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Correct sentence structure

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Correct sentence structure

Postby Joementum » Sat Sep 11, 2004 4:46 pm

I am wondering how to place the sentence "fear the indifference of good men." I know its tacky, but a friend would like it. I have found that it may be "bonus lentitudo metuo" Does this sound correct, and if not please explain why and how to correct it. Thanks alot.

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Re: Correct sentence structure

Postby benissimus » Sat Sep 11, 2004 5:07 pm

Joementum wrote:I am wondering how to place the sentence "fear the indifference of good men." I know its tacky, but a friend would like it. I have found that it may be "bonus lentitudo metuo" Does this sound correct, and if not please explain why and how to correct it. Thanks alot.

Those words should do fine, but not in the forms you have them in. As it is, it makes little sense: it has two conflicting subjects and a verb that agrees with neither.

metuo means "I fear". To say "fear" as a command (imperative), you would use the form metue.

lentitudo could mean "indifference" or "apathy", as the subject of the sentence. You want it to be the object of the sentence (accusative): lentitudinem.

bonus means "good man". "Of good men" (genitive plural) would be bonorum.

All together:
metue lentitudinem bonorum

The words can go in pretty much any order in this case, though this is the most standard.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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