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Veni Vidi Vici

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Veni Vidi Vici

Postby Aug33 » Tue Feb 15, 2005 10:50 pm

What is the conjugation of these verbs,"Veni, Vidi, Vici" I understand that the quote was,
"I came, I saw, I conquered." but "I came" is, Veniebam, is it not. what forms are they in? Aug33
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Postby Turpissimus » Tue Feb 15, 2005 11:02 pm

"I came" is, Veniebam, is it not.


Veniebam is the imperfect tense. It means something like "I used to come" or "I was coming".

Veni is the perfect tense. Means "I have come" or "I came". You'll learn about it later in your textbook.
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Postby poeta nequitiae meae » Tue Feb 15, 2005 11:16 pm

veniebam - eh? 'I was coming'?!

another great Tuesday at Life, then?
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Postby benissimus » Wed Feb 16, 2005 2:21 am

Both tenses can of course be translated as a simple past "I came". The imperfect represents continuous action, whereas the perfect represents concluded action (often as it affects the present). These respective ideas are emphasized by more verbose translations such as those which Turpissimus offers, which are usually recommended translations over the simple past for beginners until they truly understand the sense difference.

veni "I came" is from the 4th conjugation verb venio, venire, veni, ventvm

vidi "I saw" is from the 2nd conjugation verb video, videre, vidi, visvm

vici "I conquered" is from the 3rd conjugation verb vinco, vincere, vici, victvm


All these forms are the 1st person singular perfect active indicative forms of those verbs, derived from the third principal part (they actually are the third principal parts in this case).
Last edited by benissimus on Fri Oct 28, 2005 4:14 am, edited 1 time in total.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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Postby z28racergirl » Mon May 23, 2005 11:11 pm

I'm part of an amateur car racing team, and we thought of a "slogan" recently. I took Latin in high school but promptly forgot much of it as soon as I graduated. (Whoops.) Anyway, would someone mind translating "we came (venibamus?), we broke (as in, broke down = infractus?), we drank (as in, to drink a beer = imbibo?)" into Latin for me? I'd really appreciate it.

Thanks in advance,
Christine
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Postby Lucus Eques » Tue May 24, 2005 3:11 am

benissimus wrote:veni "I came" is from the 4th conjugation verb venio, venire, veni, ventvm

vidi "I saw" is from the 2nd conjugation verb video, videre, vidi, visvm

vici "I conquered" is from the 3rd conjugation verb vinco, vincere, vici, victvm


Ooh! tumne 'v' pro 'u' uteris? David te non conuicit? ;)
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Postby Cyborg » Tue May 24, 2005 3:35 am

z28racergirl wrote:Anyway, would someone mind translating "we came (venibamus?), we broke (as in, broke down = infractus?), we drank (as in, to drink a beer = imbibo?)" into Latin for me? I'd really appreciate it.

Thanks in advance,
Christine


It could be: uenimus, fregimus, potauimus (or bibimus, I don't know which is more Classical).
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Postby benissimus » Tue May 24, 2005 9:38 am

you can't say "we broke" in Latin with the sense of "our vehicle broke down".


Lucus Eques wrote:Ooh! tumne 'v' pro 'u' uteris? David te non conuicit?

This is a fairly old thread and since then I convinced myself (without whiteoctave's influence) that u is better for lower case and v for upper case. However, I don't care much for which is used - as long as people are not writing in Latin cursive or engraving style uncials they can never claim to be writing in an entirely authentic way. Regardless, since the u of Latin cursive is a softening of v, it suggests that at some point before its softening, v may have been used in the casual style.
Last edited by benissimus on Wed May 25, 2005 8:13 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Postby z28racergirl » Tue May 24, 2005 3:21 pm

[quote="benissimus"]you can't say "we broke" in Latin with the sense of "our vehicle broke down".

Well of course, but what about "we broke the dish" or "we broke the wagon"? Along those lines?

Anyway, many thanks!

Christine 8)
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Postby Episcopus » Tue May 24, 2005 3:41 pm

poeta nequitiae meae wrote:veniebam - eh? 'I was coming'?!

another great Tuesday at Life, then?


Lucus Eques wrote:David te non conuicit?


Pick your favourite EQVESOMI

nonne david did he not ... ?
num ... he didn't ... did he?

poeta - OMFG LOL
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Postby Lucus Eques » Wed May 25, 2005 3:10 am

benissimus wrote:This is a fairly old thread and since then I convinced myself (without whiteoctave's influence) that u is better for lower case and v for upper case. However, I don't care much for which is used - as long as people are not writing in Latin cursive or engraving style uncials they can never claim to be writing the proper way. Regardless, since the u of Latin cursive is a softening of v, it clearly says that at some point v or u was used in both cases (how else would it go through a softening?).


Hehe, certe, amice; solum iocabar. Indeed, I enjoy the use of 'V' for the majuscule myself (I have yet to alter my signature quote, in fact, for that very reason).

nonne david did he not ... ?
num ... he didn't ... did he?


I found both those connotations too strong for my liking, even though I did consider them; instead I opted for the simplest form of interrogative (that which is understood simply from tone of voice, or in this case, from the question mark), not requiring an interrogative particle.
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