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Translating "please close the door" to Latin

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Translating "please close the door" to Latin

Postby JLatin1 » Wed May 18, 2005 6:35 pm

Singular:? ianuam adoperi!
Plural:? ianuam adoperite!

My question mark represents please, because I don't know what the Lstin word is.

Thanks,
-Jonathan
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Postby Ioannes » Wed May 18, 2005 7:00 pm

i'd say:

please open the door, sg 2th, pl 2th:
quaeso ianuam ut aperias
quaeso ianuam ut aperiatis

please close the door, sg 2th, pl 2th:

quaeso ianuam ut cludas.
quaeso ianuam ut cludatis.
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Postby whiteoctave » Wed May 18, 2005 7:26 pm

an imperative with a parenthetic verb of entreaty strikes me as a more Latinate way of stating the matter, i.e. ostium claude, obsecro (or amabo if a woman is stating it). (any word order of the three, as long as obs. isn't first position would be fine.)
cludo etc. for claudo etc. is a sign (in Classical times) of lower class or some countrification. the monophthongisation of au to u was generally fought against by the elite class (whose Latin we aim to speak). an amusing example of this is recorded by Suetonius, wherein Vespasian is rebuked by Mestrius Florus for saying plostrum instead of plaustrum: with cheeky hypercorrection the emperor on next seeing M.F. greets him as 'Flaure'. as a corollary to this, Claudius is said to have pronounced his name Clodius so as to avoid alienating himself from the pop.Rom.
au is, however, regularly weakened to u in composition, e.g. claudo: concludo. as a final note on au, in Imperial times au when followed by a syllable containing u was monophthongised to a, cf. It. agusto < Imp.Lat. agustus < C.L. augustus.
ostium is, like ianua, used especially of external doors into buildings but seems well enough attested to mean the house-internal doors, to which I suppose you are referring.

~D
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Postby Cyborg » Thu May 19, 2005 2:54 pm

can't "door" be "porta, -ae" (in Classics) ?
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Postby whiteoctave » Thu May 19, 2005 6:10 pm

i know no instance of porta as an internal door, and it is seldom used of doors at all; rather it refers to gates (gen.pl.), literal or figurative.

~D
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Postby Ioannes » Thu May 19, 2005 7:39 pm

I agree with Whiteoctave. i have never seen "porta" been used as "door" in that sense, it has rather been used as "gate" or "entrance" (i.e. city gates, Porta Romana). My dictionaries agree with me, although a digital dictionary, "words.exe", gives:

porta, portae N F
gate, entrance; city gates; door; avenue;

ps. although words deriving from "porta" are in some romance languages often used as "door".
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Postby JLatin1 » Fri May 20, 2005 1:45 am

whiteoctave wrote:an imperative with a parenthetic verb of entreaty strikes me as a more Latinate way of stating the matter, i.e. ostium claude, obsecro (or amabo if a woman is stating it). (any word order of the three, as long as obs. isn't first position would be fine.)
cludo etc. for claudo etc. is a sign (in Classical times) of lower class or some countrification. the monophthongisation of au to u was generally fought against by the elite class (whose Latin we aim to speak). an amusing example of this is recorded by Suetonius, wherein Vespasian is rebuked by Mestrius Florus for saying plostrum instead of plaustrum: with cheeky hypercorrection the emperor on next seeing M.F. greets him as 'Flaure'. as a corollary to this, Claudius is said to have pronounced his name Clodius so as to avoid alienating himself from the pop.Rom.
au is, however, regularly weakened to u in composition, e.g. claudo: concludo. as a final note on au, in Imperial times au when followed by a syllable containing u was monophthongised to a, cf. It. agusto < Imp.Lat. agustus < C.L. augustus.
ostium is, like ianua, used especially of external doors into buildings but seems well enough attested to mean the house-internal doors, to which I suppose you are referring.

~D


The door is that of a classroom, or a bedroom or a car door. Would these all be the same word?
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Postby Cyborg » Fri May 20, 2005 6:33 pm

I see, thanks for the replies.
Ioannes, about your dictionaries: have you got one that tells the length of all the vowels? I'm really interested in buying one as such.
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Postby Ioannes » Fri May 20, 2005 6:42 pm

it does, although it's a latin - norwegian dictionary =)
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Postby Cyborg » Fri May 20, 2005 6:46 pm

what a shame... :(
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