Textkit Logo

More practice sentences

Here's where you can discuss all things Latin. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get translation help and more!

Moderator: thesaurus

More practice sentences

Postby Amy » Mon Sep 06, 2004 6:40 pm

thanks everyone! ...again! :?

This work is very difficult but we hope that our desire for glory will give us strength.
Hoc opus difficillimum est sed speramus cupiditatem nostram victoriae vires datura esse nobis.

I know that you are all asking whether he did it or not.
Scio omnes vestri rogare utrum id fecerit necne.
(did I get the utrum. . .necne formation right?)

I had sailed many miles to come to this place because I had hoped to find my brother.
Multia milia passuum navigeram ut hoc ad locum venirem quod fratrem meum inventurum esse speraveram.
phpbb
Amy
Textkit Fan
 
Posts: 207
Joined: Sun Apr 04, 2004 2:01 am
Location: Massachusetts

Re: More practice sentences

Postby benissimus » Tue Sep 07, 2004 9:34 am

Amy wrote:This work is very difficult but we hope that our desire for glory will give us strength.
Hoc opus difficillimum est sed speramus cupiditatem nostram victoriae vires datura esse nobis.

There is just one small error: datura esse refers to cupiditatem so it must agree in case.

I know that you are all asking whether he did it or not.
Scio omnes vestri rogare utrum id fecerit necne.
(did I get the utrum. . .necne formation right?)

utrum... necne is correct. Latin does not say "all of you", but "you all": vos omnes instead of omnes vestri.

I had sailed many miles to come to this place because I had hoped to find my brother.
Multia milia passuum navigeram ut hoc ad locum venirem quod fratrem meum inventurum esse speraveram.

multia should be multa, i-stems only apply to third declension adjectives.
the perfect stem of navigo is navigav-, so "I had sailed" is navigaveram.
locus is masculine, so hoc should be masculine accusative singular: hunc ad locum.
also, this sentence might not be the best place to leave out me, as in me fratrem inventurum esse. This is because the gender and case of inventurum agree with fratrem and could be interpreted in a way other than you intend (though logic leads us to the more likely meaning).
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California


Return to Learning Latin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 30 guests