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Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Thu Aug 25, 2016 2:06 pm

OK



Illi mercatores habent tabernas in viis Romae qui proclamant de mercibus suis ambulantes qui ement merces.

The merchants have tents in the streets of Rome who of their merchandise proclaim to those walking who buy merchandise.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby bedwere » Thu Aug 25, 2016 2:50 pm

Matthew Gendzwill wrote:OK



Illi mercatores habent tabernas in viis Romae qui proclamant de mercibus suis ambulantes qui ement merces.

The merchants have tents in the streets of Rome who of their merchandise proclaim to those walking who buy merchandise.

Frankly, the English is not much clearer than the Latin, but I guess I understand.
You should use punctuation marks in English as well as in Latin. What you wrote in English could have been rendered as:

Mercatores, qui habent tabernas in viis Romae, de mercibus suis praedicant ambulantibus, qui emunt merces.

Illi mercatores would mean those (famous) merchants.
praedico here is better than proclamo. In any case,you could put merces in the accusative (instead of de mercibus), but definitely not ambulantes. The sellers are advertising their products (or about their products), not their costumers.
ement wrong tense

Carry on.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Thu Aug 25, 2016 3:32 pm

OK



Illi mercatores habent tabernas in viis Romae qui proclamant de mercibus suis ambulantes qui ement merces.

The merchants have tents in the streets of Rome who of their merchandise proclaim to those walking who buy merchandise.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Thu Aug 25, 2016 3:35 pm

Please disregard the second paste. I did not accurately visualize that my reply to your request had been posted.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Thu Aug 25, 2016 3:40 pm

Caution. Patience.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Fri Aug 26, 2016 5:24 am

Capitulo doudecim

Membra corporis humani sunt duo bracchia et duo crura. In corpore humano unum caput est, non duo capites. In capite sunt duae aures et unum os. In ore sunt dentes. In pectore unum cor et duo pulmones sunt.
Medicus Quintum super lectum iacere videt. Medicus: "Quintus dormit." Medicus: 'Quintum dormire' dicit. Medicus puerum linguam ostendere iubet, et 'linguam eius rubram esse' dicit. Puer dicit 'pedes et caput dolent.' Medicus Aemiliam poculum tenere iubet. Syra Quintum spirare non audit, itaque Syra eum mortuum esse putat. Sed Quintus vivet. Mater filium vivere gaudet. Necesse est puerum aegrotum dormire.
Corpus humanum habet quattuor membra: duo bracchia et duo crura. Super collum est caput. In capite sunt duo oculi, duae aures, unus nasus, unum os. In ore sunt dentes et lingua. Sub collo est pectus. In pectore sunt pulmones et cor. In corde et in venis sanguis est. Sanquis per venas ad cor fluit.
Aemilia apud lectum Quinti sedet, Syra apud lectum stat. Quintus non sanus sed aeger est. Syrus medicum ex oppido arcessit. Medicus digitum ad pedem pueri tangere: medicus pedem eius tangit. Quintus, qui digitum medici in pede sentit: "Ei pes meus!"
Quae sunt membra corporis humani? Which are members of the human body?
Crura bracchiaque membra sunt corporis. The legs and arms members are of the body.
Ubi est cerebrum? Where is cerebrum? Post frontem id est. After the brow it is.
Quid agunt mercatores? What do they do the merchants? Vendent ambulantibus merces. They sell to those walking "merchandise".
Num necesse est margaritas habere? Not necessary is it pearls to have? Quia homines non posse comedere eas , cibos necesse est. Because men not to eat them are able, food necessary is.
Quid est oceanus Atlanticus? Which is ocean Atlanticus? Inter Americam et Europam Atlanticus est. Between America and Europe the Atlantic is.
Cur aquila a parvis avibus timetur? Why eagle of the small birds is feared?
Aves parvi ab aquila corrupitur. Small birds by eagle are burst.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby bedwere » Fri Aug 26, 2016 7:05 am

