed May 09, 2018 2:44 am

Ursinus wrote:(1) Paternae dexterae assumes manus, right? A more broad question about usage: can you just use the feminine adjective dextera and sinistra to talk about your right and left hand respectively?


Yes, quite common actually.

(2) Infunda amorem cordibus. Does infunda take the acc. of what you are filling something with and dat. (or a preposition) of the object being filled?


Well, yes, a variety of the dative of indirect object.

in-fundo, fūdi, fūsum, 3, v. a., to pour in, upon, or into (syn. invergere). I. Lit.: aliquid in aliquod vas, Cic. Tusc. 1, 25, 61: vinum reticulo aut cribro, Sen. Ben. 7, 19: aliquid in nares, Plin. 20, 17, 69, § 180: sine riguis mare in salinas infundentibus, id. 31, 7, 39, § 81: rex Mithridates Aquilio duci capto aurum in os infudit, id. 33, 3, 14, § 48: animas formatae terrae, Ov. M. 1, 364; Plin. 3, 1, 1, § 5: sibi resinam et nardum, to anoint one’s self with, Auct. B. H. 33; Plin. 10, 46, 63, § 129.—B. Transf. 1. Infundere alicui aliquid, to pour out for, to administer to, present to, lay before: alicui venenum, Cic. Phil. 11, 6, 13: alicui poculum, Hor. Epod. 5, 77: jumentis hordea, Juv. 8, 154: (Neroni) totam tremuli frontem pulli, id. 6, 616.—

Lewis, C. T., & Short, C. (1891). Harpers’ Latin Dictionary (p. 949). New York; Oxford: Harper & Brothers; Clarendon Press.
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
The Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
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