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A small plural case ending question

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A small plural case ending question

Postby Benedarius » Sun Jun 05, 2005 8:43 pm

Would, "Diana's arrows are killing the wild beasts of the land,"
be translated as
"Sagittas Dianarum feras terrarum necant"
or as
"Sagittas Dianae feras terrae necant"
and could I have the reason why as well.

Probably the same question but with out the example, does the gentive agree with the nominative or the accustative, which ever the case may be (no pun intended).
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Re: A small plural case ending question

Postby benissimus » Sun Jun 05, 2005 11:13 pm

Benedarius wrote:Would, "Diana's arrows are killing the wild beasts of the land,"
be translated as
"Sagittas Dianarum feras terrarum necant"
or as
"Sagittas Dianae feras terrae necant"
and could I have the reason why as well.

First of all Dianarum does not make sense. How could you have plural Diana? There is only one Diana.

Second, in the sentence "Diana's arrows are killing the wild beasts of the land":

Diana's = possessive = genitive
arrows = subject = nominative
are killing = verb
the wild beasts = direct object
of the land = possessive = genitive

You put the subject (sagittas) into the accusative! That should be in the nominative.

Probably the same question but with out the example, does the gentive agree with the nominative or the accustative, which ever the case may be (no pun intended).

What do you mean "agree"? The genitive case ending does not change no matter what it is modifying, perhaps you are thinking of adjectives.


Welcome to Textkit by the way :)
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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Re: A small plural case ending question

Postby Benedarius » Sun Jun 05, 2005 11:57 pm

What do you mean "agree"? The genitive case ending does not change no matter what it is modifying, perhaps you are thinking of adjectives.


Welcome to Textkit by the way :)


What I meant was, what makes a gentive case word plural. Isit the word it is modifing, or is there some idea that I am still missing out on.

Thank you very much. Funny how confused I can get with languages for a lingustic person. Well more accurately a language-lover but they often amount to the same thing.
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Postby Deccius » Mon Jun 06, 2005 12:52 am

Salve Benedari,

The noun ending on the genitive singular in the first declension is -ae, while the genitive plural is -arum. Thus.....

Puellae of the girl
Puellarum of the girls


I hope this helps you understand
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Postby Andrus » Mon Jun 06, 2005 8:10 am

Salve Benedari,

Benedarius wrote:Probably the same question but with out the example, does the gentive agree with the nominative or the accustative...


The Genitive doesn’t agree in number (singular or plural) with the Nominative and neither with the accusative.

The Genitive has the number identical to the person or persons that have something.

Changing Diana to Puella (girl), if the arrows are of one girl:

Sagittae puellae (The arrows of the girl)

If the arrows are of the girls:

Sagittae puellārum (The arrow of the girls)

In the exercise you are doing “Diana’s arrows are killing the wild beast of the land” you have:

“arrows” are the subject of the phrase, i.e. they are what is doing something, so they are in the Nominative plural (has they are more than one arrow) and will be “sagittae”

Diana is the person that own the arrows so will be in Genitive singular, i.e. “Diānae”

The wild beasts are the thing/person to which something is done so they are in the accusative plural (once more plural because they are more then one) and will be “ferās”

The wild beasts belong to the land so “land” will be in genitive singular (as it is land and not lands), i.e. “terrae”.

So the translation should be:

“Sagittae Diānae ferās terrae necant”

Hope this helps and welcome to these forums.

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