Matthew Gendzwill wrote:Capitulo doudecim

Membra corporis humani sunt duo bracchia et duo crura. In corpore humano unum caput est, non duo capites. In capite sunt duae aures et unum os. In ore sunt dentes. In pectore unum cor et duo pulmones sunt.
Medicus Quintum super lectum iacere videt. Medicus: "Quintus dormit." Medicus: 'Quintum dormire' dicit. Medicus puerum linguam ostendere iubet, et 'linguam eius rubram esse' dicit. Puer dicit 'pedes et caput dolent.' Medicus Aemiliam poculum tenere iubet. Syra Quintum spirare non audit, itaque Syra eum mortuum esse putat. Sed Quintus vivet. Mater filium vivere gaudet. Necesse est puerum aegrotum dormire.
Corpus humanum habet quattuor membra: duo bracchia et duo crura. Super collum est caput. In capite sunt duo oculi, duae aures, unus nasus, unum os. In ore sunt dentes et lingua. Sub collo est pectus. In pectore sunt pulmones et cor. In corde et in venis sanguis est. Sanquis per venas ad cor fluit.
Aemilia apud lectum Quinti sedet, Syra apud lectum stat. Quintus non sanus sed aeger est. Syrus medicum ex oppido arcessit. Medicus digitum ad pedem pueri tangere: medicus pedem eius tangit. Quintus, qui digitum medici in pede sentit: "Ei pes meus!"
Quae sunt membra corporis humani? Which are members of the human body?
Crura bracchiaque membra sunt corporis. The legs and arms members are of the body.
Ubi est cerebrum? Where is cerebrum? Post frontem id est. After the brow it is.
Quid agunt mercatores? What do they do the merchants? Vendent ambulantibus merces. They sell to those walking "merchandise".
Num necesse est margaritas habere? Not necessary is it pearls to have? Quia homines non posse comedere eas , cibos necesse est. Because men not to eat them are able, food necessary is.
Quid est oceanus Atlanticus? Which is ocean Atlanticus? Inter Americam et Europam Atlanticus est. Between America and Europe the Atlantic is.
Cur aquila a parvis avibus timetur? Why eagle of the small birds is feared?
Aves parvi ab aquila corrupitur. Small birds by eagle are burst.


Are you trying to imitate Yoda? :D Seriously, there are several errors in your translations, but you should first rewrite them in standard English.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Timothée » Fri Aug 26, 2016 7:52 am

To add to Bedwere:
Matthew Gendzwill wrote:Capitulo doudecim as mentioned earlier, you should use ordinal numbers; besides, caput might do instead of capitulum, though lectio may be even better

Membra corporis humani sunt duo bracchia et duo crura. In corpore humano unum caput est, non duo capites. In capite sunt duae aures et unum os. In ore sunt dentes. In pectore unum cor et duo pulmones sunt.
Medicus Quintum super lectum iacere videt. Medicus: "Quintus dormit." As Latin didn't have inverted commas, you may want to rephrase this slightly; and remember that there's also the very commonly used word inquit Medicus: 'Quintum dormire' as this is oratio obliqua, no need for inverted commas dicit. Medicus puerum linguam ostendere iubet, et 'linguam eius rubram esse' dicit. Puer dicit 'pedes et caput dolent.' Medicus Aemiliam poculum tenere iubet. Syra Quintum spirare non audit, itaque Syra eum mortuum esse putat. Sed Quintus vivet. Mater filium vivere gaudet. Necesse est puerum aegrotum dormire.
Corpus humanum habet quattuor membra: duo bracchia et duo crura. Super collum est caput. In capite sunt duo oculi, duae aures, unus nasus, unum os. In ore sunt dentes et lingua. Sub collo est pectus. In pectore sunt pulmones et cor. In corde et in venis sanguis est. Sanquis per venas ad cor fluit.
Aemilia apud lectum Quinti sedet, Syra apud lectum autem might do instead so that you needn't repeat this stat. Quintus non sanus sed aeger est. Syrus medicum ex oppido arcessit. Medicus digitum ad pedem if this means 'toe', digitus pedis is better (and if it's obvious from the context, pedis may be dropped altogether) pueri tangere: medicus pedem eius tangit. Quintus, qui digitum medici in pede sentit: "Ei pes meus!"
Quae sunt membra corporis humani? Which are members of the human body?
Crura bracchiaque membra sunt corporis. The legs and arms members are of the body.
Ubi est cerebrum? Where is cerebrum? Isn't this quite a technical term in English? Why not simply 'brain'? Post frontem id est. After the brow it is.
Quid agunt mercatores? What do they do the merchants? Is this how Englishmen are taught to parse/analyse the sentences? They is obviously excessive. Vendent ambulantibus merces. They sell to those walking "merchandise".
Num necesse est margaritas habere? Not necessary is it pearls to have? Quia homines non posse comedere eas, cibos necesse est. Because men not to eat them are able, food necessary is.
Quid revise the interrogatives est oceanus Atlanticus? Which is ocean Atlanticus? Inter Americam et Europam Atlanticus est something else is better here, e.g. iacet or situm est. Between America and Europe the Atlantic is.
Cur aquila a parvis avibus timetur? Why eagle of the small birds is feared?
Aves parvi ab aquila corrupitur. I don't know which verb you're after (corrumpere? corripere?), but it's wrong all the same. (I.e., what's the subject?) Small birds by eagle are burst.


