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Sallust, "Letter of Mithridates"

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Sallust, "Letter of Mithridates"

Postby hlawson38 » Fri Mar 15, 2013 2:26 am

Very last paragraph. Sallust represents Mithridates writing another king to persuade him to join in an alliance against the Romans.

Teque illa fama sequetur, auxilio profectum magnis regibus latrones gentium oppressissse.

And that report will accompany you, by aid to great kings you crushed the plunderers of the nations.

I can't make out "profectum".
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Re: Sallust, "Letter of Mithridates"

Postby whsiv » Fri Mar 15, 2013 11:42 am

Salve,

It's looking to me like the past participle of proficisci. If this is the case, I would tend toward understanding auxilio in its military sense of "auxiliary troops" (admittedly this use is more frequent in the plural, but it does show up in the singular - and I don't think Sallust would hesitate at all to use a slightly more rare word).

"...having set out with auxiliary forces..."

Caesar has a similar construction (though he uses the plural): Caesar confisus famā rerum gestarum, infirmis auxiliis proficisci non dubitaverat, Caes. B. C. 3, 106
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Re: Sallust, "Letter of Mithridates"

Postby adrianus » Fri Mar 15, 2013 3:18 pm

Ut opinor,
"And this reputation will attend you: by the aid given to great kings [auxilio quod profectum est], to have put down those who prey on other nations."
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Sallust, "Letter of Mithridates"

Postby hlawson38 » Thu Mar 21, 2013 8:20 pm

Thanks to whsiv and adrianus for the replies. Both were helpful, in that I just couldn't find any function for "profectum" in the quotation. I had considered it as a perfect participle of "profiscor", but could cast no satisfactory meaning for it, but I didn't think of "perfectum" in adrianus's sense at all.

Adrianus, is it correct that you read "perfectum" as the perfect participle of "proficio"?
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Re: Sallust, "Letter of Mithridates"

Postby Qimmik » Thu Mar 21, 2013 11:22 pm

profectum agrees with te. From proficiscor. "And the fame will follow you that you, having set out as a help to great kings, crushed the plunderers of the nations."

Less literally:

"And you will become famous for having set out to help great kings and thereby having crushed the plunderers of the nations."

Here's a similar use of profectus with subsidio in the dative and the persons helped in the dative from Cornelius Nepos:

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Nep. Iph. 2.5&lang=original
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Re: Sallust, "Letter of Mithridates"

Postby Qimmik » Fri Mar 22, 2013 12:28 am

Auxilio is dative of purpose (Allen & Greenough sec. 382). They cite Caesar, Bellum Gallicum, i. 52: tertiam aciem nostris subsidio misit., 'he sent the third line as a relief to our men.'

And you will become famous for having gone to the aid of great kings [more literally, set out as an aid to great kings] and thereby crushed the plunderers of nations.
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Re: Sallust, "Letter of Mithridates"

Postby adrianus » Fri Mar 22, 2013 4:37 pm

hlawson38 wrote:Adrianus, is it correct that you read "perfectum" as the perfect participle of "proficio"?

Est // yes
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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