Textkit Logo

Some difficulty...

Here's where you can discuss all things Latin. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get translation help and more!

Moderator: thesaurus

Some difficulty...

Postby Lumen_et_umbra » Tue Aug 19, 2003 9:23 pm

How would I use the verb postponere in a context, which suggests I esteem one thing to be of a greater value than another? Can the verb postponere even specify more than one object?<br /><br />If so, would the sentence be something like the following?<br /><br />[b]Pecuniae hominem postpono[b]<br />I put after money, the man.<br /><br /><br />The non-compound-verb form would be something like:<br /><br />Pono hominem post pecuniam. (This, however, may only be in the physical sense.)<br /><br />I find this confusing.
phpbb
Lumen_et_umbra
Textkit Member
 
Posts: 143
Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2003 1:12 am
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah

Re:Some difficulty...

Postby bingley » Wed Aug 20, 2003 5:09 am

The Lewis and Short entry for postpono (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/pt ... 3D%2337238) gives examples: <br />scorto postponere honestum Officium, Hor. Ep. 1, 18, 34 : postponere Hannibalem Alexandro Magno. Just. 30, 4, 9<br /><br />and glosses postpono as to esteem less. Presumably then the accusative is the less valued thing and the ablative of comparison gives the more valued thing.<br />
bingley
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 640
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2003 10:04 am
Location: Jakarta

Re:Some difficulty...

Postby Skylax » Wed Aug 20, 2003 1:58 pm

[quote author=bingley link=board=3;threadid=510;start=0#4484 date=1061356199]<br />scorto postponere honestum Officium, Hor. Ep. 1, 18, 34 : postponere Hannibalem Alexandro Magno. Just. 30, 4, 9<br />[/quote]<br /><br />The accusative is the direct object of ponere<br />scorto and Alexandro are datives denoting post what?<br /><br />The same with praeferre to bring something (acc) before something else (dative) or praeficere "to place someone (acc) at the head of something (dative) : te praeficio provinciae "I place you at he head of the province".<br /><br />It can happen (but not always) with the verbs beginning with ad-, ante-, cum- in-, inter-, ob-, post-, prae-, sub-, super-<br /><br />Valete
User avatar
Skylax
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 672
Joined: Fri Jun 06, 2003 8:18 am
Location: Belgium

Re:Some difficulty...

Postby Lumen_et_umbra » Thu Aug 21, 2003 1:04 am

Thank you for your help. I wish the Romans hadn't compounded verbs with prepositions made prefixes. The rules can sometimes get a bit funky... :-\<br /><br />Thanks again. :)
phpbb
Lumen_et_umbra
Textkit Member
 
Posts: 143
Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2003 1:12 am
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah


Return to Learning Latin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Alexa [Bot], Phil- and 63 guests