As Bedwere says, write proper English.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Fri Aug 26, 2016 4:28 pm

Capitulo doudecim as mentioned earlier, you should use ordinal numbers; besides, caput might do instead of capitulum, though lectio may be even better

A) Yes. Duodecimum. It's right there on the page header. I even have a list of the Ordinals v.s. Cardinals on my table here. Every little bit helps.

Medicus: "Quintus dormit." As Latin didn't have inverted commas, you may want to rephrase this slightly; and remember that there's also the very commonly used word inquit Medicus: 'Quintum dormire' as this is oratio obliqua, no need for inverted commas dicit.



A) oratio obliqua Thank you. I wanted to know how to refer to this kind of phrase.

A) vivet HHooah...o,is,it,imus,itis, unt :?

Syra apud lectum autem might do instead so that you needn't repeat this stat.

A) Syra apud lectum autem...also has very nice meter.


Medicus digitum ad pedem if this means 'toe', digitus pedis is better (and if it's obvious from the context, pedis may be dropped altogether)

A) I think it means 'finger' and the exercise is for the infinitive with the accusative...?

cerebrum? Isn't this quite a technical term in English? Why not simply 'brain'?

A) Yes...UHUUH! I think too hard, eh? There ain't no better way to get something if I don't just relax a little.

What do they do the merchants? Is this how Englishmen are taught to parse/analyse the sentences? They is obviously excessive.

A) Yoda I am not nor strive to be shall I in future.

Inter Americam et Europam Atlanticus est something else is better here, e.g. iacet or situm est.

A) Thank you. My reading of definitions found in L.S., Tufts, is improving so that I am developing intuition as a result of these exercises and comments, which intuition is a work beneath a pen.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Timothée » Fri Aug 26, 2016 5:27 pm

Matthew Gendzwill wrote:Syra apud lectum autem might do instead so that you needn't repeat this stat.

Sorry, I wasn't totally clear. I tried to suggest the formulation Aemilia apud lectum Quinti sedet, Syra autem stat. The reason for my suggestion is merely to get rid of repetition, which can seem infelicitous.

Matthew Gendzwill wrote:Medicus digitum ad pedem pueri tangere

I thought this was meant to mean 'The doctor touches the boy's toe'. Do you want to say 'The doctor touches the boy's foot with his finger'? If that's the case you could say Medicus pedem pueri digito tangit.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Sat Aug 27, 2016 3:38 am

Medicus digitum ad pedem pueri tangere

Q) I thought this was meant to mean 'The doctor touches the boy's toe'. Do you want to say 'The doctor touches the boy's foot with his finger'? If that's the case you could say Medicus pedem pueri digito tangit.

A) I entered text from page 84 as Medicus digitum ad pedem pueri tangere to comply with the exercise for the infinitive with the accusative. Medicus pedem pueri digito tangit occurs to me more readily, as you suggest.

Thank you. I will begin to post another set. Already my reading of the Vulgate and Classical exerpts from L.S. Tufts has improved greatly.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Sat Aug 27, 2016 4:26 am

WOW!!!
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Timothée » Sat Aug 27, 2016 5:02 am

You cannot use acc. c. inf. like that. Remember that for acc. c. inf. you need something on which it's dependent, e.g.

Vidi medicum pedem pueri tangere. (I saw the doctor touch the boy's foot.)
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Sun Aug 28, 2016 11:54 pm

May not then the acc. c. inf. be used in any kind of dependent clause?
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Mon Aug 29, 2016 12:03 am

In the sentence in which I erred in it use, I wanted to say: The doctor touched the boy's foot with his finger. What I wanted to say was only conveyed in the use of the ablative with the third person singular. Medicus pedem pueri digito tangit. Medicus pedem tangit. Quomodo pedem Medicus tangit? Digito tangit. But the subject nominative is not in view of another person....and therefore You cannot use acc. c. inf. like that. Remember that for acc. c. inf. you need something on which it's dependent...?
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Tue Aug 30, 2016 4:18 am

