Textkit Logo

another suus/eius question

Here you can discuss all things Latin. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get help with a difficult passage of Latin, and more.

another suus/eius question

Postby spqr » Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:34 pm

1. Postquam Troja a Graecis vastata est,Aeneas, dux Trojanus, cum sociis suis ad Thraciam navigavit.

2. His verbis moti, Aeneas et sociis eius a litoribus Thraciae fugerunt.


in both sentences the companions of Aeneas are referred to , one reflexively and not the other. I fail to see the difference.
spqr
Textkit Member
 
Posts: 162
Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2011 6:13 pm
Location: Hemet, CA, USA

Re: another suus/eius question

Postby bedwere » Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:01 pm

While in the first sentence Aeneas is clearly the subject, in the second he shares the limelight with his buddies. So in the first sentence you have suus because it referes to the subject. In the second you have ejus. You could have

Aeneas et socii eius a litoribus Thraciae fugerunt navi sua.

They fled with their (of Aeneas and his buddies, not only of Aeneas) ship.
User avatar
bedwere
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 3231
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2008 10:23 pm
Location: Didacopoli in California

Re: another suus/eius question

Postby Barry Hofstetter » Fri Feb 09, 2018 11:55 pm

In the second sentence, sociis should be socii. So you are trying to say sui used in the second sentence would refer to the compound subject, and so eius is used to make the distinction? That sounds right.
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
The Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
καὶ σὺ τὸ σὸν ποιήσεις κἀγὼ τὸ ἐμόν. ἆρον τὸ σὸν καὶ ὕπαγε.
Barry Hofstetter
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 548
Joined: Thu Aug 15, 2013 12:22 pm

Re: another suus/eius question

Postby bedwere » Sat Feb 10, 2018 12:08 am

Ah, yes. It must be socii. I agree also with the rest.
User avatar
bedwere
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 3231
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2008 10:23 pm
Location: Didacopoli in California

Re: another suus/eius question

Postby spqr » Sat Feb 10, 2018 11:03 pm

Yes, I should have typed in socii instead of sociis.Thank you for the responses. It's all clear now. The two forms of the possessive is an important distinction in Latin which is lacking in English. My wife is from South America and I will ask her if modern Spanish follows the Latin in this respect.
spqr
Textkit Member
 
Posts: 162
Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2011 6:13 pm
Location: Hemet, CA, USA


Return to Learning Latin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: pin130 and 125 guests