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Turbato per metum ludicro

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Turbato per metum ludicro

Postby pmda » Thu Jun 12, 2014 1:50 pm

In Orberg's LLPSI Cap XLII:

Turbato [pf3s] per metum [mas] ludicro, maesti [mnp] parentes [mnp] virginum [fgp] profugiunt [pf3p] Romanos [map] 'perfidos [map] hospites' [map] incusantes [mnp] deumque [mas] Neptunum [mas] invocantes [mas].

Through fear, with the disturbing trick (turbato...ludicro) the unhappy parents of the girls pursued the Romans accusing them of being treacherous hosts and calling upon the god Neptune.

I was a little unsure about the opening clause - ablative absolute I think. Does my reading look right?
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Re: Turbato per metum ludicro

Postby Shenoute » Thu Jun 12, 2014 4:35 pm

Yes, it is an ablative absolute (but your tentative translation makes it look like an ablative of mean).
> "The game being disturbed by fear,..."

As for the rest of the sentence, I don't think Romanos is the object of profugiunt (which means "flee" and not "pursue"). They flee, blaming the Romans.
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Re: Turbato per metum ludicro

Postby pmda » Thu Jun 12, 2014 5:49 pm

Thank you.
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Re: Turbato per metum ludicro

Postby pmda » Fri Jun 13, 2014 8:48 am

I think that in: Turbato per metum ludicro

I thought that 'turbato' refers to the parents (Ludicro here by the way is probably more accurately 'trick' than game)

'...so it could translate as 'Agitated through fear by the trick'....the parents fled the Romans....'

but turbato is singular and would not agree with parentes so it must be something like the trick, by fear disturned'...but this is not satisfactory....

what do you think he means in plain English..?
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Re: Turbato per metum ludicro

Postby Shenoute » Fri Jun 13, 2014 9:56 am

Hi,

The Romans have prepared some entertainement and invited their neighbours. In the middle of it, they seize their neighbours' women/girls which frightens the neighbours and disturbs the game(s)/show.

Charlton T. Lewis, An Elementary Latin Dictionary wrote:lūdicrum ī, n
ludicer, a sport, toy, means of sport, game : iuvenes, quibus id ludicrum est, Ta.: et versūs et cetera ludicra pono, trifles , H. — A show, public game, scenic show, stage-play : Olympiorum solemne, L., H.
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Re: Turbato per metum ludicro

Postby pmda » Sun Jun 15, 2014 2:32 pm

...but my question is: what does 'turbato' refer to? Whom or what does it apply to?
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Re: Turbato per metum ludicro

Postby Qimmik » Sun Jun 15, 2014 3:18 pm

what does 'turbato' refer to?


ludicro
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Re: Turbato per metum ludicro

Postby pmda » Tue Jun 17, 2014 1:38 pm

OK so it's the trick that is disturbed...?

'...by this disturb(ing?) trick....' ?
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Re: Turbato per metum ludicro

Postby Qimmik » Tue Jun 17, 2014 2:06 pm

Ludicrum here means "game" or "games," NOT "trick".

lūdicrum ī, n . . . A show, public game, scenic show, stage-play


Turbato is passive.

"The games having been disturbed/disrupted by fear . . . " Ablative absolute.

Also maesti parentes virginum profugiunt Romanos - [i]"the unhappy parents of the girls flee [not "pursue"] the Romans."[/i]
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