Pilum e manu iacitur, sagitta ex arcu. In excercitibus Romanis multi Galli militant, qui arcum ferunt. Equitates sine metu in hostes facit, neque hostes impetum equitatus (equituum?) sustinere possunt. Mille passus sunt quinque milia pedum. Via Latina CL [150: centum quinquaginta] milia passus longus est.
Ramus tenuis puerum crassum sustinere non potest, nam puer crassus gravis est. Unum malum grave non est, nec duo mala gravia sunt, sed saccus plenus malorum gravis est. Leander saccum magnus et gravis portat. In sacco gravi sunt mala. Servi saccos graves portant. In saccis gravibus sunt mala et pira.
Saccus Leandri gravior est quam Syri, nam mala graviora sunt quam pira. Via Appia longa est quam via Latina. Via Appia et via Aurelia longae sunt quam via Latina. Quintus crassus est quam Marcus. Leander saccus gravis quam Syrus portat. In sacco gravi mala sunt.
Hoc pilum longum et grave est quam illud. Haec pila longa et gravia sunt quam illa.
Marcus frater Quinti est. Quintus unum fratrem et unam sororem habet. 'Julia' nomen sororis est. Frater Aemiliae est avunculus liberorum. Quintus: "Ubi est avunculus noster?" Julius: Avunculus vester
est in Germania."
Provincia est finis imperii Romani. Rhenus Germaniam ab imperio Romano dividit. Rhenus finis imperii est. In Germania multi milites Romani sunt, qui contra Germanos pugnant. Germani enim hostes Romanorum sunt. Milites Romani scuta et gladii et pila habent. Milites in castra habitant. Circum castra est fossa et vallum quod decem pedes altus est. Milites patriam ab hostibus defendunt
Num Marcus cognomen est? Praenomen Marcus est.
Quot fratres habet Aemilia? Aemiliae frater unum est.
Quid agit Aemilius in Germania? Iacit pilum in hostes.
Quae arma pedes Romanus fert? Ferunt gladios, pila et scuta
Quam longum est pilum Aemilii? Pilum ejus non tam longum quam hasta equitis. Sex pedes longum est pilum Aemilii.
Ubi habitant milites Romani? In patriam Germanorum habitant illi, aedificantes castra et abuentes ex portis illorum in hostes pugnant. I THINK: In the German homeland they inhabit who build camps and go out of their gates to fight the enemy.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Timothée » Tue Aug 30, 2016 7:40 am

A few remarks that caught my eye. Remember to watch carefully every single word when you write. Easier said than done, I know.
Matthew Gendzwill wrote:Pilum e manu iacitur, sagitta ex arcu. In excercitibus Romanis multi Galli militant, qui arcum ferunt. Equitates sine metu in hostes facit, neque hostes impetum equitatus (equituum?) sustinere possunt. Mille passus sunt quinque milia pedum. Via Latina CL [150: centum quinquaginta] milia passus (mille is adjective, but its plural milia is substantive and needs genitive) longus est.
Ramus tenuis puerum crassum sustinere non potest, nam puer crassus gravis est. Unum malum grave non est, nec duo mala gravia sunt, sed saccus plenus malorum gravis est. Leander saccum magnus et gravis portat. In sacco gravi sunt mala. Servi saccos graves portant. In saccis gravibus sunt mala et pira.
Saccus Leandri gravior est quam Syri, nam mala graviora sunt quam pira. Via Appia longa est quam via Latina. Via Appia et via Aurelia longae sunt quam via Latina. Quintus crassus est quam Marcus. Leander saccus gravis quam Syrus portat. In sacco gravi mala sunt.
Hoc pilum longum et grave est quam illud. Haec pila longa et gravia sunt quam illa.
Marcus frater Quinti est. Quintus unum fratrem et unam sororem habet. 'Julia' nomen sororis est. Frater Aemiliae est avunculus liberorum. Quintus: "Ubi est avunculus noster?" (Like last time, you can't write oratio recta like this. Remember that the embedded inquit is really common.) Julius: Avunculus vester est in Germania." (ditto)
Provincia est finis imperii Romani. Rhenus Germaniam ab imperio Romano dividit. Rhenus finis imperii est. In Germania multi milites Romani sunt, qui contra Germanos pugnant. Germani enim hostes Romanorum sunt. Milites Romani scuta et gladii et pila habent. Milites in castra habitant. Circum castra est fossa et vallum quod decem pedes altus est. Milites patriam ab hostibus defendunt
Num Marcus cognomen est? Praenomen Marcus est.
Quot fratres habet Aemilia? Aemiliae (good! one does not want to overuse habere) frater unum est.
Quid agit Aemilius in Germania? Iacit pilum in hostes.
Quae arma pedes Romanus fert? Ferunt gladios, pila et scuta
Quam longum est pilum Aemilii? Pilum ejus (you should strongly consider discarding the letter j altogether when writing Latin) non tam longum quam hasta equitis. Sex pedes longum est pilum Aemilii.
Ubi habitant milites Romani? In patriam Germanorum habitant (and remember that habitare is also used transitively) illi, aedificantes castra et abuentes ex portis illorum in hostes pugnant. I THINK: In the German homeland they inhabit who build camps and go out of their gates to fight the enemy.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Tue Aug 30, 2016 11:56 pm

