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Et verbum caro factum est

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Et verbum caro factum est

Postby Scarlatti » Sun Nov 18, 2012 3:23 am

I'm sure there is a simple answer to this, but why is the appositive "caro" used here, why isn't "flesh" the direct object of the sentence and thus in the accusative -- "carnem"?
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Re: Et verbum caro factum est

Postby bedwere » Sun Nov 18, 2012 4:53 am

Scarlatti wrote:I'm sure there is a simple answer to this, but why is the appositive "caro" used here, why isn't "flesh" the direct object of the sentence and thus in the accusative -- "carnem"?


Because "fio" is a copulative verb like "sum", "videor", etc. and thus takes the double nominative:

Paulus bonus est
Petrus fatigatus videtur
Verbum caro fit

Besides, it is a word by word translation of the Greek: καὶ ὁ λόγος σὰρξ ἐγένετο
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Re: Et verbum caro factum est

Postby Scarlatti » Sun Nov 18, 2012 5:21 am

Thank you for the quick response. I am a rank beginner, about a hundred pages through D'Ooge, and haven't encountered the double nominative yet by name. I never thought of a line like "Lesbia dea est" as being a double nominative, I just saw that as a use of the appositive, with "dea" being a description of Lesbia.

What confused me with "Et verbum caro factum est" is that the Word is MADE flesh, a change is effected, clearly "caro" does not just describe "verbum." Now it makes sense, thanks again!
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