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what grammar principle applies to this subjunctive?

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what grammar principle applies to this subjunctive?

Postby hlawson38 » Mon Jan 26, 2015 3:28 pm

I'm varying my reading a little, looking at Suetonius, "Divius Iulius," chapter X, the first sentence. Suetonius is recounting the deeds of the ambitious young aedile Julius Caesar.

Aedilis praeter Comitium ac Forum basilicasque etiam Capitolium ornavit porticibus ad tempus
extructus in quibus rerum copia pars apparatus exponeretur.


Translation:

As aedile he [Caesar] besides the Comitium, the Forum and basilicias, even the Capitol he furnished with colonnades set up for a while for displaying a pile of stuff, part of the booty he had amassed.


exponeretur: passive, subjunctive, imperfect: I guess the subjunctive here wants to emphasize that the colonnades were build for a purpose, to display some stuff of Caesar's.

apparatus: my translation of this as "booty", was a guess, for I was unsure just what Caesar was putting on display. Since it was put on display in temporary colonnades it must have been pretty impressive stuff.

copia pars: these words I think are in apposition.

I need a checklist like this: upon encountering a subjunctive, consider that it may be one of these: (list of subjunctive uses). The trouble is that I studied the uses of the subjunctive, in several lessons, some time ago, and I have not yet put the interpretation of them on automatic pilot, so to speak.
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Re: what grammar principle applies to this subjunctive?

Postby Qimmik » Mon Jan 26, 2015 5:25 pm

This is a relative clause of purpose. A&G 531:

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0001%3Apart%3D2%3Asection%3D10%3Asubsection%3D9%3Asmythp%3D531

The on-line version of this reads sligthly differently:

Aedilis praeter comitium ac forum basilicasque etiam Capitolium ornauit porticibus ad tempus extructis, in quibus abundante rerum copia pars apparatus exponeretur.

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.02.0061%3Alife%3Djul.%3Achapter%3D10%3Asection%3D1

Crudely and literally:

". . . he adorned with porticos set up temporarily, in which, the supply of his things being abundant [abundante rerum copia is an ablative absolute], part of his magnificent possessions was to be displayed."

You're probably right that apparatus refers to his booty.
Last edited by Qimmik on Mon Jan 26, 2015 5:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: what grammar principle applies to this subjunctive?

Postby Carolus Raeticus » Mon Jan 26, 2015 5:39 pm

Salve hlawson38 (hmm, how do you pronounce your username in Latin?),

First of all, there is a small mistake in the sentence (probably only a typo):
Suetonius wrote:Aedilis praeter comitium ac forum basilicasque etiam Capitolium ornavit porticibus ad tempus extructis, in quibus abundante rerum copia pars apparatus exponeretur.

As for the grammar question. Yes, this is about purpose. A quick internet search brought up the following grammar sheet. I think that it is quite nice.

My question concerning this passage is a different one. What about the abundante rerum copia? I cannot quite account for that.

Vale,

Carolus Raeticus
Sperate miseri, cavete felices.
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Re: what grammar principle applies to this subjunctive?

Postby hlawson38 » Mon Jan 26, 2015 7:00 pm

Thanks again to Quimmik whose generous attention has of great help. If I recall correctly, Qimmik, you once said that you'd never taught Latin. Well, you are teaching me.

And also to Carolus who caught my typing error. It is indeed "extructis". These corrections are extremely helpful. One doesn't know how much help teachers are until he studies alone.

As to abundante, I classified that as the ablative singular of present active participle of abundo, but to be understood as having adverbial force, to mean something like "lavishly". Due to my oversight, that went untranslated in my post.

I learned that concept "adverbial force" from Archibald McClardy, who wrote several books fully parsing classic Latin school texts. In case some have never heard of the redoubtable Mr McClardy, here is an Amazon link to his grammar commentary on the Aeneid, Book I. If you click forward a few pages you get to "Arma virumque cano. . . ."

http://tinyurl.com/kqhrq8a
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Re: what grammar principle applies to this subjunctive?

Postby hlawson38 » Mon Jan 26, 2015 7:24 pm

hlawson38 wrote:As to abundante, I classified that as the ablative singular of present active participle of abundo, but to be understood as having adverbial force, to mean something like "lavishly". Due to my oversight, that went untranslated in my post.


http://tinyurl.com/kqhrq8a


When reading Quimmik's reply I overlooked his parsing of "abundante . . . copia" as an ablative absolute. That looks sound to me.

Is it correct that Romans reading aloud a word like copia would have on autopilot, so to speak, the need to consider the word as nominative singular, or ablative singular?
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Re: what grammar principle applies to this subjunctive?

Postby Qimmik » Mon Jan 26, 2015 9:40 pm

"Is it correct that Romans reading aloud a word like copia would have on autopilot, so to speak, the need to consider the word as nominative singular, or ablative singular?"

The nominative form has a short a, while the ablative has a long a. Romans would have pronounced the two forms differently, and in listening would have been conscious of the difference. (If you or I were to suddenly find ourselves in an ancient Roman setting, it would probably take us a while to pick up the difference, which was probably very slight but perceptible to trained ears.)
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