1) In excercitibus Romanis multi Galli militant, qui arcum ferunt.
A) exercitibus Exercitus, us an exercised, disciplined body of men, an army L.S., Tufts

2) Equitates sine metu in hostes facit,
A) Equites

3) milia passus (mille is adjective, but its plural milia is substantive and needs genitive) longus est.
A)Milia passuum
Pagina undenonagesima, versu nonagesima septem: "Unus passus est quinque pedes, ergo mille passus sunt quinque milia pedum. [pēs , pĕdis, L.S. Tufts], pedum genetivus pluralis est . One pace/step is five feet, therefore five thousand of feet are one thousand paces. :?:

4) Leander saccum magnus et gravis portat.
A) [saccus , i, m L.S. Tufts] magnum, gravem. Per temporem longum conatus sum ut adietivi subiectivique concurrant! :?

5) Leander saccus gravis quam Syrus portat.
A) I should just wait a day before posting anything. saccum gravem.

6) Hoc pilum longum et grave est quam illud. Haec pila longa et gravia sunt quam illa.
A) Comparativus [pīlum , i, n L.S. Tufts]
Hoc pilum longius et gravius est quam illud. Haec pila longiora et graviora sunt quam illa.

7) Quintus: "Ubi est avunculus noster?" (Like last time, you can't write oratio recta like this. Remember that the embedded inquit is really common.) Julius: Avunculus vester est in Germania." (ditto)
A) OK

8 Milites Romani scuta et gladii et pila habent.
A) [glădĭus , ĭi, m L.S. Tufts] :?:

9) Pilum ejus (you should strongly consider discarding the letter j altogether when writing Latin)
A) OK
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby bedwere » Fri Sep 02, 2016 4:10 pm

Matthew Gendzwill wrote:1) versu nonagesima septem:

Per temporem longum conatus sum ut adietivi subiectivique concurrant! :?

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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Fri Sep 09, 2016 12:55 am

Horae diei sunt duodecimus. Hora sexta diem divitit induas partes: ante meridiem et post meridiem. Sex horae sunt dimidia pars diei. Mensis Iunius triginta dies habet. Novus annus incipit ab eo die qui dicitur kalendae Ianurariae.
Iulius mensis anni calidissimus est; Ianuarius est mensis anni frigidissimus. Mensis anni brevissimus est Februarius. Padus est flumen Italiae longum et latum. Sol stella clarissimus est.
Ianurarius mensis primus est. December est mensis duodecimus ac postremus. Tempore antiquo September mensis septimus erat, nam tunc mensis primus erat Martius. Nunc September mensis decimus est. Dies est tempus a mane ad vesperum. Mane est inintium diei, vesper finis diei est et initium nocte. Dies in duodecim horas dividitur. Nocte luna et stellae lucent, neque eae tam clarae sunt quam sol. Sol lunam luce sua illustrat. Ea lunae pars quae sole non illustratur obscurus est.
Ver et hiems, aestas et autumnus sunt quattuor tempora anni. Aestas est tempus a mense Iunio ad
Augustum. Hieme non solum imber, sed etiam nix de nubibus cadit: montes et campi nive operiuntur. Aqua non tam multa est quam nix.
Quot sunt menses anni? Annus in duodecim menses dividitur.

A quo Ianuarius nomen habet? Ianuario a deo Iano nominatus est.

Quam longus est mensis Aprilis? Triginta dies Aprilis habet.

A quo mensis Iulius nomen habet? Nomine Iulio mesis Iulius nominatur.

Cur mensis decimus October nominatur? Priore tempore mensis primus Martius erat, menses septem, octavus, nonus, et decimus September, October, November et December nominati erant. Exinde tempore, Ianuarius Iano nominatur, nunc in loco primo sequentiae mensium posuit.

Cur luna non tam clara est quam sol? Luna non lucem suam habet nisi illa qua sole mittitur.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby bedwere » Fri Sep 09, 2016 11:04 pm

Matthew, try to fix the errors I spotted in your previous exercise.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Sat Sep 10, 2016 3:31 am

Yes

Q) versu nonagesima septem:
A) versus nonagintaseptem

Q) Per temporem longum conatus sum ut adietivi subiectivique concurrant!
A) tempus, temporis, 3rd declension, neuter in which the singular accusative duplicates the singular nominative,therefore: per tempus lognum conatus sum.....
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Fri Sep 16, 2016 3:49 pm

Per tempus longum conatus sum ut adietivi subiectivique concurrant.
When "adiectivi" and "subjectivi", nouns in the plural nominative, are put with a transitive verb, must there be an object? What I wanted to say: I took a long time to have agreement of subject and adjective.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby bedwere » Fri Sep 16, 2016 3:57 pm

Matthew Gendzwill wrote:Per tempus longum conatus sum ut adietivi subiectivique concurrant.
When "adiectivi" and "subjectivi", nouns in the plural nominative, are put with a transitive verb, must there be an object? What I wanted to say: I took a long time to have agreement of subject and adjective.


I guess you tried to translate adjective and subject into Latin. Although they derive from Latin, your translation is not correct. You may want to use this dictionary.

PS

Per longum tempus --> Longe (more elegant)
concurrant ---> Wrong. See example in Smith at the end of the voice "agree"
In general, it is too early for you to discuss grammar in Latin. You should start with something easier. I recommend you join the conversation about the weather in the Agora.
What's the weather today? (Latine)
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby bedwere » Fri Sep 16, 2016 5:06 pm

Matthew Gendzwill wrote:Horae diei sunt duodecimus. Hora sexta diem divitit induas partes: ante meridiem et post meridiem. Sex horae sunt dimidia pars diei. Mensis Iunius triginta dies habet. Novus annus incipit ab eo die qui dicitur kalendae Ianurariae.
Iulius mensis anni calidissimus est; Ianuarius est mensis anni frigidissimus. Mensis anni brevissimus est Februarius. Padus est flumen Italiae longum et latum. Sol stella clarissimus est.
Ianurarius mensis primus est. December est mensis duodecimus ac postremus. Tempore antiquo September mensis septimus erat, nam tunc mensis primus erat Martius. Nunc September mensis decimus est. Dies est tempus a mane ad vesperum. Mane est inintium diei, vesper finis diei est et initium nocte. Dies in duodecim horas dividitur. Nocte luna et stellae lucent, neque eae tam clarae sunt quam sol. Sol lunam luce sua illustrat. Ea lunae pars quae sole non illustratur obscurus est.
Ver et hiems, aestas et autumnus sunt quattuor tempora anni. Aestas est tempus a mense Iunio ad
Augustum. Hieme non solum imber, sed etiam nix de nubibus cadit: montes et campi nive operiuntur. Aqua non tam multa est quam nix.
Quot sunt menses anni? Annus in duodecim menses dividitur.

A quo Ianuarius nomen habet? Ianuario a deo Iano nominatus est.

Quam longus est mensis Aprilis? Triginta dies Aprilis habet.

A quo mensis Iulius nomen habet? Nomine Iulio mesis Iulius nominatur.

Cur mensis decimus October nominatur? Priore tempore mensis primus Martius erat, menses septem, octavus, nonus, et decimus September, October, November et December nominati erant. Exinde tempore, Ianuarius Iano nominatur, nunc in loco primo sequentiae mensium posuit.

Cur luna non tam clara est quam sol? Luna non lucem suam habet nisi illa qua sole mittitur.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Sun Sep 18, 2016 1:59 am

Q) Horae diei sunt duodecimus.
A) Horae diei sunt duodecim


Q) Hora sexta diem divitit induas partes: ante meridiem et post meridiem.
A) Hora sexta diei dividit in duas partes.


Q) Novus annus incipit ab eo die qui dicitur kalendae Ianurariae.
A) Novus annus incipit ab eo die qui dicitur kalendae Ianurariae


Q) Sol stella clarissimus est.
A) Sol stella clarissima est


Q) Ianurarius mensis primus est. and "Ianuarius" agrees with "mensis" in number and gender....?
A) (Mensis, is and Ianuarius, a um) [Lewis and Short, Tufts]
(Januario mense cura ut Romae sis) [Lewis and Short, Tufts]
Take care that you be in Rome in the month of January.



Q) Mane est inintium diei, vesper finis diei est et initium nocte.
A) Mane est initium diei, vesper finis diei est et initium noctis


Q) Ianuario a deo Iano nominatus est.
A) Ianuarius a deo Iano nominatus est.


Q) A quo mensis Iulius nomen habet?
A) A quo mense Julius nomen habet?


Q)
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby bedwere » Sun Sep 18, 2016 4:47 am

Matthew Gendzwill wrote:A) Hora sexta diei dividit in duas partes.



A) Novus annus incipit ab eo die qui dicitur kalendae Ianurariae


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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Sun Sep 18, 2016 6:29 pm

CAPITULUM TREDECIM

Q) Hora sexta diei dividit in duas partes.
A) Horae dividunt diem, hora sexta diem dividit in duas partes.

Q) Novus annus incipit ab eo die qui dicitur kalendae Ianurariae
A) ?? Pagina septemnonaginta: "....'kalendae Ianuariae'; is dies anni primus est atque initium anni novi."
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby bedwere » Sun Sep 18, 2016 7:51 pm

Matthew Gendzwill wrote:CAPITULUM TREDECIM

Q) Hora sexta diei dividit in duas partes.
A) Horae dividunt diem, hora sexta diem dividit in duas partes.

Q) Novus annus incipit ab eo die qui dicitur kalendae Ianurariae
A) ?? Pagina septemnonaginta: "....'kalendae Ianuariae'; is dies anni primus est atque initium anni novi."


nonaginta septem
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Sun Sep 18, 2016 10:30 pm

Holy smokes....how blind can I be??
nonaginta septem.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby bedwere » Mon Sep 19, 2016 3:20 am

Matthew Gendzwill wrote:Holy smokes....how blind can I be??
nonaginta septem.


You can also have septem et nonaginta (cfr. sieben und neunzig in German), but you need to insert et.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Mon Sep 19, 2016 12:57 pm

CAPITULUM QUATTUORDECIM

Puer dormiens nihil audit. Davus puerum dormientem excitat: in aurem pueri dormientis clamat: Marce! Marcus oculos apertit servum apud lectum stantem videt. Servus puero frigenti vestimenta dat. Parentes filium intrantem salutant et a filio intrante salutantur. Filius discedit, Vale inquit. Corpus valens non dolet. Medicus caput dolens sanare non potest. Pisces sunt animalia natantes.
Pueri in lectis cubant. Alter puer dormit, alter vigilat; alter valens, alter aegrotat. Uter puer aegrotat, Marcusne an Quintus? Quintus aegrotat.
Servus dormientem excitat et ei aquam dat. Marcus e lecto surgit et primum manus lavat, deinde faciem. Puer vestimenta a servo poscit, et primum tunicam induit, deinde togam. Iam puer nudus non est. Viro togato bracchium dextrum nudum est. Davus Marcum secum venire iubet: Veni Marce!
Marcus Medum, qui cum eo ire solet, non videt. Medus ire cum Marco solet. Medus libros et ceteras res Marci portare solet, Marcus ipse nullam portare solet praeter malum. Hodie, inquit Julius, Medus tecum ire non potest. Marcus solus abit librum et regulam et stilum et tabulam ferens.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby bedwere » Mon Sep 19, 2016 5:18 pm

Matthew Gendzwill wrote:CAPITULUM QUATTUORDECIM

Puer dormiens nihil audit. Davus puerum dormientem excitat: in aurem pueri dormientis clamat: Marce! Marcus oculos apertit servum apud lectum stantem videt. Servus puero frigenti vestimenta dat. Parentes filium intrantem salutant et a filio intrante salutantur. Filius discedit, Vale inquit. Corpus valens non dolet. Medicus caput dolens sanare non potest. Pisces sunt animalia natantes.
Pueri in lectis cubant. Alter puer dormit, alter vigilat; alter valens, alter aegrotat. Uter puer aegrotat, Marcusne an Quintus? Quintus aegrotat.
Servus dormientem excitat et ei aquam dat. Marcus e lecto surgit et primum manus lavat, deinde faciem. Puer vestimenta a servo poscit, et primum tunicam induit, deinde togam. Iam puer nudus non est. Viro togato bracchium dextrum nudum est. Davus Marcum secum venire iubet: Veni Marce!
Marcus Medum, qui cum eo ire solet, non videt. Medus ire cum Marco solet. Medus libros et ceteras res Marci portare solet, Marcus ipse nullam portare solet praeter malum. Hodie, inquit Julius, Medus tecum ire non potest. Marcus solus abit librum et regulam et stilum et tabulam ferens.

Errors in bold.
Moreover, if you use parataxis, you need to include a conjunction before servum apud lectum stantem videt
This is true also for Vale inquit
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Tue Sep 20, 2016 4:09 pm

CAPITULUM QUATTUORDECIM

Q) Marcus oculos apertit servum apud lectum stantem videt.
A) Marcus oculos aperiens et servum apud lectum stantem videt.


Q) Pisces sunt animalia natantes
A) Pisces sunt animalia natalitates


Q) Alter puer dormit, alter vigilat; alter valens, alter aegrotat.
A) Alter puer dormit, alter vigilat; alter valet, alter aegrotat.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby bedwere » Tue Sep 20, 2016 4:44 pm

Matthew Gendzwill wrote:
A) Marcus oculos aperiens et servum apud lectum stantem videt.


A) Pisces sunt animalia natalitates


Either you use hypotaxis (i.e., the participle) and don't use the conjunction or you use parataxis (i.e, the indicative) and you use the conjuction

natalitates is not Latin
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Wed Sep 21, 2016 1:38 am

Q) Marcus oculos aperiens et servum apud lectum stantem videt.
Either you use hypotaxis (i.e., the participle) and don't use the conjunction or you use parataxis (i.e, the indicative) and you use the conjuction.
aperire, aperio, aperui, apertum
A) Marcus oculos aperit, not apertit...which, according to L.S. does not occur as a Latin word. Hypotaxis seems to be a device used to convey images in poetry by means of following clauses or phrases with less significance than a main clause which they modify and which device does not involve the use of conjunctions and the absence of conjunctions in following clauses contributes to increasing possibility of these for the image of the main clause. But Marcus oculos aperit servum apud lectum stantem videt is too simple, too indicative (hypotaxis) for my over-thinking and complicated mind and the sentence is simply indicative and if only I had spelled "aperit" correctly I would have lost the opportunity to think about hypotaxis without conjunctions for clauses unequal to the main which contribute to the main versus parataxis with conjunctions for clauses contributing to the main following an indicative verb.

Q) Pisces sunt animalia natalitates
A) natatilis
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby bedwere » Wed Sep 21, 2016 3:11 am

Well, no. :roll:
Forget about parataxis and hypotaxis. It's only making things more complicated. You may either write

Julius magistrum videns eum salutat

or

Julius magistrum videt et eum salutat.

Do you see the difference? Do you understand what is wrong with your Marcus oculos aperiens et servum apud lectum stantem videt? Can you fix it? Your pick.

Second, an adjective should agree with the substantive in gender, number, and case. Can you fix natatilis?
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Thu Sep 22, 2016 4:18 am

Seeing the magistrate, Julius greets him.

Julius sees the magistrate and greets him.

If I were not to consider the definitions you proposed, these might not have been suggested. But it is really definitions I want or I wouldn't be here. I intend to train my thinking. I am not afraid of making mistakes.
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby Matthew Gendzwill » Fri Sep 23, 2016 2:14 pm

Q) Do you understand what is wrong with your Marcus oculos aperiens et servum apud lectum stantem videt?
Well, no. :roll:
Forget about parataxis and hypotaxis. It's only making things more complicated. You may either write

Julius magistrum videns eum salutat

or

Julius magistrum videt et eum salutat.

Do you see the difference? Do you understand what is wrong with your Marcus oculos aperiens et servum apud lectum stantem videt?

A) In the first sentence the conjunction is not used. The active participle works as an adjective for "Julius" and it takes the direct object "magistrum". "Julius eum salutat" is independent. "...magistrum videns" is an adjectival clause for its antecedent "Julius". "In Marcus oculos aperiens et servum apud lectum stantem videt" the coordinating conjunction must not be used because those conjunctions join words and sentences grammatically independent of each other. "Marcus aperiens oculos" is not independent as the nouns and the participle in that clause would only make the subject of some sentence. "servum apud lectum stantem videt" is independent, the subject provided in the third person of the verb which takes a direct object with its active participle adjectve. Mark may be opening his eyes but who is he who sees the servant? So Marcus oculos aperiens servum videt solves the ambiguity of who is seeing the servant.

"Julius magistrum videt et eum salutat." In this sentence each clause has a subject, verb and object and the coordinating conjunction joins them both. I could have written: Marcus oculos aperit et servum stantem...videt.

Bedwere, thank you, don't cut me no slack
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Re: Hans Ordberg, Lingua Latina per se illustrata

Postby bedwere » Fri Sep 23, 2016 2:38 pm

Matthew Gendzwill wrote:Bedwere, thank you, don't cut me no slack


Welcome! Speaking of slack, check your translation of magistrum. :wink:
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